Safe & Secure by Nishu

prototype-3

Project Description

Light has always been used as an object or medium to help, direct, signal, assist and inform us on a particular status or situation. It is used in different colours and forms  that help translate our language into a visual and simple medium. Using this medium I have chosen to build three Body-Environmental Switches that all revolve around an overarching theme of Safety & Security. These switches activate LED lights when a person interacts with their environments. 

The reason I have picked this theme is because I have drawn inspiration from three incidents that have occured in my life in the past month. A common point between all these situations was that they occurred due to a lack of a visual cue. In the presence of light signals, people would have been more aware of their environment and the situation they were in. Hence be able to avoid these situations accordingly. 

 

1- Door lock sensor (Dragonbolt)

door-sensor

Description:

The first incident that occurred was three weeks ago when someone broke into my house. As all doors and windows in my house are sliding mechanisms, unlike a regular door with a hinge there is no obvious way to know when these kinds of doors are locked. Most doors of this nature generally indicate that the door is locked with a clipping sound as you close it. But many a time while closing these doors, if not shut with the right force the door remains unlocked. I chose to intervene here with a door sensor that replaces the audio cue for a locked door with a visual one. So when the door is shut properly, the LED light comes on. This also helps indicate from a distance when a door is unlocked.

The sensor uses a simple mechanism of a bridge switch such that, when the door is pushed to the right distance, the circuit closes and the  LED is turned on. With the help of a small piece of copper on the sliding door, it completes the circuit on the door frame, turning on the LED. To also aesthetically present the LED, I have propped it onto a copper dragonfly model that can be mounted on a wall close to these doors. 

 

Parts & Materials:

Parts

  1. Arduino Nano 33 IOT
  2. Red LED
  3. USB charger
  4. Breadboard
  5. Jumper wires
  6. Alligator to alligator clips 

Materials

  1. Copper tape
  2. Metal dragonfly
  3. Double sided tape

 

Detailed images:

1 2 3 4

Discussion:

At the moment the prototype does consist of a lot of wiring as I needed to conceal the breadboard and the laptop that is powering it. In the next iterations I would work towards using a 3V battery as a power source and create a compact unit entirely around the dragonfly so it can be instantly installed anywhere. I would also like to find a replacement for the copper tapes that are holding the jumper wires with a conductive sticky pad that can be easily installed on the door frame. 

 

2- Baby back sensor (Sleepeasy)

baby-sensor

Description:

The second incident that occurred was a month ago while having some friends and their new born baby over. Just as they walked in they laid their baby boy down on the bed. Being new parents and having read all the books on how to raise and take care of the baby, they alternately took turns to check on him. They were most concerned to see whether he was always sleeping on his back. It was then that they told me that in spite of the baby sleeping in a crib in the same room as them, they constantly needed to wake up at night to make sure that he is always sleeping on his back. This is to prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) It is the unexplained death, usually during sleep, of a seemingly healthy baby less than a year old. SIDS is sometimes known as crib death because the infants often die in their cribs. Having this constant fear of the death of their child sounded horrible. 

And so my second intervention is a Sleepeasy baby pad that uses a push button mechanism. The pad is meant to be kept under the baby and as long as the baby is on its back, the weight of the baby touches the surfaces together, lighting up the LED. The lit LED will always inform the parent that the child is on its back. If the baby were to roll off, the surfaces would separate and the LED would go off.  

 

Parts & Materials:

Parts

  1. Arduino Nano 33 IOT
  2. Red LED
  3. USB charger
  4. Breadboard
  5. Jumper wires
  6. 6. Alligator to alligator clips 

Materials

  1. Copper tape
  2. Aluminium foil
  3. Thin foam paper
  4. Origami paper

 

Detailed images:

1 2 3 4

Discussion:

Currently the prototype uses aluminium foil as the conductive surface and an LED on the breadboard. Even though the aluminium was stretched it does not go back to its original state as the weight is relieved. This causes the LED to flicker as it transitions between states. The next iteration would look for alternatives for this surface and work at incorporating the light within the sleep pad. With the help of Lilypad LEDs or even LED strips, I would be able to incorporate them within the thickness of the sleep pad.

 

3- Sanitize please

sanitizer-sensor

Description:

Having just recovered from COVID-19 has made me more cautious and more worried for my loved ones. As time passes, the world is getting back to normal but people still seem to forget that we are in the midst of a pandemic. My mother being an interior designer often has a lot of her team members and vendors come over. But often they forget to sanitize their hands as they enter the house. In order to keep enforcing this protocol, I have decided to create a sanitizing station that visually captures their attention as they enter.  

