Angry Bag 2.0 | The Recipe

portfolio-ab-05

PROJECT TITLE
Angry Bag 2.0 | The Recipe

PROJECT BY 
Priya Bandodkar

DOCUMENTATION VIDEO – THE RECIPE

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

‘Angry Bag 2.0 – The Recipe’ is an open-source 3D printable DIY kit that one can use to build the ‘Angry Bag’ (http://blog.ocad.ca/wordpress/digf3010-fw201903-01/2020/03/angry-bag/) electronic wearable at their convenience. The kit contains required instructions to build this wearable including through a 3D-rendered video, list of materials, code and circuit diagram that serves as a blueprint for the circuitry. In addition, the kit supplies a pre-built ready-to-print 3D model of the bag that can be 3D printed in ABS or PLA material and easily assembled by the user. The model contains support elements such as the strap made of links that can be customised to the desired length, mount for actuator, and pipes to carry wires for a sleek circuit design. It can thus be created by anyone with basic understanding of circuit diagrams.

This approach is a culmination of my final project proposal and a response to the ongoing pandemic situation. In my proposal for the final project, I planned to expand my Expressive Wearables project ‘Angry Bag’ (http://blog.ocad.ca/wordpress/digf3010-fw201903-01/2020/03/angry-bag/) by addressing the limitations in the prototype and redesigning the aesthetics through different material choices and fabrication. Due to lack of access to fabrication labs, I was unable laser-cut the proposed design. I was wary of compromising on the aesthetics and finesse, as that was the crux of my expectation from the final project. Through this approach, I was not only able to realise a strong design without compromise but also take it to the next level by making it an open source project.

I have produced two options for the circuitry and consequently two kit options for users to choose from–one with a solenoid actuator and other with a servo actuator–both effective towards fulfilling the concept. The reason for providing the second option is energy efficiency as the solenoid draws more power when compared to servo.

PORTFOLIO IMAGES (3D Renders)portfolio-ab-03portfolio-ab-01

portfolio-ab-02portfolio-ab-04portfolio-ab-07 portfolio-ab-06 portfolio-ab-08 portfolio-ab-09

OPTION SOLENOID

Ingredients

Part Source
1x  Arduino Nano 33 IoT Creatron Inc
1 x LED Light Creatron Inc
1 x Solenoid Actuator Creatron Inc
1 x Analog Sensor (Velostat, Conductive Fabric, Neoprene) of size 7” x 3” Elmwood Electronics (https://elmwoodelectronics.ca/)
Wires Creatron Inc
2 x 2.2K Ohm Resistors Creatron Inc
1 x Diode Creatron Inc
1 x Transistor Creatron Inc
1 x 12V Battery Creatron Inc

 Circuit Diagram

circuit-diagram_solenoid

LINK TO KIT

https://github.com/priyabandodkar/Angry-Bag_2_Solenoid-Kit

This kit contains:

  • 3D video of how to assemble the bag
  • Circuit test video
  • Parts list
  • Code
  • Circuit diagram
  • Editable 3D model in Maya binary format
  • 3D model in STL format for 3D printing

OPTION SERVO

Ingredients

Part Source
1 x Adafruit Circuit Playground Express Board Creatron Inc
1 x LED Light Creatron Inc
1 x Servo Motor Creatron Inc
1 x Analog Sensor (Velostat, Conductive Fabric, Neoprene) of size 7” x 3” Elmwood Electronics (https://elmwoodelectronics.ca/)
Wires Creatron Inc
1 x 2.2K Ohm Resistor Creatron In

Circuit Diagram

circuit-diagram_servo

LINK TO KIT

https://github.com/priyabandodkar/Angry-Bag-2_Servo-Kit

This kit contains:

  • 3D video of how to assemble the bag
  • Circuit test video
  • Parts list
  • Code
  • Circuit diagram
  • Editable 3D model in Maya binary format
  • 3D model in STL format for 3D printing

CONCEPT, PROCESS, DESIGN CHOICES

Below is the initial sketch from my proposal suggesting new material choices (semi-transparent acrylic and cloth mesh) to redesign the aesthetics and bring down the weight of the bag. I realised the weight aspect was crucial when I had made the first my prototype using plywood. Hence the switch to 3D print using ABS or PLA worked perfectly, as this can bring down the weight considerably, making the bag relatively much lighter.

initial-concept-sketch

Construction (3D Model) & Aesthetics

I decided to carry forward the geometric, boxy form for the bag as in the prototype because it brought out the concept distinctively and strongly. I built the model using the 3D modeling software, Autodesk Maya. I created the hinge functionality within the model geometry to facilitate the rotation of the bottom flap, thus eliminating the task of adding a hinge separately. This also added to the clean look of the bag. I cut abstract geometric shapes on the font side of the bag to make it distinguishable and to enhance its appeal as a product. I strategically made holes in the model for the solenoid, LED and wires. In the file, I added secondary elements such as a case to hold the microcontroller and battery on the rear side, mount to hold the solenoid, pipes to carry and conceal circuitry wires. Please refer to the below image for the evolution of the 3D model and design.

3d-model-evolution 3d-model-all

I have thus 3D-modeled the bag and support elements completely in Maya. The 3D model of the woman carrying the bag is an open-source model from FUTURESCAN (https://www.turbosquid.com/Search/Artists/Futurescan). I have worked on the shading, lighting, rendering and animation of all the assets in the scenes.

