Design opportunities work september -December 2016

September:Assignment 1, design opportunities ideals

  1. Inclusive education public policy
  2. Self-employed graduates
  3. Low cost Assistive technology

Write a paragraph discussing how one or more of your design ideas (from Assignment 1 Part A) might inclusively “afford” certain actions.

The third design idea I submitted is low cost assistive technology. It is about addressing the problem of high production costs and market prices of Assistive technologies which results into Assistive Technology Users´ high dependency on Family support, Government assistance such as social security, disability assistance and funding from charities to buy the products and services.
While Public investment policies and other public policies provide funding to users to buy the assistive technologies. The assistance is not adequate to enable them buy high priced customized assistive technology products and services that allow users to have independent living, work and contribute productively. It only enables them to get low cost basic assistive technologies(AT) that do not enable them have full independent living.
The solution i suggest is that of design of inclusive public investment policies at all levels that reduce the production costs of assistive technology products and services through Tax waive off and public funding for small scale assistive technology manufacturers and others in return for reduction of market prices which are affordable by all users of assistive technology at all levels.
The inclusive design of public investment policy and system puts the user assistive technology and involves all stakeholders including AT small scale manufacturers, Policy makers, distributors and others. The inclusive public investment policy and systems will stimulate innovation and high production levels of different categories of assistive technologies for a small market of users. When the supply of products is higher than the demand then this results into reducing the prices of the quality customized products which are affordable. The user will live independently and will not depend on charity as he can participate in productive work and earn income.

Assignment 2a: WCAG compliant quad submission:

 

Design idea 1: Equitable access to education for all

The figure 1 is a image of unbalanced weighing scale representing inequalities in education sector as a result of non-inclusive education policies, practices and curriculum.

Problem:

Non inclusive public education policies, practices and curriculum.
There are inequalities in access to education and learning in schools. The policies do not establish budgets and obligations and duties for schools to put in place inclusive environments for learners with different disabilities to access learning in schools. Teachers’ training curriculum do not include the inclusive education skills and knowledge building training required to enable all learners access education. The school curriculum do not address the learning needs of learners with disabilities.

Target:

Children and young individuals with disabilities.
Over 90% of children living with disabilities are out of school in developing countries according to UNESCO report 2012.

Design solution:

Inclusive public education policies, practices and curriculum.

Design Idea 2: Self-employed graduates.

The figure is a image of two intersecting circles of which one represents the demand for doctors and second one represents the graduates from the education system. The number of graduates that meets the demand for five doctors is three doctors. This is the intersection of the two circles. The remain 2 doctors are demanded and this represents a gap of two doctors in first circle. The second circle has two unemployed teachers as there is no demand for teachers. The image shows that the education sector does not meet the demands of the economy or industries.

Problem:

High rate of unemployed graduates.
There is high number of unemployed graduates on streets. They do not have vocational skills nor experience required by some employers to get the job. They cannot start their own businesses to be self-employed.

Target:

The young graduates. A significant number of young graduates is unemployed and many are on streets looking for jobs.

Design solution:

Vocational training and industrial apprenticeship.
The vocational training programme will empower graduates with hands on skills such as decoration, tailoring, how to make bread, cakes, wine, soap and others. These enable graduates to start up their own small scale business thus becoming self-employed. Industrial apprenticeship will provide practical capacity building .and graduates will acquire experiences.

Design idea 3: Low cost Assistive technology(AT) products

The figure 2 is a picture of two circles of which one represents producers’ high cost of manufacturing assistive technology products and the second circle represents consumer high prices of assistive technology products. There is an arrow between the two circles with point in the direction of consumer high price circle. This means that the producers pass on high costs to the consumers in form of high prices. Below the two circles is a long rectangle representing public investment policies and system. There are arrows between the two circles and the rectangle. The arrow between the procucers’ AT high cost circle and rectangle pointing in direction of rectangle represents the taxes paid by producers in government treasury which supports public investments. The arrow between consumer high price circle and rectangle pointing in direction of circle represents public investments in form of social security support, disability assistance support and others aimed at lowering cost of living for user of assistive technology to have decent living. There are more two arrows pointing at consumer high price circle. These represent the family support and non -public assistance that users to have access to products and services including AT products at affordable price

Design problem:

Unaffordable prices of Assistive technology products for users.
The high cost of manufacturing assistive technology products results into high market prices of assistive technology products because manufacturers pass on the high cost to consumers in form of high prices of the products. The government through the public investment schemes such as the disability assistance programme, health insurance and social security programme and together with Family and private foundations’ assistance supports the AT users to access assistive technologies. However most of the time these initiatives only enable users to access basic assistive technology products that are not fully customized to their needs. They cannot live independently and continue to rely on goodwill and charity from government, family, private foundation and others.

Tagret:

Older individuals and individuals with disabilities.
The majority users of assistive technology products are older individuals and individuals with disabilities who have difficulties in body functioning and environment has barriers that limits their full and effective participation.

Design solution:

Inclusive public Investment policy and framework.
The development of an inclusive investment policy and framework will position the users’ prices of assistive technology products and producers costs of production at the center of public investments. Policy will establish public fund to establish AT public design laboratories for use by AT emerging designers and small scale manufacturers. Funds will also support assistive technology product development and it’s delivery to the market at affordable prices. Public will own shares in the sales of the product until it’s public investments are recovered. Policy will also offer tax holidays for small and medium AT manufacturers struggling with high cost of production and return will be affordable market prices for assistive technology products.

October.

Tackle the complex notion of categorization discussion.