With the simple use of a bridge switch, I have created a platform to place a sanitizer on. As long as the sanitizer is on the platform, the LED stays on and captures people’s attention as they enter.

 

Parts & Materials:

Parts

  1. Arduino Nano 33 IOT
  2. Red LED
  3. USB charger
  4. Breadboard
  5. Jumper wires

Materials

  1. Copper tape
  2. Wooden block
  3. Thin foam paper

 

Detailed images:

1 2 3 4

Discussion:

Currently the prototype uses copper tape to complete the circuit. I did face some difficulty in attaching the jumper wires on the side. As the pins of the wire are straight, I need to bend them a bit to come in contact with the copper tape. That caused a bit of a loose connection. In my next iteration, I would like to replace the copper tape on the bottom of the bottle with an adaptable base that can be used on sanitizers of different sizes.

 

Arduino code for all 3 prototypes

https://github.com/AbhishekNishu16/Body-Centric-Tech-Prototype-3.git

 

Circuit diagram for all 3 prototypescircuit-diagram

Light Signals

slide1

LEDs are versatile and can be used for a variety of purposes. For some, LEDs help illuminate their surroundings and for others, this could be used as a visual indicator to alert others of their presence. These three prototypes all explore the latter use of the LEDs and explores how different types of gestures can be used to indicate visual feedback through the LEDs.

1. LED Biker Jacket

biker_jacket
Description

For this prototype, I created an LED Biker jacket. The idea behind this was for the LEDs to act as an indicator to alert all vehicles and road users to see bike riders at night. Since the jacket zip was conductive, I cut up two pieces of aluminum foil and pinned them each to two sides of the jacket. The two pieces of aluminum foil will come into contact with each other when the jacket is zipped up and touching both sides of the aluminum. When this happens, the LEDs light up indicating the presence of the biker. This prototype made use of clothing gestures.

Parts and Materials

LED bulbs

Alligator clips

Arduino microcontroller

Aluminum foil

Power bank

Jumper wires

Biker jacket

Full-sized breadboard

Detailed Photos
img_8174
Circuit
img_8182
Circuit on Jacket
img_8184
Jacket on hanger
img_8210
All Zipped Up
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Lights On

 

Discussion

Currently, the prototype makes use of LED bulbs which are simply taped to the jacket. For future iterations, I would make use of LED strips to have them more integrated as part of the jacket. Also, I believe a conductive thread would have worked better to help with the overall presentation of the prototype. Moving forward, I might need to get the Lilypad microcontroller to help with a more seamless design.

Code

Github

Circuit diagram

biker_jacket_bb

2. Biker Signal Gloves

led_gloves
Description

These LED light signal gloves are designed for cyclists to wear for their safety on the road. These arrow LED strips are controlled when the person wearing the gloves presses his/her index finger and thumb against each other. This activates the LEDs depending on which of the gloves is used. The left glove indicates a left turn signal, while the right glove indicates a right turn signal. This is used to show other commuters on the road when you want to turn left or right. To make this connection happen, I sewed on aluminum foil to the thumb and index finger portion of the glove and then made the connection from the breadboard through the use of alligator clips. This prototype makes use of body gestures, with the movement of the thumb and index finger to create the connection.

Parts and Materials

LED strips

Alligator clips

Arduino microcontroller

Aluminum foil

Power bank

Jumper wires

Gloves

Full-sized breadboard

 Detailed Photos
img_8259
Circuit
img_8234
Stitching up LED Strips
img_8249
Connecting circuit to LED strips
img_3667
LEDs off
img_3665
LEDs on; Left signal + Right signal
Discussion

I believe this was a successful prototype in terms of execution and how I intended it to work. However, the gloves are still too bulky and uncomfortable to wear due to it having to be connected to a power bank and breadboard in order to work. For future iterations, I think the use of a coin battery, as well as a Lilypad microcontroller, will make this prototype easily wearable and more functional as a final prototype. In addition, having the LEDs blink for some time after the signal will also be helpful and will make it easier for the cyclist who is having to ride and make the signal at the same time.

