odd accessories for obscure body parts

This is the collection No Reference by fashion designer Christophe Coppens. It’s low-tech but like our Whole Body Project deals with those often forgotten parts of our corpuses. More info can be found on Facebook and We Make Money Not Art.

* The Heart Chakra * by Katherine, Hilary and Ken


*The Chakras. Digital image. Seven Chakras Balancing Meditation. Web. 22 Jan. 2011. <http://www.illuminatetoday.com/yoga/sevan-chakras-balancing-meditation.html>.

Why we chose the area or body part that we did?
The part of the body that was chosen for this assignment was the Heart Chakra also known as the Anahata. ‘The energy of the Anahata influences the heart, lungs, thymus, blood and circulation, skin and touch.  In addition, it plays a significant role in circulating energy throughout the body’ 1 (De, Long).  Although this is not a physical part of the body, many people try to open and feel their Anahata by practicing yoga and reiki. This tunic illustrates the Anahata when the user practice’s a Reiki position by placing their hand just below the chest and applying a small about of pressure inorder to allow the LEDS to light up.  The Reiki positions where found on  the wesite Reiki- Reiki Healing Made Easy,under the artical Reiki Hand Treatment- for self healing: http://www.reiki.nu/treatment/treatment.html.  The position chosen for this assignment was : B(3) Brest Position.  The members of our group practice’s or have practiced Yoga or Reiki. We commonly found the relationship between the physical body and the non physical body interesting.

What was the rationale to our approach to sensing or listening to the Heart Chakra?
This non physical part of the body is mainly visualized and not actually seen.  By creating a garment that lights up the heart chakra when placed in a Reiki position, this visualization is turn into a visual form that cannot be seen by the user. The form of a tunic which is a common garment of clothing worn when practicing Yoga and Reiki seemed appropriate foundation for this piece. By keeping traditional linen clothing and incorporating technology into it, the art of Reiki is being respected and represented in it’s original form as well as taking it to the next level of wearable technologies. This  mental visualization is important in the art of Reiki inorder to achieve openness of the heart chakra.
Relevant research or experiences
Research that was undertaken for this assignment was:
Yoga positions – what opens the heart Chakra ( this positions involved a larger portion of the body and did not seen suitable for this assignment. ) ** possible future explorations.
Chakra’s– there meanings, positions on the body, what they do, and symbols that related to each Chakra.
Reiki Positions –  what position opened up the Anahata and there relationship to the body
Soft switches– to turn the Chakra on and off without having to have sleeves on the Tunique
Clothing that is worn during yoga

Prototyping Process and Approch

  1. A pattern for the foundation garment was created (see Figure 2-5)
  2. The  2 of each pattern piece was  cut out of of linen and sew together.
  3. The symbol of the heart chakra was painted on the outer layer of the garment. This is used to defuse the harshness of the LED Lights that are place on the inside layer of the tunic.
  4. A parallel circuit was created for the LED Lights and the Soft switches – making sure that all the connections had an appropriate placement on the body. 
    *See post from Ken
  5. Two soft switches where designed and developed on the chest in order to allow the LEDS to light up when you placed your body in the Reiki pose shown in Fig 1 . 
    *See post from Ken

Figure 2                                                                                                      Figure 3
 Tools: Sewing Machine, Paint brush
Scissors,Hot Glue Gun and,
Needle Nose Pliers

 

 

 

 Figure 4

Material:White Linen,White Cotton, Thread Coin battery,Coin battery pack, 6 LEDS, Wire, Hot glue, Conductive fabric, and Silk Screen Paint.

 

 

 

Improvements and Future Applications:
*
Make the LEDS More Visable by using a clear base pigment.
* Place the Leds in  a pattern or circluar formation.
* Use electrical thread to make connections
* Make the soft switch’s reaction more pressure senstive.
*Whole body Chakra visualization.
* Make the reaction something that is internal and felt by the user and not seen by the viewer.