3d-model-lighting

Circuit Tests

Building on the circuitry from the prototype, I was keen on testing the feasibility of incorporating a solenoid actuator in place of a servo, as it could then be contained within the bag. The circuit for solenoid required incorporating a diode and transistor, but the biggest trade off was that the solenoid consumed more energy and required a 12V battery. I thus ran circuit tests using both solenoid and servo actuators as documented in the video below.

Coding

The code uses data from the analog sensor on the bottom flap, which is triggered by the weight of the objects inside the bag. The analog threshold makes the LED to start blinking. Each LED blink is linked to a counter. Thus once the counter reaches a specified count (in this case, 20), the solenoid pulls/servo rotates and sets the bottom flap to open.

CODES ON GITHUB

https://github.com/priyabandodkar/Angry-Bag_2_Codes

WEARABILITY CRITERIA

This wearable uses critical design, which challenges the status quo of existing affirmative designs (Dunne and Raby, 34). Thus, the purpose of creation of this concept is to critique the norms and standards of wearability.

PROJECT CONTEXT

As I was researching on my spotlight presentation, I came across early works of Anouk Wipprecht such as the Spider Dress, Smoke Dress, and the self-painting Pseudomorph Dress which based on my understanding were underlined by critical design and speculative design.

anouk-ink-dress
Image source: https://www.wired.com/2010/10/dutch-designer-self-painting-dress/

I was intrigued by this quote from one her interviews for Vice, when she talked about the Spider Dress extending the agency through partial autonomy.

“If you wear a design that you partly control and it partly extends your agency through its autonomous actions, you start to question where you end and my system begins.”

-Anouk Wipprecht

(https://www.vice.com/en_au/article/jpvp74/coming-in-2015-a-dress-that-defends-itself)

This affordance of extended agency that a wearable can offer through critical design was pretty strong and I hence aspired to bring it through my concept and design. Instead of augmenting from existing design, I created a uncommon-looking design for a bag, and gave it partial autonomy to decide whether to hold the stuff it is loaded with or not. The cuts on the front side of my design, no flap, and an autonomous bottom flap lended the unique appeal this concept deserved.

While designing wearables, one of the biggest challenges I faced was to contain the circuitry within the aesthetics. All along this class I’ve been trying to wrap my head around making clean design wearables. This was also the crux of the expectation of this assignment prior to this unprecedented situation. When I looked into Wipprecht’s work, apart from the critical design aspect, what also inspired me was the sheer aesthetics and craftsmanship of construction. I studied the making of some her works through online resources, and was able to get my hands on some insights. I learned that Wipprecht primarily modeled her dresses using Autodesk Maya and used different materials for 3D printing them. The choice of 3D material was based on the properties that aligned to expected function of the design.

anouk-smoke-dress-3d
Image Source: https://www.makery.info/en/2017/02/14/anouk-wipprecht-met-le-corps-sur-ecoute/

I realised the level of flexibility in modeling the design scratch was enormous and it helped me eliminate some of the undesired elements from the physical design such as using a hinge. Further I also observed how Wipprecht concealed her circuit elements within 3D printed mounts. I think this was clever not only to keep the clean look but also to secure the parts within the dress. Incorporating the same technique, I used a mount for the solemoid and created a case to hold the battery and micro controller. I additionally created 3D pipes to carry wires, thus adding to the sleek look and also securing the wires.

anouk-spider-dress
Image sources: http://www.anoukwipprecht.nl/gallery, https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/3d-printed-mechatronic-spider-dress-38553/

Next, coming to the documentation for the kit, I seeked inspiration from Alda Escareño’s MDES Thesis at OCAD University. Alda was also my faculty for the digital fabrication class. I believe the way Alda was able to share her work in laser cutting, CNC milling through her thesis project realised in the form of https://www.joyoflasercutting.com/ was an incredible way of sharing work. I could very well connect my intentions with the documentation of this project with Alda’s way. In fact, my recipe had several more diverse ingredients, so it felt pretty apt to me.

joy-of-laser_cutting-1
Image source: https://www.joyoflasercutting.com/fruitcreme

joy-of-laser_cutting-2
Image source: https://www.joyoflasercutting.com/fruitcreme

Synthesising these ideas and inspirations, I created a wearable using the critical design methodology and delivered it using an open source format that could be used by anyone with basic circuit diagram understanding to build, customise and learn from.

REFLECTION

I was very excited about working on the final project initially, and it felt disheartening when it could not be completed the way it was planned. But after being able to accept and adapt to the unprecedented situation, I was able to find a new directionmaking it shareable and open source. This made the work feel purposeful inspite of the constraints posed by the situation. I was deeply satisfied with this renewed approach and the consequent outcome.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Dunne, Anthony, and Fiona Raby. Speculative Everything: Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming. MIT Press, 2014.

“Anouk Wipprecht FashionTech.” Anouk Wipprecht FashionTech, www.anoukwipprecht.nl/.

Ferreira, Becky. “Coming in 2015: A Dress That Defends Itself.” Vice, 23 Dec. 2014, www.vice.com/en_au/article/jpvp74/coming-in-2015-a-dress-that-defends-itself.

Essop, Anas, et al. “3D Printed Mechatronic Spider Dress?” 3D Printing Industry, 22 Oct. 2018, 3dprintingindustry.com/news/3d-printed-mechatronic-spider-dress-38553/.

Escareño, Alda. “Joy of Laser Cutting.” Joy of Laser Cutting, www.joyoflasercutting.com/.

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