Code

Github

Circuit diagram

led_gloves

3. LED Footmat

led_foot
Description

The LED Footmat is a doormat that uses aluminum foil as a conductive material to light up an LED as a signal when someone arrives home. This prototype is an environment gesture that is activated when a person steps on the pressure point of the doormat. This pressure point is created by two pieces of aluminum foil that are connected to two sides of a piece of handkerchief and folded over each other. The two pieces of foil are separated by a piece of foam. This connection is a simple setup and can be used simply as a visual indicator for someone who arrives home late.

Parts and Materials

LED bulbs

Alligator clips

Arduino microcontroller

Aluminum foil

Power bank

Jumper wires

Handkerchief

Doormat

Foam

Full-sized breadboard

Detailed Photos
img_8260
Setting up tools
img_8267
Laying down conductive material; aluminum foil
img_8275
Connecting circuit to LEDs and aluminium foil
img_3668
Final Prototype: Outside
img_3669
Final Prototype: Inside
Discussion

This prototype was fairly simple to make and did not require a lot of materials or complex connections. However, I feel that there are some things I could have done better. I could have used conductive fabric and LED strips to sew into the doormat and this would have made for a more aesthetically pleasing experience and helped to hide some of the loose wires hanging. A future iteration to consider will be how to integrate sound into the experience. When the user steps on the mat, they will receive light and sound feedback as well.

Code

Github

Circuit Diagram

Same as LED Biker Jacket

Image Attribution

<div>Icons made by <a href=”https://www.freepik.com” title=”Freepik”>Freepik</a> from <a href=”https://www.flaticon.com/” title=”Flaticon”>www.flaticon.com</a></div>

Body Gesture Signal-By Jessy

 

cover

  1. Visible Pulse

 

 

 

 

 

Description

Visible Pulse is an installation that combines the finger and the wrist as a trigger to switch on. The wrists are the more flexible part of our body and the place where we can feel the pulse. Whenever the finger touches the wrist, the LED on the switch starts to blink, which can be considered as a simulation of the pulse. The working principle is based on a touch sensor (Adafruit MPR121) and using a skin surface that is conductive, as a basic switch.

1-1 1-2

Code link:

Prototype 3-1: https://github.com/xinzhang-jessy/bodygesturesignal.git

 

2.Idea Bracelet

Description

Idea Bracelet is also based on a touch sensor (Adafruit MPR121), there are normal material and conductive material that covered the third finger. When snap fingers (usually using the third finger), the LEDs embedded on the bracelet will be sequential light up. Whenever we get a new idea, we may snap our fingers involuntarily. The emotion brought by this action is dynamic and happy, so I use this action as a switch to trigger the LEDs.

2-1 2-2Code link:

Prototype 3-2: https://github.com/xinzhang-jessy/bodygesturesignal.git

3. Running signal

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description

This is a wearable installation that being triggered by running and the working principle is also realized by the touch sensor (Adafruit MPR121). Running is an ordinary activity and people usually swing their arms during running. Basing on this regulation, I use running gesture as a trigger of this wearable insulation. Firstly, sew the conductive fabric onto ordinary clothes, and installed an LED matrix as signal output. Whenever taking action of swing arms, the LED matrix will be light up.

3-1 3-2

Code link:

Prototype 3-3: https://github.com/xinzhang-jessy/bodygesturesignal.git

Discussion

In this series of prototypes, I found the body as an interesting switch, and I began to pay attention to movements that are often overlooked, especially gestures, like when we tap our fingers, that is probably we are waiting for something, or we seldom feel the change of facial expressions. These actions sometimes can be an indication of the internal change which may be missed by ourselves. In my work, I want to use a simple action or gesture as a switch to trigger the installation and I think there should be more sensors being applied, such as pulse detection. More specifically, in the first work, the Visible Pulse, at present, the signal can not be exactly a real one without pulse detection. So for further modification, I need a pulse detection sensor to obtain real data and convert it into the visible LED signal. When each finger touches the wrist, it will reflect a real pulse signal.

Hello: The Social Distance Greetings by Trish

‘Social Distance’ has become the new buzz word of the decade not being able to hug, shake hands or even stand too close. For this prototype I have tried to redefine how people can say hello to each other in interesting ways borrowing ideas from the Black Panther movie and the pandemic greetings.

1.The Wakanda Hello

Interactive GIF

7c8b4778-2063-49a8-bcf3-96ad27d20836

Description

The Wakanda Hello is a pair of gloves that uses conductive materials to light an LED to signal that someone is gesturing hello. This prototype is a body gesture of one crossing hands on the chest, it has two coins attached to a pair of gym gloves that when they come into contact an LED lights up.