One of my design ideas is inclusive education public policy that responds to the needs of diverse learners with varying abilities. Understanding the diverse needs of learners requires categorization of diverse groups of learners to understand better their diversity and their varying needs and abilities. The inclusive education policy also categories different stakeholders such as Government, teachers, parents, school administration according to their mandate and responsibilities towards responding to needs of diverse or all categories of learners in the learning environment.

Use your models or visualizations that show the spectrum of design ideas to propose possible clusters (or categories) of ideas that could serves as the basis for teams.

The 38 design ideals are categorized in a spectrum of four main needs which include; legal and policy, physical, economic, social, information, communication and Technology(ICT). Some design responses or solutions cut across more than one category as demonstrated below. Each of the design ideals is assigned number to identify it from each other. Each design ideal is under the four categories above however some ideals appear in more than one category and this implies the relationships between the sector in addressing the needs of individuals and community. The allocation of numbers for each of design ideal for Identification is as follow;

1. Inclusive way finding (1)
2. Web tool (2)
3. Hot Dog holder (3)
4. Dermatology for everyone (4)
5. Smart sheet Music (5)
6. Restaurant booking system (6)
7. Clearing Cabbage near bus and train station/game (7).
8. A coffee cup (8)
9. Augmented reality experience to support long distance runners (9)
10. ADHD in focus (10)
11. Life guard band (11)
12. Women safety app (12)
13. Responsive Canvass redesign (13)
14. Voice marginalia (14)
15. Safe walk design (15)
16. VR stimulator (16)
17. Tool for collaborative knowledge construction in College (17)
18. Inclusive education centers (18)
19. The trip Helper (19)
20. Communication Aids and support workers in Prison (20)
21. 911 Panic button (21)
22. ADOD reporting (22)
23. Inclusive education policy and system (23).
24. Low cost assistive technology (24)
25. Employment policies (25)
26. Toilet tissue alarm system (26)
27. Portable light (27)
28. Sensor operated can cabbage (28)
29. Parking app (29)
30. Integrated emergency responsive (30)
31. Juice Jar (31)
32. Tilt Book shelf (32)
33. How to provide tactile live sport experience (33)
34. Communication tool (34)
35. Awareness arising for Muslim facing discrimination at work (35)
36. Highway street lights poles (36)
37. Maintenances service design solutions (37)
38. Asus key design solution. (38)

The above design ideals are categorized as follow;

Legal and policy needs design response

Inclusive education policy and systematic reporting, Inclusive education policy and system.

Physical needs,
Tilt Book shelf, Safe walk, Highway street lights poles, Parking app,
Maintenances service design solutions.

Economic needs design response

Low cost assistive technology through public investment policy.

Social needs design response

Muslim in work place facing discrimination, Inclusive education centers, A coffee cup
Hot Dog, The trip Helper, Communication Aids and support workers in Prison, Communication tool for students and lectures. Juice Jar

Technology needs design response

Inclusive way finding, Web tool, Dermatology for everyone, Smart sheet Music
Convenient eat place, Clearing Cabbage near bus and train station, Tool for collaborative knowledge construction in College, Augmented reality experience to support long distance runners, ADHD in focus, Life guard band, Women safety app, Responsive Canvass, Voice mrginala
VR stimulator, Tool for collaborative knowledge construction in College, 911 Panic button
Self-employed graduates, Toilet tissue alarm system, Portable light, Sensor operated can cabbage, Integrated emergency responsive, How to provide tactile live sport experience, Asus key design solution.

November.

Discuss one or more of your design ideas through the lens of memory as a resource for affording understandability.

The Inclusive Public Education policy design idea can be understood through the lens of the memory. The memory resources enables the remembering of the what, how, when, why, questions and answers of Inclusive public education policy. Without the memory resource, we cannot remember the design idea.

December

Discuss a design idea presented in class relative to the WCAG robustness principle.

Robust principal with in the public policy and Built environment would imply that public policy is understand, used and accessible by wide range of users from members of communities, business, law enforcers. The built environment accommodates diverse users with less difficulties. Robust principal and Inclusive Design share the same goal of inclusion of different elements based on the context. The design of the service or product or solution should be able to benefit a wide range of diverse users and compatible with different contexts and dynamics such as culture and changing environments.

Public policy compliance, Case study of public policy on Accessibility. Accessibility of Ontarian with disability(AODA,2005) Vs American Disability Act (ADA1990).

Introduction: Background

  Challenges related to compliance of the public policies and laws

  1. Complex to understand the policy (Maya report,2014)
  2. Limited resources to enable compliance (maya report,2014)
  3. Limited awareness about existing standards, Policies.
  4. Limited standards (Paul Bear report,2010)
  5. Institutional framework.

Description of the Problem

  1. Limited compliance results into exclusion and limited access to built environment, services and goods.

Purpose of the Project

  • Develop a model that addresses challenges related to compliance with Accessibility policy.

Objectives and questionnaires

  1. Which action can contribute to compliance with Accessibility Public Policy?
  2. What are some of the existing intervention that support compliance with accessibility public policy?
  3. What are some of the good practices in compliance with Accessibility public policy?

Methodology:

  1. Questionnaires, Observation
  2. Interviews
  3. Secondary data analysis.

Scope and Limitation:

  • Response will not address the challenge related to lack of resources to support compliance with accessibility?

Literature Review:The case study of AODA and ADA:

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005.