  1. De, Long Douglas. “Chapter 6 : The Chakra System.” Ancient Teachings for Beginners: Auras, Chakras, Angels, Rebirth, Astral Projection. 1st ed. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 2000. 114-20. Print. 4th Printing
  2. Sandwall, Goran. “Reiki Treatment for Mind, Body and Spirit.” Reiki.nu – Reiki Healing Made Easy!1999-2009. Web. 17 Jan. 2011. <http://www.reiki.nu>.

 
  *Video of  Our Class Critique On  01/25/2011 will be posted at a later date.


The Shoulder

Our concept for the Whole Body Project was to use a sensor to measure your swing follow through. The practical applications for this concept could range from squash, tennis to golf and hockey. This is a tool that would be used by the athlete to train them to follow through their swing fully. this would ensure that the athlete wouldn’t hurt themselves by stopping short in their follow through and improves the shot.

Our initial plan was to use a stretch sensor to measure how far you were following though and use LEDs to display how far you stretched out. Unfortunately we lost the stretch sensor and we were forced to improvise.

After Reviewing what choices we had left we decided to create a pressure sensitive soft sensor using the sandwich method.

Here is our circuit diagram with out the breakout board or usb cable. I have displayed the soft sandwich sensor with a force sensor for this illustration.

The code that we used was a basic piece from photo resistor project from wt1 and adapted to fit our needs.

/*
BODY Language:
Wearable Technology 2 (GDES 3B44)
Code taken and modified from:
Sensor Project
Wearable Technology 1 (GDES 3B16)
Kate Hartman – Fall 2010
Example: Using a Stretch sensor to sense whether you are resting or stretching you shoulder.
Attach the sensor to the back of a shirt
Attach an LED or a buzzer to pin 8.
*/
int ledPin = 8;        // LED is connected to digital pin 8
int sensorPin = 0; // Stretch sensor is connected to analog pin 0
int sensorValue; // variable to store the value coming from the sensor
void setup()
{
pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT); // sets the ledPin to be an output
Serial.begin(9600);        //initialize the serial port
}
void loop() // run over and over again
{
sensorValue = analogRead(sensorPin); // read the value from the sensor
if(sensorValue>850){ //You can change the number here to adjust the threshold.
Serial.print(“STRETCH!!!”);
digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH); //Turn LED on
}
else{
Serial.println(“rest”);
digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW); //Turn LED off
}
Serial.print(”                     Sensor Value: “);
Serial.println(sensorValue);
delay(100); // delay for 1/10 of a second
}

/*

Code was modified so that when the sensor value was over 850 the LED would go on and the serial readout would read “STRETCH!!!”.

Problems occurred while I was attaching the components together. The wire gage that i chose was much to small and as a result the wire became brittle and cracked at the soldier points making it difficult to complete without failure.

Conductive fabric sandwiched between cotton t-shirt material, and Velostat. wire soldiered to conductive fabric.

Conductive fabric ironed onto jersey, sandwich sensor then sowed into place to complete the sensor. all connected to the Lily Pad (+,-,A0)

Finished product in resting state.

Finished product while sensor is being compressed. The LED was used here to visualize to the class that the sensor has actual output, this is a primitive prototype for athletic equipment. Different signal output would benefit the user exponentially, a wireless watch application comes to mind a slight vibration with a delay could be implemented (golf) wristband with light or beep (tennis/squash).

The Nipple

"Oh! How titilating!"

Teat. Tit. Udder. Nipple.

How do we use technology to (re)shape our perceptions and attitudes towards our bodies? This piece is an exploration in play. We started with an area of the body that is loaded (pun intended) with social stigma. A nipple being given to a baby suggests one relationship between bodies while a nipple in the mouth of another adult or exposed in public has completely different connotations.

Nipples are fun.

Titty-twister. Tweak. Ruby-booby. Purple-nurple.

