Tell Your Own Tale

img-20200418-wa0006

Project Description:

What is the idea?

‘Tell Your Own Tale’ consists of an interactive puppet to craft stories from multiple endings. The name of the puppet is ‘RoopKatha’ meaning ‘fairytale’ in Bengali. It has tactile buttons on the surface from 1 to 8, which will allow the user to explore different outcomes from one story. 

What is the story behind it?

‘Tell your own Tale’, uses the narrative methodology of Choose-Your-Own-Adventure style. Here, the viewers or readers can choose from alternative decisions posing as the protagonist. There are 2 options of the main character i.e. Jude for males & Julie for females.  Each decision will lead to a different path for the characters and create new subplots. The chronicles resemble the vocabulary and metaphors of classic fairy tales, especially bedtime stories consisting of magic, fantasy, witchcraft, palaces and royal families. This indicates using syntaxes like – ‘Once upon a time’, or Happily-ever-after’ etc.

Who is this intended for and where is it meant to be used?

It is intended for 4 – 8 years old children, who enjoy fairy and fantasy fiction. But the puppet needs to be monitored by their parents. It could be an online, engaging, enjoyable and an alternative to the traditional bedtime storybooks.

 How does it work?

The wearable here would be a hand-puppet as they are exclusively used for storytelling to children. Numbered-Tactile buttons are pasted on its body to provide options for the kids. When the buttons are pressed, illustrated pages appear on the screen. The kid, as the main protagonist will choose the numbers which will vary the finale. Usage of a laptop is essential for the screen displays.

20200418_200548

Project Context: 

What are some related works? Are there any projects that are similar or have acted as inspiration?

During my childhood years, I enjoyed reading ‘Goosebumps’ storybooks which were structured in the form of Choose-Your-Own-Adventure narrative styles. At the end of each page, readers were given the option to decide how to travel through the stories by choosing which page/storyline to proceed. While some end resulted in tragedies others would lead to the triumph of good over evil. 

I created my own bedtime story inspired by Fairy Tales that were narrated to me before bedtime. However, every time before my mother could complete the story I would have felt asleep. So I felt if the narrative were more engaging and interacting for the kids they might stay awake and hear the completion of the stories.

 

Prototyping

I created fabric buttons numbered from one to eight which gave the kids multiple options for the kids to choose their different storylines. They were connected to the capacitive sensors via conductive thread. Each button would trigger an illustration to appear on the computer screen. Serial communication was used to transmit the images from Arduino to processing. Conductive fabrics were provided below the felt fabric. Blue colour is used for eye soothing effect.

Executions:

I referred to the illustrations styles of Tara Krebs,  Anastasia Suvorova and Alena Tkach. I observed digital paintings found in Behance and Freepik.com platforms to create my visual language for the virtual bedtime story. These illustrations and the story concepts are original and self-created.

Illustrations:

Instructions – Hello reader! I am going to fabricate your own fairy-tale. We shall process from the far far away ‘LalKomol’ (meaning Red lotus in Bengali) Kingdom. It is a gloomy province ruled by a sad royal couple. You are on a quest to rescue their only child from the clutches of Witch ‘BuriAima’(meaning Old Dame in Bengali). Press the numbers to decide directions. Press (2) to be the brave Jade or press (3) to be the valiant Julie.

(2) - Wonderful! Now as Jude, you have begun your journey by flying the royal unicorn towards the ‘Cloud Castle’. Upon arrival at its gigantic gates, you see an old lady. To talk to the old lady press (6) or to continue to enter the castle, press (4).

(2) – Wonderful! Now as Jude, you have begun your journey by flying the royal unicorn towards the ‘Cloud Castle’. Upon arrival at its gigantic gates, you see an old lady. To talk to the old lady press (6) or to continue to enter the castle, press (4).