AODA 2005 has five accessibility standards which are: customer services, employment, design of public space spaces, information and communications and transport standards. These five standards are accompanied by general requirements which are: provide training to staff and volunteers; develop an accessibility policy; create a multi-year accessibility plan and update it every five years; consider accessibility in procurement and when designing or purchasing self-service kiosks. The combination of the five standards and the general requirements forms the Integrated Accessibility standards of the AODA as show in the Diagram below.

Diagram of Integrated Accessibility standards.

Description:

The Diagram has a rectangle on top which represents Integrated Accessibility standard regulations(IASR). Below the rectangle is the set of three rectangles on the left side and three rectangles on the right side. The first rectangle on the left side is General requirements and the first one on the right side is Customer service standard. The two are connected to the top rectangle. Below the general requirements rectangle on the left side is information and communications rectangle and below it is the transport standard rectangle. These are connected to each other and then connect to the main rectangle. The right side below the customer service standard there is employment standard and design of public space standard. Also these connect to each other and then connect the main integrated accessibility standard regulations.

Below the general requirements rectangle on the left side is information and communications rectangle and below it is the transport standard rectangle. These are connected to each other and then connect to the main rectangle. The right side below the customer service standard there is employment standard and design of public space standard. Also these connect to each other and then connect the main integrated accessibility standard regulations.

The Standards and the General Guidelines.

The IASR includes, The AODA standards are part of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation (IASRhttps://www.ontario.ca/laws/regulation/110191) in addition to requirements specific to each standard, the following general requirements:

  1. provide training to staff and volunteers
  2. develop an accessibility policy
  3. create a multi-year accessibility plan and update it every five years
  4. consider accessibility in procurement and when designing or
  5. purchasing self-service kiosks.

Institutional framework of AODA.

  1. Ontario Accessibility Directorate (https://www.ontario.ca/page/accessibility)
  2. Compliance reports by both Business and Public Institutions required. .
  3. Compliance penalty ranges from 100,00 dollars to 50,000 dollars.

ADA 1990 as amended in 2008.

  • The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public.
  • Amended in 2008 and title I, II, III and V integrated into Title 42.
  • Monitored by number of institutions.

ADA sections

  • Title I: Employment (US Equal opportunity commission)
  • Title II – Public Services: State and Local Government (Dept of Justice)
  • Title III – Public Accommodations and Services Operated by Private Entities (US Department of Justice).
  • Title IV – Telecommunications (Federal communication commission).
  • Title V – Miscellaneous Provisions (relation with other laws, State immunity, conditions not considered as disability. https://adata.org/factsheet/ADA-overview

Compliance comparison:

           AODA 2005                                                                ADA 1990.

State or regional                                                    Federal Law

Accessibility Directorate                                     Depart of Justice & Multiple institutions follow up.

Legal Framework                                                  multiple laws/Public litigation.

Disability Movement not strong                        Civil rights movement aware of rights strong.

Few standards                                  Many standards covering number of sectors Health, education

Accessibility Policy compliance and Built environment.

Problem: Limited compliance to Public policy and laws on Accessibility(AODA) by Businesses.

The image is a diagram of the wheelchair users representing public policy on accessibility trying to climb up the steps that leads to the top up where services and goods by business and public institutions are provided.

Impact of the problem

  1. Inaccessible services and goods excluding users with disabilities.
  2. Noncompliance with the public policy
  3. Users with disabilities are excluded in enjoying the social (education, health), Economic(employment) and Political (Participation in elections and accessing elections) opportunities.

Solution:

  1. Provision of accessible services and goods by business and public agencies.
  2. Awareness arising and provision of information on accessibility standards and policy to users, policy enforcers, Businesses and staff of public agencies and others.

Stakeholders:

  1. Users with disabilities
  2. Community members
  3. Businesses
  4. Public institutions and enforcers of the policy.

 

Porotype solution: Information interactive Interface

Facilitates interaction and provides information among the users with disabilities, Businesses and public institutions providing goods and services, technical experts on accessibility and policy makers /public institution in charge of accessibility.
The Diagram has an Horizontal rectangle diagram representing the central information server system that facilitates interaction and exchange of information among different agents. There are five squares connected to the horizontal rectangle. The two squares connected on the top of rectangle represent the users or the community members and the technical experts on accessibility respectively. The two squares connected below the rectangle or down represent the public agency in charge of accessibility and businesses respectively. The 5th square on top of the rectangle or on the west side represents the public institutions providing services and goods.

Interpretation of the Diagram:

The two arrow lines from the users’ square on top represents the provision of information and feedback on accessible services and goods provided by public institutions and businesses. The two arrows from the technical expert square on top represents technical knowledge and expertise and feedback provided to businesses and public institutions having challenges of inaccessible goods and services

The public agency in charge of accessibility square below rectangle represents awareness arising and feedback on public policy and laws on accessibility to the different stakeholders as represented by the center middle line connecting two end points connecting users, public institution and public agency on accessibility connected point on one side and Technical experts on accessibility and businesses connected point on other side.

The business square below the rectangle represents information on accessible and inaccessible services and goods provided and received by businesses.

The Rectangle provides connection and interactions among businesses, Government institutions, users and technical experts on accessibility to addresses the challenge of inaccessible built environment, goods and services.

Conclusion:

The awareness arising and provision of information about the AODA and accessibility standards empowers the users to hold accountable those who do not provide accessibility and demand their right to accessibility. Users will report cases of inaccessible environments through the interface.

The Business and public institutions providing services and goods will have access to technical knowledge and assistance to improve accessibility of their services and goods. The interface links them to different technical experts on Accessibility. They will also be aware of the standards, policies and laws on accessibility.

