Feel The Pressure

 

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Parts and Materials

materials

Parts

  1. Adafruit Circuit Playground Express
  2. Scissors
  3. Marker
  4. 10K ohm Resistor
  5. Alligator to alligator clips

Materials 

  1. Conductive Fabric (2 Pieces)
  2. Velostat (2 circular pieces)
  3. Handkerchief (Non-conductive fabric)
  4. Sewing Needle
  5. Black Sewing Thread
  6. Circle Marker
  7. Electrical tape

Circuit Diagram

feel_pressure

GitHub Code

Feel The Pressure Code

Step by Step Instructions

  1. Take the electrical tape and trace its shape on the two pieces of handkerchief with the marker. Cut out the shapes.
  2. Take the circle marker and trace the bigger side on the two pieces of Velostat. Cut out the shapes.
  3. Flip the circle marker and trace the smaller side onto both pieces of conductive fabric. Add tabs to the traced shape and cut out.
  4. Place cut out conductive fabric onto the handkerchief. Let the overhang tabs hang over the handkerchief. Sew the conductive fabric to the handkerchief.10
  5. Place the Velostat over one side of conductive fabric. Do not cover the tab. Place the other side of the conductive fabric side face down. The tabs should be on opposite sides. Sew around the edges of the handkerchief to attach the pieces together.11
  6. Sew the Circuit PlayGround Express and the analog sensor to the sock. Attach one alligator clip from one end of the tab on the analog sensor to 3.3V and another alligator clip from the opposite end of the tab to the a 10K ohm resistor. That resistor also has an alligator clip connected to Ground as well.ezgif-com-optimize

References

How to Make an E-Textile Analog Sensor. (2020, May 30). [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tA37mGEnPes

“Sensoria Artificial Intelligence Sportswear.” Sensoria Home Page, www.sensoriafitness.com/.

Light Signals

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LEDs are versatile and can be used for a variety of purposes. For some, LEDs help illuminate their surroundings and for others, this could be used as a visual indicator to alert others of their presence. These three prototypes all explore the latter use of the LEDs and explores how different types of gestures can be used to indicate visual feedback through the LEDs.

1. LED Biker Jacket

biker_jacket
Description

For this prototype, I created an LED Biker jacket. The idea behind this was for the LEDs to act as an indicator to alert all vehicles and road users to see bike riders at night. Since the jacket zip was conductive, I cut up two pieces of aluminum foil and pinned them each to two sides of the jacket. The two pieces of aluminum foil will come into contact with each other when the jacket is zipped up and touching both sides of the aluminum. When this happens, the LEDs light up indicating the presence of the biker. This prototype made use of clothing gestures.

Parts and Materials

LED bulbs

Alligator clips

Arduino microcontroller

Aluminum foil

Power bank

Jumper wires

Biker jacket

Full-sized breadboard

Detailed Photos
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Circuit
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Circuit on Jacket
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Jacket on hanger
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All Zipped Up
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Lights On

 

Discussion

Currently, the prototype makes use of LED bulbs which are simply taped to the jacket. For future iterations, I would make use of LED strips to have them more integrated as part of the jacket. Also, I believe a conductive thread would have worked better to help with the overall presentation of the prototype. Moving forward, I might need to get the Lilypad microcontroller to help with a more seamless design.

Code

Github

Circuit diagram

biker_jacket_bb

2. Biker Signal Gloves

led_gloves
Description

These LED light signal gloves are designed for cyclists to wear for their safety on the road. These arrow LED strips are controlled when the person wearing the gloves presses his/her index finger and thumb against each other. This activates the LEDs depending on which of the gloves is used. The left glove indicates a left turn signal, while the right glove indicates a right turn signal. This is used to show other commuters on the road when you want to turn left or right. To make this connection happen, I sewed on aluminum foil to the thumb and index finger portion of the glove and then made the connection from the breadboard through the use of alligator clips. This prototype makes use of body gestures, with the movement of the thumb and index finger to create the connection.

Parts and Materials

LED strips

Alligator clips

Arduino microcontroller

Aluminum foil

Power bank

Jumper wires

Gloves

Full-sized breadboard

 Detailed Photos
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Circuit
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Stitching up LED Strips
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Connecting circuit to LED strips
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LEDs off
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LEDs on; Left signal + Right signal
Discussion

I believe this was a successful prototype in terms of execution and how I intended it to work. However, the gloves are still too bulky and uncomfortable to wear due to it having to be connected to a power bank and breadboard in order to work. For future iterations, I think the use of a coin battery, as well as a Lilypad microcontroller, will make this prototype easily wearable and more functional as a final prototype. In addition, having the LEDs blink for some time after the signal will also be helpful and will make it easier for the cyclist who is having to ride and make the signal at the same time.

Code

Github

Circuit diagram

led_gloves

3. LED Footmat

led_foot
Description

The LED Footmat is a doormat that uses aluminum foil as a conductive material to light up an LED as a signal when someone arrives home. This prototype is an environment gesture that is activated when a person steps on the pressure point of the doormat. This pressure point is created by two pieces of aluminum foil that are connected to two sides of a piece of handkerchief and folded over each other. The two pieces of foil are separated by a piece of foam. This connection is a simple setup and can be used simply as a visual indicator for someone who arrives home late.