(3) - Wonderful! Now as Julie, you have begun your journey towards the forbidden forest to fight the diabolic witch. You see two roads diverged into the woods, one full of thorns, lava lakes and a starving dragon. The second road seems pleasant, full of greenery and reminds you of holidays (without the homeworks). Press (4) to walk on the green terrain and relax. Press (1) to fight ordeals in the 1st road.

(3) – Wonderful! Now as Julie, you have begun your journey towards the forbidden forest to fight the diabolic witch. You see two roads diverged into the woods, one full of thorns, lava lakes and a starving dragon. The second road seems pleasant, full of greenery and reminds you of a holiday (without the homework). Press (4) to walk on the green terrain and relax. Press (1) to fight ordeals in the 1st road.

(4) - The path seemed fine (superficially) but alas had a black hole in the middle where you got trapped into the depths of nowhere and died. Try a different road! The End

(4) – The path seemed fine (superficially) but alas had a black hole in the middle where you got trapped into the depths of nowhere and died. Try a different road! The End

(6) - The old woman reveals her disguise and turns to be the witch. She kills you instantly and sends you to the graveyard. To restart the game as Julie, press (3).

(6) – The old woman reveals her disguise and turns to be the witch. She kills you instantly and sends you to the graveyard. To restart the game as Julie, press (3).

(1) - Gearing up for the ultimate battle of your life, you jumped towards the ferocious dragon realising it was just an illusion made by the witch. Escaping forward, you arrive towards the graveyard and find the prince charming tied and tortured. To fight the witch, Press (6) or to offer her a chance to rectify, press (7).

(1) – Gearing up for the ultimate battle of your life, you jumped towards the ferocious dragon realising it was just an illusion made by the witch. Escaping forward, you arrive towards the graveyard and find the prince charming tied and tortured. To fight the witch, Press (6) or to offer her a chance to rectify, press (7).

(8) - Are you kidding me? She knows how to hypnotise and vicious spells. Using her mystical abilities, she traps you inside a crystal ball for eternity. Try another path! The End

(8) – Are you kidding me? She knows how to hypnotise and vicious spells. Using her mystical abilities, she traps you inside a crystal ball for eternity. Try another path! The End

(7) - You chose right! The witch needed help. She gets a change of heart and hands over the prince to you peacefully. You return him to the royal couple. And the witch also reflects upon her deeds. Later that year you both get married and rule the kingdom happily ever after.

(7) – You chose right! The witch needed help. She gets a change of heart and hands over the prince to you peacefully. You return him to the royal couple. And the witch also reflects upon her deeds. Later that year you both get married and rule the kingdom happily ever after.

Parts List:

  1. Hand Puppet & Fabric Decorations- Dollarama
  2. Conductive Fabric – Prof. Kate Hartman
  3. Conductive Threads – Creatron Inc
  4. Felt Fabric – Dollarama
  5. Adafruit Playground Circuit & USB Cord – Creatron Inc

Circuit Diagram 

schematic-diagram_bb

 

 

Narrative Structure

web-1920-1

Link to code on GitHub

https://github.com/Rittika-Basu/Tell-Your-Own-Tale

Video

Wearability Assessment 

To decide which wearability criterias I should focus on, the following journal was referred.

Motti, Vivian Genaro, and Kelly Caine. “Human Factors Considerations In The Design Of Wearable Devices”. Proceedings Of The Human Factors And Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, vol 58, no. 1, 2014, pp. 1820-1824. SAGE Publications, doi:10.1177/1541931214581381. Accessed 4 Mar 2020.

I choose factors of ergonomics, user-friendliness, simplicity and responsiveness. In terms of ergonomics the hand puppet can be used by the parent. The buttons are to be placed at a reachable distance for the user (child). I used soft fabric and a simple interface for user-friendliness and simplicity. The engagement is straightforward and the materials are affordable. The responsiveness criteria is taken into consideration by integrating the interactive and responsive mechanism into the design, I.e.(Pressing the numbered buttons will trigger appearances of the illustrations). 