The Pubic institution in charge of Accessibility or the Directorate of disability and accessibility will be able to identify businesses and public institutions that do not comply with the policy and law. It will take appropriate intervention to increase compliance levels.

The Technical experts on Accessibility use the interface to provide technical assistance to increase compliance with the Public policy on accessibility and Built environment. This builds a link with the built environment as all aim at inclusion and accessibility.

Reference/List:

Charles beer, 2010, Report of the independent review of the accessibility for Ontarians with disabilities act, 2005
http://www.aoda.ca/report-of-the-independent-review-of-the-accessibility-for-ontarians-with-disabilities-act-2005/

US Access board reports,2015 https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/buildings-and-sites/about-the-aba-standards

Mayo Moran,2015, The independent review report on the implementation and enforcement of the accessibility for ontarians with disabilities act,2005,www.aoda.ca/the-aoda-alliances-detailed-analysis-of-the-final-report-of-the-mayo-mo

 

Lab1 Journal Sep – Dec

September 19

Assignment 1A: Design ideas

Idea1 – Convenient Eating

Problem

  • waste of time(People waiting in line at restaurant)
    in small spaces, can be challenges to find somewhere to wait(people with disabilities, people with babies)
  • too heavy to hold babies(people with babies)
  • health concerns, can’t stand for very long time(elderly people)
  • maybe uncomfortable if line too long while eating, some people feel they should eat quickly
  • people who drive occupy parking spaces too long

Community

  • All kind of people who want to eat outside

Solutions

  • creating a booking system
  • people did not book before they can check if restaurant still has seats
  • gather similar restaurant information which can substitute

Idea2 – Garbage Near Bus Stop

Problem

  • The garbage near bus stop has negative effect to the appearance of a city

Community

  • Citizens

Solutions

  • Designing a game system to appeal people pick up the garbage near bus stop and providing
    some tools. This game can record how many garbage people pick up and show a rank on its system.

September 26

Assignment 1B

Model for Categorizing Our Ideas

  • We brainstormed how to make model to categorize our ideas and make our own model.
  • M mentioned a good idea to use x-axis and y-axis to classify our category.
  • Read Accessing e-Learning Systems via Screen Reader: An Example and join group discuss it

October 3

Assignment 1C

  • Analyze our ideas and category 5 themes
  • 1. Digital (app, system, etc.)
    2.Portable (disposable, flexible)
    3.Fixed (infrastructure)
    4.Spacial
    5.Environment friendly

October 22

Join VR group(way-finding)

  • Thought use GPS to help people with vision impairment navigate city

introdoction

  • Background for problem

Blind people difficult to navigate in a new place they have never been.

  • Description of problem

Learning the configuration of a new space is a very important task, most of all when someone cannot rely on sight. Observing how blind individuals moves inside a known environment (for example their house) it is possible to notice how they can navigate in different spaces without hitting walls and obstacles, how their movements are carefully calibrated, as if they were indeed able to see the surrounding environment. This is a clear indicator of the importance of creating a mental representation of a given environment, and of the accuracy this representation in the minds of blind and visually impaired individuals.
Virtual Reality Interactive Environments for the Blind

  • Purpose of project

Virtual Reality Interactive Environments for the Blind

  • Objective or questions

1.Blind people prefer tactile perception or auditory perception.
2. What kind of way to represent the space can be easily understand by blind individuals? Right to left, central to sides or up to down?
3. Which way is more easy to navigate this product? Input words, voice control or other ways?
4. If blind individuals will be annoyed with the sounds. For example, when people use gps, some of them prefer mute the sounds of it. As they feel the sounds is annoying.
5. Maybe sometimes blind individuals tend to use tactile perception to explore a new space, which is full of freshness, instead of being told.

  • Brief environmental scan/literature

Virtual reality way-finding for blind individuals
Virtual Reality Interactive Environments for the Blind Electronic Travel Aids for the Blind and Vision Impaired
Assisting Wayfinding in Visually Impaired Travelers
Sonic technology can be incorporated into devices that blind or visually-impaired people either hold in their hands or wear on their heads. Microcomputers coordinate a pulse-echo system for these devices. Transmittal send out sonic energy along the desired path, and this energy bounces off objects on the path. The resulting echoes are detected by receivers and processed by a microcomputer on the device to deliver auditory information to the user through headphones.
Wayfinding Technology for Visually-Impaired People
Blind Navigation and the Role of Technology

Oct 26

Research on sonic-wayfinding and VR

Sonic technology can be incorporated into devices that blind or visually-impaired people either hold in their hands or wear on their heads. Microcomputers coordinate a pulse-echo system for these devices. Transmitters send out sonic energy along the desired path, and this energy bounces off objects on the path. The resulting echoes are detected by receivers and processed by a microcomputer on the device to deliver auditory information to the user through headphones.

  • Example

Sonic Tunnel
Validating Wayfindr

  • VR helps people with disabilities in four directions

1. Treatment of Alzheimer
2. To help people with disabilities to recover the ability to exercise
3. To help disabled children learn to live independently
4. Involved in the treatment of autistic children

  • VR to help people with disabilities to achieve the dream of the three cases

1. VR helps disabled teenagers play the piano with their eyes
2. To help deaf patients realize diving dream
3. Help disabled children experience the fun of visiting the park

  • After these research I want to change the direction of my project to help the disabled compose use eye tracking technology and VR technology. But after did some research I find that don’t need to combine eye tracking technology and VR technology. Eye tracking technology had applied with computer, which people use an eye-tracking bar to control computer. No need to use VR in this part.
  • Because I still interested in music field. I think maybe I can combine VR therapy and music therapy to help people who suffer from stroke training. The simulated concert scene allows the patient to train their upper limbs through the VR as a conductor.
  • There are some reasons why I think this project can help and I will do some literature review then.