Parts and Materials

LED bulbs

Alligator clips

Arduino microcontroller

Aluminum foil

Power bank

Jumper wires

Handkerchief

Doormat

Foam

Full-sized breadboard

Detailed Photos
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Setting up tools
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Laying down conductive material; aluminum foil
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Connecting circuit to LEDs and aluminium foil
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Final Prototype: Outside
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Final Prototype: Inside
Discussion

This prototype was fairly simple to make and did not require a lot of materials or complex connections. However, I feel that there are some things I could have done better. I could have used conductive fabric and LED strips to sew into the doormat and this would have made for a more aesthetically pleasing experience and helped to hide some of the loose wires hanging. A future iteration to consider will be how to integrate sound into the experience. When the user steps on the mat, they will receive light and sound feedback as well.

Code

Github

Circuit Diagram

Same as LED Biker Jacket

Image Attribution

<div>Icons made by <a href=”https://www.freepik.com” title=”Freepik”>Freepik</a> from <a href=”https://www.flaticon.com/” title=”Flaticon”>www.flaticon.com</a></div>

Emote Masks

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION

During this COVID 19 pandemic, the new normal means now that masks are very much a part of our lives. From performing day to day tasks like going for a walk or a grocery shopping run, we always have to mask up. The introduction of masks has also brought with it its own set of problems. One thing that is widely disliked by most people, is the inability to see the bottom half of a person’s face. It is difficult to tell whether someone is angry, happy, or sad. In order to counteract this, I decided to create Emote Mask.

Emote Mask is a wearable device that uses LED lights to convey the emotions of the user. It is designed to be integrated seamlessly as part of a regular face mask. There are four LED strips located inside the mask which are all used to animate the mask. There are two different animations that can be loaded into the mask one at a time. (1) Blink and (2) Fade. Once a person, puts on the mask, all he/she has to do to get the animations going is to connect the Arduino to the power bank and simply power it on.

Emote Mask is an example of a wearable technology that belongs to the visual feedback and reachability category. The Emote Mask is placed in an easy-to-reach body location which is the mouth and the LED lights which provide the visual feedback can easily be seen.

PARTS & MATERIALS

(1) Arduino Nano 33 IOT

(4) LED Strips

(2) Alligator clips

(1) Full-sized breadboard

Jumper wires

Cotton sewn face mask

Soldering Iron

Scissors

DEMO VIDEO

Demo Video

DEVELOPMENT IMAGES

Parts & Materials
Parts & Materials
Soldered LED Strips
Soldered LED Strips
Arduino + LED Strips
Arduino + LED Strips
Mask + LED Strips
Mask + LED Strips

DEVELOPMENT VIDEO

Development Video

FINAL PROTOTYPE IMAGES

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Mask LED Light Off
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Mask LED Light On
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Final Prototype Off
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Final Prototype On

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM

led_strips

ARDUINO CODE LINK

Blink

Fade

PROJECT CONTEXT

Many designs have started popping up as a way to showcase people’s emotions behind the mask. Be it a mask with an actual picture of you or someone else’s mouth printed on the fabric or a transparent fabric to allow visual access. Some even have the LED lights light up matching the user’s mouth movements. Jabbermask can be mentioned as an example of such a product. The Jabbermask is an interactive voice-controlled facemask that allows users to express themselves. The mask is made up primarily of RGB LEDs, either AAA batteries or rechargeable batteries (depending on the model), and a voice-activated mic. The LED lights change based on how the mouth is moving, with simple physical commands like popping the lips displaying simple words, emojis, or smiles. Most authentically though, the mouth can also move in time with the mouth of the user, emulating the physical action of the lips underneath. In addition, users can pick from a selection of emojis, words, letters, and symbols to display on their face masks. Similar to this, the Emote Mask also makes use of LED strips for its lighting. However, it does not utilize the voice control aspect of the Jabbermask.

Another related example is a facemask with LED animations from a Youtube channel called Nerdforge. This prototype is made up of addressable LED strips, an Arduino, an SD card reader, a power bank, along with a face mask. The LED light animations are triggered when the Arduino is connected to the power bank. The animations are first created using a custom Webapp built by Nerdforge, then loaded onto an SD card connected to the Arduino. The Arduino then reads the built-in animations from the SD Card and outputs them through the LED lights. The Webapp allows the user to customize their own animations in any way they want. The Emote mask was based directly on this particular example, with the way it uses the blink and fade as animations.

The last example which I found is an example of a good concept which I feel was not well constructed. While parsing through the internet for examples, I found this LED face mask prototype which was created by a Bengal man. This prototype makes use of LED bulbs as a decoration around the mask and acts as a sign for people not wearing masks. Although the use of LEDs is a creative way to encourage the wearing of masks, I feel that this mask does not offer the same level of creativity and usefulness compared to the other examples mentioned previously.

Bibliography

Coggan, Georgia. “Incredible New Face Mask Displays Your Emotions.” Creative Bloq, September 7, 2020. https://www.creativebloq.com/news/led-face-mask.
Ghosh, Raya. “Bengal Man Makes LED Face Mask to Protect Himself from Coronavirus. Watch Video.” India Today, July 20, 2020. https://www.indiatoday.in/trending-news/story/bengal-man-makes-led-face-mask-to-protect-himself-from-coronavirus-watch-video-1702381-2020-07-20.
Nerdforge. Making a Face Mask with ANIMATIONS!!, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MNogUc4_8GM.
Zeagler, Clint. “Where to Wear It.” Proceedings of the 2017 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers, 2017, doi:10.1145/3123021.3123042.