No matter what your personal relationship to The Nipple is, The Nipple has a history of being tweaked, twisted, and toyed with. From school boys to famous works of art there is homage paid to The Nipple. The well known Le’Ecole de Fontainebleau subverts notions of Fine Art as something unexciting and dry and engorges it with an element of play. All thanks to The Nipple.

We started with 8 purple LEDs sewn in parallel in a circle. The soft ‘sandwich’ switch was placed in the centre of the LEDs making up the actual nipple. A coin cell battery pack was sewn to the underside of the areola. The entire structure was covered with handmade felt and a adhesive nipple cover was sewn to the back.

Switch

Power source

Open circuit

Closed circuit

OUCH!

I am WOMAN!

I am Woman

Hear me BEEP!

 

Whole Body Project Focused on the Vagina

Group: Amanda, Erin, Loretta

Our initial concept came from opening up and discussing the intricacies of our experience as females with a vagina. As a group we were fascinated with the occurrence of menstrual cycle synchronization of groups of women, as well as the concept of externalizing the internal.

The vagina contains a muscle grouping commonly referred to as Kegel Muscles. Good vaginal muscle tone and control are important to exercise to support the bladder (especially after child birth), to reduce the chance of vaginal infections, to increase the pleasure of sexual relations, as well as assist in the proper placement of contraceptive devices. We wanted to give a voice to a part of the female body that is very active, but many people may not be aware of – even in their own bodies. Much of our original exploration came from our personal experiences. A considerable amount of time was spent discussing potential materials, tools, and placement of the device itself. Considerations included moisture, inherent pressure in the vaginal canal, speaker location, bacteria, laundering of fabric, ways of sanitizing/covering the device, and reusability.

The rationale to use a pressure sensor rather than temperature or humidity inputs ties in the idea of strength; we are flexing our muscles as women, both figuratively and metaphorically. When the Kegal Muscles are squeezed the device senses the pressure and outputs a sound, drawing attention to the internal strength in women’s bodies, and allowing for unique communication among women using the device.

We decided to make a couple of different versions of the device. The first is the Simple Kegel Sensor, an analog circuit that requires no fussing over code. The second is the Kegel Organ, of which we demonstrate two manifestions: one that plays notes based on pressure threshold, and another that plays “Mary Had a Little Lamb” through sequential programming of the notes.

Simple Kegel Sensor (Amanda)

The simple Kegel sensor is likened to the use of a tampon. It is made from neoprene, velostat, conductive fabric, conductive thread, wire, 9V battery, and buzzer. The pieces were hand sewn, and easily clip onto a belt or waistband.

 

Sensor with Clip on Batt Pack and Speaker

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kegel Organ (Loretta and Erin)

Loretta: My organ consists of a commercial force sensor, 10k resistor, Lilypad Arduino, piezo speaker, tampon, scotch tape and the finger cut from a latex glove. The Lilypad has been programmed to sense 4 specified vaginal pressures that will cause the buzzer to make a different note for each pressure.

Here’s my code:

/* created by Erin Lewis, January 18, 2011
modified by Loretta Faveri, January 23, 2011
*/

int speakerPin = 10; // speaker/piezo is connected to digital pin 10
int sensorPin = 0; // pressure sensor is connected to analog pin 0
int sensorValue;

void setup() {
pinMode(speakerPin, OUTPUT);
Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop() {
sensorValue = analogRead(sensorPin);
sensorValue = sensorValue * 10;

if(sensorValue == 920) {
beep(speakerPin,2093,250); //C: Last number is the duration of the note in milliseconds (ie. 250) = .25 of a second
}

if(sensorValue > 999) {
beep(speakerPin,2637,500); //E
}

if(sensorValue == 880) {
beep(speakerPin,2793,500); //F
}

if(sensorValue == 910) {
beep(speakerPin,3520,500); //AC
}
else{
digitalWrite(speakerPin, LOW);
}