As we have changed the way in which we now say hello due to the pandemic the Wakanda Hello makes for a fun way for people to greet each other. The connection is simple and straightforward and could also be an interesting way to say hello to people even over video calls.

Materials and Parts
Gym Gloves
Double Sided Tape
Alligator Clips
Full Size Breadboard
Arduino Nano 33 IoT
Jumper Wires
LilyPad Tri-Color LED
Wires
USB cable
Coins

Discussion

This prototype was quite interesting to work on, some of the challenges I faced was finding materials I could work with but managed to improvise with what I have. As a future iteration I would hope to make the connection less bulky and with less wires which would get tangled up during testing, as well as add different light modes to indicate someone’s mood. Some of the things that worked was the gesture was quite seamless and the idea of using coins as the conductive material was fun to work with.

Detail Images

img_9471 img_9472img_6103 img_6104 img_6105 img_6108

Circuit Diagram

the-wakanda-hello-_bb

2.The Elbow Hello

Interactive GIF

image

Description

The elbow greeting has become the new normal in an effort to help reduce the spread of the Coronavirus. The Elbow Hello is a prototype I made using a pair of old socks for the stretch material, its worn just below the elbow and has a social switch. I used aluminum foil as the conductive material that lights up an LED when someone’s elbow bumps with someone else to complete the circuit.

Materials and Parts
Masking Tape
Socks
Felt
Double Sided Tape
Alligator Clips
Full Size Breadboard
Arduino Nano 33 IoT
Jumper Wires
White LEDs
Wires
USB cable
Aluminum foil  

Discussion

This prototype was a bit difficult to work with especially when making the prototype it required some improvisation with materials and alot of try and error. The finishing wasn’t very clean but it worked well in terms of interactivity, I would like to further explore a less bulky iteration with no wires hanging loosely.

Detail Images 

img_9404 img_9399img_6113 img_6117

Circuit Diagram

the-elbow-hello_bb

3.The Mask Hello

Interactive GIF

5d6cbde9-18e4-43a9-ba3a-10489cc2201a

Description

For this third prototype I used a mask as it has now become a part of our daily outfits whenever we go outside. The idea for this was to have LEDs create a smiley face at the front of someone’s mask to signal a hello when the LEDs light up. I made a button switch in between the masks lining using felt and aluminum foil so when the two pads of the button come into contact the LEDs light up.

Materials and Parts
Masking Tape
Surgical Mask
Felt
Double Sided Tape
Alligator Clips
Full Size Breadboard
Arduino Nano 33 IoT
Jumper Wires
Green LEDs
Wires
USB cable
Aluminum foil  

Discussion

Some of the challenges I face in this prototype was figuring out what would be the best connection for the switch, initially I had thought of a contact switch but the design didn’t quite work out when it came to execution. The second challenge I faced especially not having conductive thread was connecting the LEDs but I managed to improvise with a conductive wire. Overall the prototype came out well and it was a great learning experience seeing what worked and what needed to be improved.

Detail Images 

img_9428 img_9424img_6123 img_6124 img_6121 img_6127

Circuit Diagram

the-mask-hello_bb

Code hosted on Github

https://github.com/kananamwenda/Hello-The-Social-Distance-Greetings

Ergonomic Monitors by Grace Yuan

cover

As an Interior Designer who has spent a lot of time working with furniture and space, I have a deep understanding of the ergonomic measurements of human bodies and how our bodies interact with the environment. Therefore I built the following three ergonomic monitors to help the user keep up a good ergonomic habit, stay healthy and work efficiently. All of the three prototypes are Body/Environmental Switches that are activated by the interactions between the user’s body and their environment, using LED lights as indicators.

The inspiration also comes from my real working experience. When I used to sit in the office for the entire day, my colleagues and I always reminded each other to correct the postures every time we walked past by each other’s desk. Posture is so important and also so easy to be forgotten. I hope this prototype I made can be further developed into a real product that can help computer users to stay away from any physical pains caused by the wrong posture.

1.Sitting Posture Monitor – Back

Demo GIF

demo-3-1-480-trimmed

full video: https://youtu.be/T3oyveVMJ-g

Description

Sitting Posture Monitor – Back is an ergonomic reminder that helps the user to correct their posture when sitting at a task chair. No matter it’s at home or in an office, keeping a good sitting posture is always important. There are many cases of computer users getting back pain, neck pain, and shoulder pain because of the wrong posture. Leaning against the chair back is a significant part of the correct sitting posture. By doing so, the user released the weight to the chair and gained the support of the back and the lower back. It also keeps the user’s head straight and up, preventing the user from getting neck pain. 

