First Flight (An Interactive Paper Airplane Experience.)

Experiment 3:

By: Georgina Yeboah

Here’s the Github link: https://github.com/Georgiedear/CNCExperiment3

 

First Flight. (An Interactive Paper Airplane Experience. 2018)

Figure 1.”First Flight. (An Interactive Paper Airplane Experience, 2018)” Photo taken at OCADU Grad Gallery.

First Flight (FF) (2018), is an interactive tangible experience where users use a physical paper airplane to control the orientation of the sky to appear they are flying with the screen, while attempting to fly through as many virtual hoops as they can.

Fig 2. Georgina Yeboah. 2018 "First Flight Demo at OCADU Grad Gallery."

Figure 2. “First Flight Demo at OCADU Grad Gallery.” 2018

 

Fig 2. Georgina Yeboah 2018. "First Flight Demo at OCADU Grad Gallery."

Figure 3.  First Flight Demo at OCADU Grad Gallery ( 2018).

Video Link: https://vimeo.com/300453454

The Tech:

The installation includes:

  • x1 Arduino Micro
  • x1 Bono 55 Orientation Sensor
  • x1 Breadboard
  • x1 Laptop
  • A Couple of Wires
  • Female Headers
  • 5 Long Wires (going from the breadboard to Bono 55)
  • A Paper Airplane

Process Journal:

Thursday Nov 1st, 2018: Brainstorming to a settled idea.

Concept: Exploring Embodiment with Tangibles Using a Large Monitor or Screen. 

I thought about a variety of ideas leading up to the airplane interaction:

  1. Using a physical umbrella as an on or off switch to change the state of a projected animation. If the umbrella was closed it would be sunny. However if it were open the projection would show an animation of rain.
  2. Picking up objects to detect a change in distance (possibly using an ultrasonic sensor.) I could prompt different animations to trigger using objects. (For example; picking up sunglasses from a platform would trigger a beach scene projection in the summer.)
  3.  I also thought about using wind/breathe as an input to trigger movement to virtual objects but was unsure of where or how to get the sensor for it.
  4. I later thought about using the potentiometer and creating a clock that triggers certain animations to represent the time of day. A physical ferris wheel that would control a virtual one and cause some sort of animation was also among my earliest ideas.
Fig 2. Georgina Yeboah. 2018. First initial ideas of embodiment.

Figure 4. First initial ideas of embodiment.

 

Fig 3. Georgina Yeboah. 2018 "Considering virtual counterpart of airplane or not."

Figure 5. Considering virtual counterparts of airplane or not.

Monday Nov 5th, 2018:

Explored and played with shapes in 3D space using the WEBGL feature in P5.js. I learned a lot about WEBGL and it’s Z  axis’s properties.

Fig 5. Georgina Yeboah, Screenshot of Airplane.Js code.

Figure 6. Screenshot of Airplane.Js code.

I looked at the camera properties and reviewed it’s syntax from the “Processing P3D” document by Daniel Shiffman. Later, I would plan to set the CSS background’s gradient and later attach the orientation sensor to control the camera instead of my mouse.

Fig x. Georgina Yeboah (2018). "Camera syntax in WEBGL. Controls the movement of the camera with mouseX and MouseY."

Figure 7. Camera syntax in WEBGL. Controls the movement of the camera with mouseX and MouseY.

 

Fig x. Georgina Yeboah. 2018. "First Flight's Interface using WEBGL."

Figure 8. First Flight’s Interface using WEBGL.

Tuesday Nov 6th, 2018.

I had planned to add cloud textures for the sky but never found the time to do so. I did manage to add my gradient background though using CSS. 

I also planned to add obstacles to make getting hoops challenging but I didn’t include it due to time restraints and prioritization and thought it be best suited for future work.

Tuesday Nov 8th, 2018.

The eve before the critique, I had successfully soldered long wires to the female head that would be attached to the Bono 55 orientation sensor. The sensor would sit nicely on the top of the paper airplane head, covered with extra paper. On the other end, the sensor would connect to a breadboard where the Arduino Micro would sit on.

Fig 6. Georgina Yeboah. 2018. Bono 55 Orientation sensor sits nicely on top of paper airplane.

Figure 9. Bono 55 Orientation sensor sits nicely on top of paper airplane.

References and Inspirations:

I wanted to play with the idea of embodiment. Since I’ve worked with VR systems in cohesion with tangible objects for awhile, I wanted to re-visit  those kind of design ideas but instead of immersive VR I wanted to use a screen. A monitor big enough to carry out the task of engagement seemed simpler enough to explore this idea of play with a paper airplane.

I looked online for inspiring graphics to help me start building my world. I wanted this to be a form of play so I wanted the world I’d fly through to be as playful and dynamically engaging as possible while flying.

PaperPlanes:

Paper Planes by Active Theory created a web application for the Google I/O event back in 2016 (Active Theory). It was an interactive web based activity where guests at the event could send and receive digital airplanes from their phones by gesturing a throw to a larger monitor. Digital paper airplanes could be thrown and received across 150 countries (Active Theory). The gesture of creating and throwing in order to engage with a larger whole through a monitor inspired the idea to explore my project’s playful gesture of play and interactivity.

Fig. 8. Active Theory. (2016). Paper plane's installation at the Google I/O event.

Figure. 10. Active Theory. (2016). Paper Plane’s online web based installation .

The CodePad:

This website features a lot of programmed graphics and interactive web elements. I happened to come across this WEBGL page by chance and was inspired by the shapes and gradients of the world it created.

(Fig 4. Codepad. (n.d) "WebGL Gradient". Retrieved from https://codepad.co/snippet/xC6SberG

(Figure 11. Meyer, Chris. (n.d) “WebGL Gradient”. Retrieved from https://codepad.co/snippet/xC6SberG

 

P5.Js Reference with WEBGL:

I found that  the Torus (the donut) was a apart of the WEBGL and next to the Cone, I thought they would be interesting shapes to play and style with. The Torus would wind up becoming my array of hoops for the airplane to fly through.

 

screen-shot-2018-11-12-at-11-56-41-pm

Figure 12. P5.Js. (n.d) “Geometries” Retrieved from https://p5js.org/examples/3d-geometries.html

Future work:

Currently, the project has many iterations and features I would like to add or expand on. I would like to finalize the environment and create a scoring system so that the user can collect points when they go through a hoop. The more hoops you go through the more points you get. Changing the gradient background of the environment after a period of time would also be a feature I would like to work on. I believe there is a lot of potential in First flight that can eventually become a fully playful and satisfying experience with a paper airplane.

References 

3D Models. Cgtrader. (2011-2018). Similar free VR / AR / Low Poly 3D Models. Retrieved from

https://www.cgtrader.com/free-3d-models/exterior/landscape/low-poly-clouds-pack-1

ActiveTheory. (nd). Paperplanes. Retrieved from https://activetheory.net/work/paper-planes 

Dunn, James. (2018). Getting Started with WebGL in P5. Retrieved on Nov 12th 2018 from   

https://github.com/processing/p5.js/wiki/Getting-started-with-WebGL-in-p5

McCarthy, Lauren. (2018). Geometries. P5.js Examples. Retrieved from https://p5js.org/examples/3d-geometries.html

Meyer, Chris.(2018). WebGl Gradient. Codepad. Retrieved from https://codepad.co/snippet/xC6SberG

Paperplanes. (n.d). Retrieved from https://paperplanes.world/

Shiffman, Daniel. (n.d). P3D. Retrieved from https://processing.org/tutorials/p3d/

W3Schools.(1999-2018). CSS Gradients. Retrieved from https://www.w3schools.com/css/css3_gradients.asp