Challenges & Successes:

Initially, I was creating the code via Microsoft MakeCode which has an excellent library named ‘Keyboard’ which turns your Playground Circuit to a computer’s keyboard. It can type any characters and sentences with an effect of typewriting. But sadly this library could not have been implemented with Arduino and Processing. Since I was given feedback to create illustrations for storytelling. Thus, sending images via the capacitive sensors posed a new challenge to me. I looked into online resources for the coding part. Finally, I used Serial Communication to send one image, after the successful transmission of one illustration, I implemented the same coding for the remaining 7 illustrations.

Next Steps: 

I would have used a better camera for documentation (could have been borrowed from the AV Loans). I could have optimised my code for a better appeal if I had more help. Sometimes, constructive feedback from colleagues helps a design to evolve. Due to the COVID 19 pandemic, social isolation lowered my energy and socialising with colleagues. I might have used Copper tapes instead of conductive wires as I find them unreliable sometimes. 

References:

  1. Motti, Vivian Genaro, and Kelly Caine. “Human Factors Considerations In The Design Of Wearable Devices”. Proceedings Of The Human Factors And Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, vol 58, no. 1, 2014, pp. 1820-1824. SAGE Publications, doi:10.1177/1541931214581381. Accessed 4 Mar 2020.

We read this paper to assess the Human factors considerations in our designs. I choose four wearability criterias for my design. These are the principles of ergonomics, user-friendliness, simplicity and responsiveness.

2. Netflix, Inc. Black Mirror: Bandersnatch. 2020, https://www.netflix.com/ca/title/80988062. Accessed 8 Mar 2020.

3. Stine, Robert Lawrence. Give Yourself Goosebumps Series, Escape From The Carnival Of Horrors. 1st ed., Scholastic Inc., 1995. 

Ref. 2-3 are examples of Choose-Your-Own-Adventure-Narratives which gave me an idea of how my story should be structured.

4. Kapur, Arnav. “Project Overview ‹ Alterego – MIT Media Lab”. MIT Media Lab, 2018, https://www.media.mit.edu/projects/alterego/overview/. Accessed 16 Jan 2020

A brilliant project from the MIT Media Lab, linking the peripheral neural system with artificial intelligence allowing humans to communicate in non-verbal speech with technology. The user can express their thoughts without actually saying anything and getting their auditory perceptions disrupted. I wanted my user (kids) to choose the decisions via buttons and not by saying what kind of endings they expect.

5. Bandodkar, Priya. “E-Yoga Mat”. Advanced Wearable Electronics – Winter 2020, 2020, http://blog.ocad.ca/wordpress/digf3010-fw201903-01/2020/01/e-yoga-mat/. Accessed 1 Apr 2020. This is one of the projects of my classmates whose code I studied.

6. “Freepik | Discover The Best Free Graphic Resources About Children Illustrations, 38,713 Results”. Freepik, 2020, https://www.freepik.com/search?dates=any&format=search&page=1&query=children%20illustrations&sort=popular. Accessed 1 Apr 2020.

7. Krebs, Tara. “Artwork — The Art Of Tara Krebs”. The Art Of Tara Krebs, 2020, http://www.tarakrebs.com/artwork. Accessed 19 Mar 2020.

8. Suvorova, Anastasia. “Anastasia Suvorova”. Behance.Net, 2020, https://www.behance.net/ChaosEgo. Accessed 15 Mar 2020.

9. Tkach, Alena. “Alena Tkach”. Behance.Net, 2020, https://www.behance.net/alena_tkach. Accessed 15 Mar 2020.

Ref. 6-9: These are the online platforms I choose to study the children’s illustrations for my storybook creation process.

This entry was posted in Final Project. Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*
*

Use of this service is governed by the IT Acceptable Use and Web Technologies policies.
Privacy Notice: It is possible for your name, e-mail address, and/or student/staff/faculty UserID to be publicly revealed if you choose to use OCAD University Blogs.