1. Stroke Patients and therapist lack the opportunity to create/recreate rehabilitation activities within their environment
2. Many victim upper limb has move impairment after stroke and most of them just one-side Paralyzed
3. Strain one arm maybe the other one can benefit from it
4. Music therapy help treatment more effective
5. VR and music make training more interesting
6. After victim play this game they will feel a sense of accomplishment

  • There are some problems about this project:

1. What kind of training do victims usually have?
2. What are some effective VR therapy treatment?
3. How many hours do they need to take on training (or more specific on their arm), how long time they have significant progress?
4. What kind of upper limb treatment do they have? Like what kind of muscular movement do they have and efficient to their rehabilitation?
5. Music conducting requires the movement of which part of muscles? If these muscle are exactly the muscle stroke victim need to train?
6. If there are some evidence show VR benefit to therapy
7. How to design game can motivate victims most?

Nov 7

Meeting with group via Skype

  • need more peer-reviewed literature
  • Felipe: audio and technology e.g., echo location, sonar
  • Teresa: impact of VR/simulation on brain
  • Fetimeh: health side effects, including but not limited to VR headsets
  • Rylan: how people process sound
  • Annie: research on both groups and how VR affects us, including social aspects
  • Cindy: VR hardware options
  • Jen: absent from the meeting

Hardware options

  • They consist of 3 basic parts, positional tracking, lenses and screen. The positional tracking sensors are listed below.
  • On the lower end headsets, the housing provides lenses and resting area for the phone, the positional tracking is provided by the phone internal hardware.
  • On the middle tier, the headset provide, lenses, resting area for the phone and additional sensors in addition to the phone’s internal hardware.
  • On high end headsets, screen, senor, and lenses are provided in one convenient housing, usually driven by a high power computer.
  • Senor
  • Accelerometer:
    Measure x, y, z axis , by measuring the acceleration , it can computer the positional change.
  • Magnetic field sensor:
    Re align, the senor periodically.
  • Gyroscope:
    Measures the rotations of the headset.
  • Lenses
  • Split the image for parallax effect and focus the image to give the illusion of distance.

    Nov 14

    Stroke and stroke rehabilitation

    Stroke victims suffer from a number of problems
    • problems with movement and balance: many people experience muscle weakness or paralysis after a stroke, which can affect your mobility and balance. This usually happens on one side of your body and can also cause a lot of pain and discomfort.
    • problems with your vision (right brain)
    • problems with swallowing (left brain/right brain)
    • problems controlling your bladder and bowels
    • excessive tiredness (left brain/right brain)
    • problems with communication (left brain)
    • problems with memory and thinking (left brain/right brain)
    • changes to your emotions (left brain/right brain)
    • changes to your behavior (left brain/right brain)
    • When stroke occurs in the brain stem, depending on the severity of the injury, it can affect both sides of the body and may leave someone in a ‘locked-in’ state. When a locked-in state occurs, the patient is generally unable to speak or achieve any movement below the neck.
    Reference
    stroke association
    American stroke association
    Music rehabilitation

  • “Rhythmic synchronization of movement to external stimuli facilitates sensorimotor coupling for movement recovery, enhances emotional engagement, and has positive effects on interpersonal relationships.”
  • Music Upper Limb Therapy-Integrated: An Enriched Collaborative Approach for Stroke Rehabilitation
    VR rehabilitation
  • “Statistic shows that there are about 15 million people affected by a stroke worldwide each year. About 5 million of those affected result in death and 5 million are left with a permanent disability. For those whom survive, it is very difficult to return to a normal activity, such as controlling their movements and becoming independent again. Researchers are using virtual reality and computer technology to improve stroke rehabilitation. This new revolutionary software can help identify different types of brain injuries, and help facilitate the most effective ways to treat the patient.Virtual reality (VR) has emerged as one of the most effective treatment approaches in stroke therapy rehabilitation. This method is beneficial because they provide the patient and physical therapist with the opportunity to practice activities that are not or cannot be achieved within the clinical environment. Additionally, virtual reality is often designed to be more engaging, more interesting and more enjoyable than traditional stroke rehabilitation, thereby encouraging patients to continue on a physical therapy regime versus patients who plateau and discontinue with stroke physical therapy.”
  • Virtual Reality in Stroke Rehabilitation

    Nov 22

    Literature review to collect data

    Some experiments
    Robot-Assisted Movement Training Compared With Conventional Therapy Techniques for the Rehabilitation of Upper-Limb Motor Function After Stroke
    Enhanced physical therapy improves recovery of arm function after stroke. A randomised controlled trial.
    Making music and muscles
    Music Therapy for The Rehabilitation of Upper Limb With Stroke Patients (TIMPStro)

    Dec 5

    Interview a stroke victim and an expert

    1. What kind of treatment do they usually have?
    2. What kind of treatment do you think most efficient to stroke victim?
    3. How many hours do they need to take on training, how long time they have significant progress?
    4. If they enjoy therapy training? The feeling of them when they do traditional therapy training.
    5. If music (musical therapy) good to their treatment or make them feel better or when they do therapy training they will not as bored as before?
    6. What kind of upper limb treatment do they have ?
    7. If they need musical therapy? If so how many of them try musical therapy , are they enjoy it?
    8. How many of them tried VR therapy? How do they think of VR therapy? Do they think VR therapy can help their treatment more effectively?
    9. How many of them want to try other ways(like VR) instead of traditional therapy?

