Indigenous Poetics in Canada – Book Launch! Tuesday November 11th, 5-7 pm

Indigenous Poetics in Canada Book Launch; November 11th, 5-7pm; The Learning ZoneJoin us at the Learning Zone Tuesday November 11th, 5 – 7 pm, for the book launch of Indigenous Poetics in Canada presented by The Indigenous Visual Culture Program at OCAD U. With special guests editor Neal McLeod, authors Lillian Allen and Lee Maracle, with introductions by Mark Dickinson.

Neal McLeod, Associate Professor in the Indigenous Studies Department at Trent University was raised Cree on the James Smith Reserve in Saskatchewan. McLeod is also a National Aboriginal Poetry Award recipient for his first book of poetry, Songs to Kill a Wihtikow.

Authors Lillian Allen, Canadian “dub poet” and prolific First Nation writer Lee Maracle are among the twenty-eight contributors to Indigenous Poetics in Canada.

Indigenous Poetics in Canada

Featuring work by academics and poets, the book examines four elements of Indigenous Poetics. First, it explores the poetics of memory: collective memory, the persistence of Indigenous poetic consciousness, and the relationships that enable the Indigenous storytelling process. The book then explores the poetics of performance: Indigenous poetics exist both in written form and in relation to an audience. Third, in an examination of the poetics of place and space, the book considers contemporary Indigenous poetry and classical Indigenous narratives. Finally, in a section on the poetics of medicine, contributors articulate the healing and restorative power of Indigenous poetry and narratives.

Indigenous Visual Cultural Program (INVC) logo

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Drawings presented by Echo Railton’s 1st and 2nd year classes

Observational drawings from Echo Railton’s first and second year drawing (DRPT 1CO2) and figurative class (DRPT 207) are currently on display at the Learning Zone.

 

 

 

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xpace: External Space: First Impressions (The Art of Boat Names) by Emily Waknine

First Impressions (The Art of Boat Names) by Emily Waknine 2014First Impressions (The Art of Boats Names) is a 16 mm animated film produced by Emily Waknine, exhibited in loop video format at the Learning Zone. Inspired by the absurdity of boat names guided by the premise that all boats should have a name the film explores by the visceral usage of hand drawn text that flows, melts or dissolves into the singleness of each wave.

The playfulness of each boat name is reduced to words, as boat names are striped away from the boat image, facilitating an imaginary interpretation of the boat and owner. This removal separates yet emphasizes the emotional association of boating as a social, personal and sometimes obsessive activity.  The alphabetical cataloguing lays down a structure which contrasts the organic peace and freedom which boating usually represents.

Breaking the formal structure of the piece, one element illustrates the boat name on a complete image of the boat including the owner and his dog.

The rhythm of waves lapping against the hull is heard on the soundtrack, synchronized with the visual patterns of the animation.

First Impressions speaks of the temporal nature of a wave, the motion of the water, and the glimpses we get into the life of the owner when we meet the boat. First impressions are fleeting, and Emily’s work is a tender look at these fleeting glances.  Tori Mass

First Impressions (The Art of Boat Names) by Emily Waknine 2014

On until October 1st at the Learning Zone.

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OCADU RECYCLES! OCTOBER 22 & 23 at Butterfield Park – rain or shine

OCADU Recycles October 22/23 2014; Green Exchange & Material Trading Post

Join us October 22nd and 23rd for OCADU Recycles, in association with Waste Reduction Week of Canada.  This event will be held in Butterfield Park—rain or shine! OCADU Recycles is a collaboration  of OCADU Library’s Learning Zone, the Indigenous Visual Culture Program, Facilities, Planning & Maintenance and Office of Diversity, Equity and Sustainability Initiatives (ODESI).

Be a part of OCADU’s ongoing sustainability initiatives—trade in your old art and design supplies. Find something new for your next art project or share ideas, knowledge, and discover new materials to feed your imagination. Exchange or recycle outdated technology that can be re-purposed into art, or managed for safe disposal. The range of materials at this year’s OCADU Recycle event have been expanded to include previously used OCAD U furniture.

OCADU RECYCLES October 22/23 2014; 10 to 3:30 pm in Butterfield Park

Excited to get involved? Students, faculty and staff are all welcome to donate, recycle, upcycle and repurpose any leftover or underused art materials and electronics.

Donations can be brought directly to Butterfield Park during the event or to the Learning Zone prior to the event dates. Examples of acceptable items are: computers, hard drives, cell phones, printer cartridges, household batteries, paint brushes, magazines, fabrics.

Please remember to erase all data from electronics before dropping off these items. We cannot accept kitchen electronics or electronics that came in contact with water or encased in wood. 

To learn more about acceptable and non-acceptable items to donate or recycle at this event, please read Greentec Think Recycle. Non-acceptable items will be turned over for responsible recycling by professionals GreenTec, Think Recycle, RPR Environmental and Green For Life.

All students, faculty and staff are encouraged to participate even without bringing or offering items for the event: it’s a great opportunity to learn about other OCAD U sustainability initiatives, and resources related to disposal and reduction practices.

Check out the image link below to find artwork using recycled materials and discarded electronics:

Mandela by Jane Perkins

hongkiat.com

 

Michel de Broin

Michel de Broin

 

 

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“How Are U, OCAD U?” Research Project

How Are U OCADU? Research; CROS 4B02 Art & Design Education Lab: Community Leadership led by Dr. Pam PattersonMany changes at OCAD U this year, let’s talk about it!

OCAD University is experiencing a growth—new Deans, programs and courses amidst the challenge to find the resources to support the expanding activities, while trying to find the time to navigate through the university program, as well as personal objectives including curriculum, exhibitions, events, and deadlines.

Finding the opportunity to evaluate and share the experience of our learning environment can be hard to manage, but some important questions need to be asked:

How is teaching and learning working for you at OCADU? What are some of the assumptions that are made about an OCAD U students, and what is expected of us as students, artists, and members of the university community? Better yet, how have we worked collaboratively for change? What coping strategies have we found? What groups we have organized?

CROS 4B02 Art & Design Education Lab: Community Leadership Students led by Dr. Pam Patterson

Dr. Pam Patterson’s students from CROS 4B02 Art & Design Education Lab: Community Leadership class invites all students, faculty, staff and alumni to engage and contribute to their research project How Are You OCAD U, hosted in OCAD U Library’s Learning Zone.

Students from this class created an installation wall featuring questions about how OCAD U functions as a learning community, seeking critical perspectives as well as feedback on what is successful in our environment and should be expanded.

Towards the end of the semester responses collected from this research project will be compiled and reflected in a handmade publication to share amongst the OCAD U community.

Please come by the Learning Zone to share your experiences, add your questions and comments to our wall. Bring your issues, perspectives and ideas forward!

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