This device is a straightforward indicator of whether the user is leaning on the back of the chair. It is a Body/Environmental Switch that is triggered by the interaction between the user’s shoulder/back and their chair. When the user’s shoulder or upper back touches the top of the chair back, releasing pressure on the device sensor switch, the red light turned off. When the user is not leaning against the back of the chair, which means there is no pressure on the switch, the red LED light turns on, reminding the user to adjust their sitting posture. The switch is made of conductive copper tapes and aluminum foil, wrapped with acrylic felt. The felt is in a grey color which blends in with the grey mesh material of the back of the chair perfectly.

Materials and Parts

Acrylic felt
Copper tapes
Velcro tapes
Regular threads
Aligator Clips
Half breadboard
Arduino Nano 33 IOT
Extension jumper wires
Red LED light
Wires
USB cable
Aluminum foil  

Detailed Photos
img_1494 img_1499 img_1505img_1562
Discussion

Currently, the circuits and wires are all exposed which becomes a tripping hazard. For future iteration, I would solder the wires to the Arduino, and hide the wires inside the mesh back of the chair. For a more advanced application, the switch can be built in a way that is completely integrated into the chair, and the LED light will be recessed on the tip of the armrest.

2.Sitting Posture Monitor – Legs

Demo GIF

demo-3-3-480_3

Description

Sitting Posture Monitor – Legs is an ergonomic reminder that helps the user to correct their leg posture when sitting in a chair. The concept is similar to the last prototype, to monitor the user’s movement and warn them once a bad posture is detected.

From a personal perspective, I often find myself sitting with my legs crossed. This is actually a bad habit because such a position usually promotes a bad posture and can cause a temporary increase in blood pressure. With this leg position, it is difficult to sit up straight.

The monitor device is a strap to wear around the user’s thigh. As soon as the user crosses their legs, the other leg puts pressure on the one leg wearing the device, the device will be activated. A red LED light will turn on to remind the user of their leg posture.

Materials and Parts

Acrylic felt
Copper tapes
Velcro tapes
Regular threads
Aligator Clips
Half breadboard
Arduino Nano 33 IOT
Extension jumper wires
Red LED light
Wires
USB cable
Aluminum foil

Detailed Photos

img_1540 img_1554

Discussion

The device is a bit too large right now. It may be too much work for the user to wear this device. For the next iteration, I would minimize the scale and improve the design to be more flexible and portable. Another potential improvement will be the pairing the device. Based on common experience, one person would cross their legs both ways – the left leg on the top or the right leg on the top. It’s necessary to consider making the device into a pair for both legs, so the user’s leg movements will be fully detected.

3.Wrist Rest Monitor

Demo GIF

demo-3-2-480

Description

Wrist Rest Monitor is an ergonomic device that reminds mouse users to place their wrist against the surface while providing cushion to reduce the wrist fatigue. Wrist rest pads are known for reducing existing wrist pain and help prevent the user from developing Carpal Tunnel.

It is a Body/Environmental Switch that is triggered by the interaction between the user’s wrist and the wrist rest. When the user’s wrist is leaning against the wrist rest, releasing pressure on the device sensor switch, the red light turned off. When the user’s wrist is not leaning against the wrist rest, which means there is no pressure on the switch, the red LED light turns on, reminding the user to relax their wrist.

Materials and Parts

Acrylic felt
Copper tapes
Velcro tapes
Regular threads
Aligator Clips
Half breadboard
Arduino Nano 33 IOT
Extension jumper wires
Red LED light
Wires
USB cable
Conductive threads
Aluminum foil

Detailed Photos

img_1513 img_1519 img_1520 img_1521

Discussion

Alligator clips are used to power the device. For future iteration, I would solder the wires to the Arduino, hide the wires inside the wrist rest, power the circuit with a coin cell, and fill the wrist rest with more cotton for cushioning.

Arduino Code 

The first and the third prototypes:

https://github.com/graceyuanjq/Ergonomic-Monitors/blob/main/Arduino%20Code%201%263

The second prototype:

https://github.com/graceyuanjq/Ergonomic-Monitors/blob/main/Arduino%20Code%202

Circuit Diagram For All Three Prototypes

circuit