    Dec 12

    Meet with Peter

    Organize design method
    Use story broad to present

Week 13 Meagan Castle

Cait and I created our final presentation for assignment 4 based on our research, investigation, concepts and ideas which has been submitted.

For the conclusion of our project we reflected upon our progress and next steps;

  • While I believe that the first 3 weeks of class and initial induction phase was valuable, I wish that we would have honed in on our idea and concept early as to have facilitated more progress in particular, I wanted to get to a full scale prototype
  • We also reflected upon how it might have been difficulty to find dedicated participants (those who use walkers) to test our product and provide feedback
  • We do feel that we have developed a good base and idea to pursue further and have come up with our next steps. These steps include:
  • 3D modelling in Autocad which would facilitate easily manipulatable draftings so we could continue to refine, we want to then use modelling foam to carve a full scale model for user testing and aesthetic refinements,
  • after which we would then use wood to build a more durable and refined product which would lend itself to more physical user testing,
  • upon completion of these phase and a material exploration we would then like to build a full scale prototype.
  • I feel confident in our future steps and look forward to continuing this project

Week 12 Meagan Castle

Cait and I began the ideation process with the development of a mood board as well as developing conceptual scenarios to outline our preliminary sketches. We decided not to discriminate on design ideas and instead just drew a multiple of variations and concepts.

Each idea was to fulfilled our previously outlined design criteria and to draw as many variations as we could think of.

Personal criteria for the user

  • user must be at eye lever
  • should be able to manipulate the device
  • should fit the users needs and be ergonomic
  • should be able to be personalized
  • should not feel medical

Design Criteria

  • lightweight
  • compact and foldable
  • have multi-use (storage, seating)
  • aesthetically interesting
  • stable
  • traction
  • all season

These sketch ideations can be seen in our presentation.

We then moved into low fidelity paper modelling. After which we began to make small scale models, which we made with wood and wire and a hot glue gun.

We have included pictures of these models in our final presentation.

Using these models and ideations we began to extrapolate upon the feasibility and usability of each.

 

PUBLIC POLICY ON ACCESSIBILITY COMPLIANCE AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Public policy compliance, Case study of public policy on Accessibility. Accessibility of Ontarian with disability(AODA,2005) Vs American Disability Act (ADA1990).

Background:

Challenges related to compliance of the public policies and laws

  1. a) Complex to understand the policy (Maya report,2014)
  2. b) Limited resources to enable compliance (maya report,2014)
  3. c) Limited awareness about existing standards, Policies.
  4. d) Limited standards (Paul Bear report,2010)
  5. e) Institutional framework.

Description of the Problem

  1. a) Limited compliance results into exclusion and limited access to built environment, services and goods.

Purpose of the Project

  • Develop a model that addresses challenges related to compliance with Accessibility policy.

Objectives and questionnaires

  1. a) Which action can contribute to compliance with Accessibility Public Policy?
  2. b) What are some of the existing intervention that support compliance with accessibility public policy?
  3. c) What are some of the good practices in compliance with Accessibility public policy?

Methodology:

  1. a) Questionnaires, Observation
  2. b) Interviews
  3. c) Secondary data analysis.

Scope and Limitation:

  • Response will not address the challenge related to lack of resources to support compliance with accessibility?

The case study of AODA and ADA:

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005.

AODA 2005 has five accessibility standards which are: customer services, employment, design of public space spaces, information and communications and transport standards. These five standards are accompanied by general requirements which are: provide training to staff and volunteers; develop an accessibility policy; create a multi-year accessibility plan and update it every five years; consider accessibility in procurement and when designing or purchasing self-service kiosks. The combination of the five standards and the general requirements forms the Integrated Accessibility standards of the AODA as show in the Diagram below.

Diagram of Integrated Accessibility standards.

<The Diagram has a rectangle on top which represents Integrated Accessibility standard regulations(IASR). Below the rectangle is the set of three rectangles on the left side and three rectangles on the right side. The first rectangle on the left side is General requirements and the first one on the right side is Customer service standard. The two are connected to the top rectangle.>Description:
The Diagram has a rectangle on top which represents Integrated Accessibility standard regulations(IASR). Below the rectangle is the set of three rectangles on the left side and three rectangles on the right side. The first rectangle on the left side is General requirements and the first one on the right side is Customer service standard. The two are connected to the top rectangle.
Below the general requirements rectangle on the left side is information and communications rectangle and below it is the transport standard rectangle. These are connected to each other and then connect to the main rectangle. The right side below the customer service standard there is employment standard and design of public space standard. Also these connect to each other and then connect the main integrated accessibility standard regulations.
The Standards and the General Guidelines.
The IASR includes, The AODA standards are part of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation (IASRhttps://www.ontario.ca/laws/regulation/110191) in addition to requirements specific to each standard, the following general requirements:

  1. a) provide training to staff and volunteers
  2. b) develop an accessibility policy
  3. c) create a multi-year accessibility plan and update it every five years
  4. d) consider accessibility in procurement and when designing or
  5. e) purchasing self-service kiosks.
  6. Institutional framework of AODA.
  7. a) Ontario Accessibility Directorate (https://www.ontario.ca/page/accessibility)
  8. b) Compliance reports by both Business and Public Institutions required. .
  9. c) Compliance penalty ranges from 100,00 dollars to 50,000 dollars.

ADA 1990 as amended in 2008.

  • The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public.
  • Amended in 2008 and title I, II, III and V integrated into Title 42.
  • Monitored by number of institutions.