// scale();

Serial.print(“Sensor Value: “);
Serial.println(sensorValue);
delay(100);
}

void beep (unsigned char speakerPin, int frequencyInHertz, long timeInMilliseconds) {
int x;
long delayAmount = (long)(1000000/frequencyInHertz);
long loopTime = (long)((timeInMilliseconds*1000)/(delayAmount*2));
for (x=0;x<loopTime;x++)
{
digitalWrite(speakerPin,HIGH);
delayMicroseconds(delayAmount);
digitalWrite(speakerPin,LOW);
delayMicroseconds(delayAmount);
}
}

void scale () {
beep(speakerPin,2093,1000); //C:
beep(speakerPin,2349,500); //D
beep(speakerPin,2637,500); //E
beep(speakerPin,2793,500); //F
beep(speakerPin,3136,500); //G
beep(speakerPin,3520,500); //A
beep(speakerPin,3951,500); //B
beep(speakerPin,4186,500); //C */
}

Final Composition

Force sensor - wire connections shrink wrapped and taped to tampon

Erin: My version of the Kegel Organ plays “Mary Had a Little Lamb”. Each vaginal contraction triggers another note in the sequence.

.

Materials used include the Lilypad Arduino, a force sensor, 10k pull-down resistor, 8-ohm speaker, wire, tampon, latex “finger” (from a latex glove), neoprene, thread, and a handsewn fabric pocket for inserting the sensor into the vagina.

Kegel Organ Circuitry - Erin

Kegel Organ Belt with Sensor - Erin

//Written by Erin Lewis 2011

int speakerPin = 10;     // speaker/piezo is connected to digital pin 10
int sensorPin = 0;    // pressure sensor is connected to analog pin 0
int counter = 0;
const int MAXNOTES = 25;

int melody[] = {1,2,3,2,1,1,1,2,2,2,1,4,4,1,2,3,2,1,1,1,2,2,1,2,3};

int durations[] = {2,1,1,1,3,2,2,2,2,2,1,1,1,1,2,3,2,1,1,1,2,2,1,2,1};

void setup() {
pinMode(speakerPin, OUTPUT);
Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop() {
int sensorValue;

sensorValue = analogRead(sensorPin);
sensorValue = sensorValue * 10;

if (sensorValue > 50)
{
playnote(counter);
counter++;
counter %= MAXNOTES;

do {
sensorValue = analogRead(sensorPin);
sensorValue = sensorValue * 10;
} while (sensorValue > 500);
}
}

void playnote(int counter)
{
int note;
int duration;

note = melody[counter];
duration = durations[counter] * 500;

switch (note) {

case 3:
beep(speakerPin,2637,duration);     //E
break;

case 2:
beep(speakerPin,2349,duration);    //D
break;

case 1:
beep(speakerPin,2093,duration);    //C
break;

case 4:
beep(speakerPin,3136,duration);      //G
break;

default:
digitalWrite(speakerPin, LOW);
break;
}
}

void beep (unsigned char speakerPin, int frequencyInHertz, long timeInMilliseconds) {
int x;
long delayAmount = (long)(1000000/frequencyInHertz);
long loopTime = (long)((timeInMilliseconds*1000)/(delayAmount*2));
for (x=0; x<loopTime; x++)
{
digitalWrite(speakerPin,HIGH);
delayMicroseconds(delayAmount);
digitalWrite(speakerPin,LOW);
delayMicroseconds(delayAmount);
}
}

/*
void scale () {
beep(speakerPin,2093,500);    //C
beep(speakerPin,2349,500);     //D
beep(speakerPin,2637,500);     //E
beep(speakerPin,2793,500);     //F
beep(speakerPin,3136,500);     //G
beep(speakerPin,3520,500);     //A
beep(speakerPin,3951,500);     //B
beep(speakerPin,4186,500);     //C
}
*/
}

Soldering

Collaborating

A sample text widget

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