ADA sections

  • Title I: Employment (US Equal opportunity commission)
  • Title II – Public Services: State and Local Government (Dept of Justice)
  • Title III – Public Accommodations and Services Operated by Private Entities (US Department of Justice).
  • Title IV – Telecommunications (Federal communication commission).
  • Title V – Miscellaneous Provisions (relation with other laws, State immunity, conditions not considered as disability. https://adata.org/factsheet/ADA-overview

Compliance comparison:

           AODA 2005                                                                ADA 1990.

State or regional                                                    Federal Law

Accessibility Directorate                                     Depart of Justice & Multiple institutions follow up.

Legal Framework                                                  multiple laws/Public litigation.

Disability Movement not strong                        Civil rights movement aware of rights strong.

Few standards                                  Many standards covering number of sectors Health, education

Accessibility Policy compliance and Built environment.

Problem: Limited compliance to Public policy and laws on Accessibility(AODA) by Businesses.

The image is a diagram of the wheelchair users representing public policy on accessibility trying to climb up the steps that leads to the top up where services and goods by business and public institutions are provided.
 Description of the Image above:
The image is a diagram of the wheelchair users representing public policy on accessibility trying to climb up the steps that leads to the top up where services and goods by business and public institutions are provided.

Impact of the problem

  1. Inaccessible services and goods excluding users with disabilities.
  2. Noncompliance with the public policy
  3. Users with disabilities are excluded in enjoying the social (education, health), Economic(employment) and Political (Participation in elections and accessing elections) opportunities.

Solution:

  1. Provision of accessible services and goods by business and public agencies.
  2. Awareness arising and provision of information on accessibility standards and policy to users, policy enforcers, Businesses and staff of public agencies and others.

Stakeholders:

  1. Users with disabilities
  2. Community members
  3. Businesses
  4. Public institutions and enforcers of the policy.

 

Porotype solution: Information interactive Interface

Facilitates interaction and provides information among the users with disabilities, Businesses and public institutions providing goods and services, technical experts on accessibility and policy makers /public institution in charge of accessibility.

The Diagram of the Interactive information interface model.

 
The Diagram has an Horizontal rectangle diagram representing the central information server system that facilitates interaction and exchange of information among different agents. There are five squares connected to the horizontal rectangle. The two squares connected on the top of rectangle represent the users or the community members and the technical experts on accessibility respectively. The two squares connected below the rectangle or down represent the public agency in charge of accessibility and businesses respectively. The 5th square on top of the rectangle or on the west side represents the public institutions providing services and goods.

Description of the diagram:

The Diagram has an Horizontal rectangle diagram representing the central information server system that facilitates interaction and exchange of information among different agents. There are five squares connected to the horizontal rectangle. The two squares connected on the top of rectangle represent the users or the community members and the technical experts on accessibility respectively. The two squares connected below the rectangle or down represent the public agency in charge of accessibility and businesses respectively. The 5th square on top of the rectangle or on the west side represents the public institutions providing services and goods.

Interpretation of the Diagram:

The two arrow lines from the users’ square on top represents the provision of information and feedback on accessible services and goods provided by public institutions and businesses. The two arrows from the technical expert square on top represents technical knowledge and expertise and feedback provided to businesses and public institutions having challenges of inaccessible goods and services
The public agency in charge of accessibility square below rectangle represents awareness arising and feedback on public policy and laws on accessibility to the different stakeholders as represented by the center middle line connecting two end points connecting users, public institution and public agency on accessibility connected point on one side and Technical experts on accessibility and businesses connected point on other side.
The business square below the rectangle represents information on accessible and inaccessible services and goods provided and received by businesses.
The Rectangle provides connection and interactions among businesses, Government institutions, users and technical experts on accessibility to addresses the challenge of inaccessible built environment, goods and services.

Reference:

Charles beer, 2010, Report of the independent review of the accessibility for Ontarians with disabilities act, 2005  http://www.aoda.ca/report-of-the-independent-review-of-the-accessibility-for-ontarians-with-disabilities-act-2005/
US Access board reports,2015 https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/buildings-and-sites/about-the-aba-standards
Mayo Moran,2015, The independent review report on the implementation and enforcement of the accessibility for ontarians with disabilities act,2005,www.aoda.ca/the-aoda-alliances-detailed-analysis-of-the-final-report-of-the-mayo-mo

https://www.ada.gov/smbusgd.pdf

Week 8 Meagan Castle

As part of our preliminary research I sought an expert within the field of gerontology, who I wanted to interview regarding future projections for aging populations.

Interview with Anju Joshi

Anju Joshi, who is teaching the Fall 2016 McMaster Discovery Program course “Diversity and Resiliency: Human Differences and our Ability to Overcome Challenges,” is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health, Aging, and Society. She has over 30 years of experience working in the field of gerontology, and has facilitated many workshops on diversity and inclusion; system integration and case management; and enhancing intercultural practice. An example of her interest in the dissemination of knowledge is the DVD that she produced: “Promoting the Concept of Personhood in Practice.”

 

Prof. Anju Joshi

Questions

What are some observations you have noticed within the field of Gerontology regarding the increase and future projections within the elderly population?

  • more and more elderly people are choosing autonomous living or seek the help of family as caregivers
  • how can we ensure that people who out live their partners and live autonomous can be safe and secure in their home
  • there is going to be really issues around supporting adult children care givers

What are some of the main issues that elderly and aging populations are currently facing?

  • there will be a huge bottle neck between availability of elderly housing and nursing homes
  • there will be an increase need for personal support workers

What are the projected trends associated to the new aging population?

  • elderly populations are the biggest and fastest growing population of tech users, they want to not feel left behind but don’t actually know how to use the technology they are buying
  • this is also so an issue for people who embrace tech, learn it but then it changes

Where do you feel there are gaps between design and tools for independent living and what is currently on the market?

  • there is a gap between usability and mobility aids, often i have clients who use a walker but can’t use the walker in the home or transport it
  • also there needs to be a better monitoring system for those who live independently

Can you speak to accessibility and what is currently available to people with mobility issues?

  • the assistive devices that are available on the market have not been redesigned in years and i think there is much room for improvement. Devices should be more personalized, lightweight, easy to use, all to often I see clients with assistive devices that just give up on using them for this reason

 

Week 7 Meagan Castle

Over reading week we decided to break from this design idea and instead opened up the discussion to targeting elderly populations. We decided that with an ever-growing population and based on future projections this would be a beneficially area of investigation as we can hopefully look to develop this project further and potentially develop an MRP

According to Statistics Canada

Seniors are projected to become more numerous than children in Canada by 2017—a milestone in the country’s history.

The proportion of seniors within the population has been steadily growing since 1960, increasing from 8% at that time to 14% in 2009. According to all population projection scenarios, seniors are expected to comprise around 23% to 25% of the population by 2036, and around 24% to 28% in 2061

 

c-g02-eng

We also examined the types of disabilities that are prevalent amongst elderly populations and the age distribution of these

c-g04-eng

This is a depiction of the projected age distribution of Canadians from 1975-2035

chart1_5

Based on these findings we decided to do further research and look to identify an area that we could target. As well are next step was to interview experts within the field and senior citizens

 

References

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-654-x/89-654-x2013002-eng.htm

Week 11 Meagan Castle

Cait and I divided up the assistive devices we chose to research and I looked at medical alarms and canes. I found extensive information on canes and their evolution but limited information on medical alarms

The History of Canes

– In ancient Egypt, a staph was of prime importance acting as visible symbol of ones class and occupation. A pharaoh’s staph was elaborately decorated displaying their wealth and importance and was placed beside the mummified Pharaoh to protect them in their travels to the afterlife.

– In the Middle Ages, the Church and clergy members were to be the only users of walking sticks, sceptre and staphs. These elaborate staphs were guiled and adorned with crosses and bishop’s crosiers. Some even contained hiding places for money, precious stones and secret weapons.

-European kings such as Henry VII, Charles I and Louis XIV have been depicted with their canes as a symbol of authority and reserved the right to be the only ‘wearer’ of a cane within the court

– In Europe canes gained popularity in the early 17th and 18th century,  which has been accredited to taking over the essential role of the sword as a important accessory to men’s fashion

– In the early 1700’s, the first settlers in America used canes as a status symbol of wealth and refinement. In addition to its value as a decorative accessory, it also continued to fulfil some of the function of the sword as a weapon

– A gentleman had to procure a license for the privilege of carrying a cane and subsequently had to abide by certain carrying privileges, violations of these privileges included; to carry a walking stick under one’s arm, to brandish it in the air, drag it on the ground or to lean on it while standing

– The Puritans passed laws that forbade extravagant dress or displays of wealth. This, in turn, altered the perception and appearance of the canes and walking sticks used.

-During the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century, canes became mass manufactured and once again became a standard in gentlemen’s fashion.

– During this time specialty canes such as ‘Gadget Canes,’ those that have a secondary hidden function such as concealing a sword or pool cue and ‘Tipping Canes’ which carried alcohol were quite popular

– It was during the depression that canes fell out of fashion due to their non-essential nature as simply an accessory to dress and thus were relegated to users that required them.

– By the mid- 1900’s canes became viewed more as medical device, with little attention to design or form canes became clumsy, noisy and medicinal looking became. This is where the stigma of walking with a cane began.

Medical Alarms

– Home alert systems were conceived and developed in Germany in the early 1970s by Wilhelm Hormann with the aim of developing new comprehensive structures for ambulatory and non-ambulatory care for the sick, the elderly, those who live alone, and people with disabilities.

-The technical implementation succeeded with the help of AEG-Telefunken and was presented to the international public early in 1980. In 1982 the Hausnotruf Personal Emergency Response (PERS) system was distinguished with the Frankfurt Innovation Prize of the German

-In 1975 American International Telephone Company offered an emergency home phone system similar to Hormann’s. The user wore a medallion around the neck that when pushed delivered a preprogramed message to several phone numbers

-Wearable medical alarms became popularized in the early 80’s and continue to be commonly worn amongst senior and at risk populations.

– The user can decide between active medical alarms that require the person in crisis to trigger the device or a passive medical alarm that utilizes an accelerometer to determine if the user falls and then triggers the emergency response.

– Today there are a number of different devices that can be used to trigger an alarm such as; a pendant worn around the neck, a waist worn device, wristband, motion/radar detectors within the home and through a smart phone.

References

Schonfeld, E. (2010, May 3). History of Canes [Web log post]. Retrieved Dec 12, 2016, from http://www.fashionablecanes.com/ABOUT-CANES.html

Smith, M. (2008, June 12). History of Canes, Staffs, and Walking Sticks. Retrieved Dec,12,2016, from   http://canescanada.com/History-of-Canes-Staffs-Walking-Sticks_ep_49-1.html

At Guardian Angel Provides Integrated Connected Health Services for Seniors. Retrieved Dec, 12. 2016, fromhttp://www.healthtechzone.com.