Posts Tagged ‘art’

Danielle Coleman & Mashayla Richie Abstract Works

Danielle Coleman & Mashayla Richie paintings, 2017

This exhibition features a series of works by two abstract painters from OCAD University; Danielle Coleman and Mashayla Ritchie.

Both artists bring a distinct approach to their work. Ritchie experiments on mixed media and texture with application and technique, while Coleman introduces experimental materials and old world imagery.

Mashayla Richie, 2017

Works featured by Ritchie includes studies and abstract paintings.

Acrylic paint and oil pastel/sticks are explored on miscellaneous surfaces. Utilizing plastic baggies as piping bags for acrylic paint, she creates an intrigue to the overall composition and texture of the work. In combination with an unconscious train of thought, these works embed past felt emotions and mental states.

Material experimentation is important to Danielle Coleman’s art practice. The use of glitter, protective sponge liner, electrical tape and floral textiles and her studio’s atmospheric component of disco and alternative break up tunes frames a context for the creative process.

Danielle Coleman

Combinations of colours reflect kitschy, nostalgic graphics and retro floral textiles through mixing vibrant, reflective and neon acrylic paints. Works seek to visualize the kitsch feeling of heartbreak of post relationship status.

Visit the Learning Zone Gallery.

On until October 28

 

 

06

10 2017

Figure 1 Exhibition

Soft Pink Forms by Clara Lynas

This month and until the end of June, the Learning Zone presents Figure 1. It’s a new exhibition which “engages with the tradition of figurative representation”.

Figure 1 showcases artwork from twelve OCAD University students working in various media and artistic styles to depict the human form.

Approaches range from realistic life painting to the exploration of abstract forms.  Some artists chose to focus on expression, gesture, or emotion, while others tackled our relationships to objects, each other and the spaces we occupy.

Feeling Hot Dysphoria, 2017, Will Brask

Francis Tomkins curated Figure 1 and includes works by Misbah Ahmed, Alexandria Boyce, Wil Brask, Will Carpenter, Jisu Lee, Wenting Li, Clara Lynas, Natalie Mark, James Okore, Rem Ross, Brianna Tosswill, and Dalbert Vilarino.

Figure 1 Exhibition, 2017

On until June 29

 

 

17

05 2017

Student Profile: Khadija Aziz

Khadija AzizKhadija Aziz identifies herself as a Toronto artist and creative entrepreneur and will be entering her 3rd year at OCAD University majoring in the Cross-Disciplinary program Life Studies. Khadija is known for creating art that is intuitive and explorative. She is constantly experimenting with a variety of media and surfaces, challenging traditional approaches to art making.

She grew up in a community of mostly immigrants—she was the only student in her cohort to pursue a post-secondary education in art and design. That inspired her to found the company Sketchbook Toronto, a financially accessible portfolio development program for youth between the ages 15 to 20, to assist youth in seeing opportunities in creative culture. The company provides a bridge between not knowing and knowing.

Learning Zone: What influenced your decision to major in Cross-disciplinary Art: Life Studies?

Khadija Aziz: The main reason I decided to pursue Life Studies is because it was cross-disciplinary. I wasn’t sure what exactly my strength was in art at that time, so I liked that in Life Studies, I would have access to multiple disciplines in the Faculty of Art, which meant that I could always be learning and trying new things that I couldn’t if I chose to stick to one discipline. And now I love that I meet students and professors from across the disciplines and I get to learn a lot about everything.

What are you looking most forward to in entering your 3rd year studies at OCAD U?

I’m looking most forward to our core Life Studies class because it’s always the most interesting. The projects have always been engaging and challenge me to further my practice and ideas about what art is and could be. I’m excited to learn the new approaches, methods, critical thinking and problem-solving through art in that class, and also the rest of my 3rd year.

Khadija Aziz, self-portrait

What two art supplies could you not live without?

Gouache paint and archival ink pen.

Has attending art school helped you develop your own personal style. If so, how?

Yes, of course. OCAD U kept me in touch with contemporary styles, critical thinking, and approaches that local and global artists use in their work. I’ve also been motivated to practice and experiment with different media and surfaces that I might’ve not known even existed. It’s all about being part of the artist community that’s really exciting.

How would you describe yourself as an artist?

Intuitive and spontaneous. I experiment a lot in my practice so I’m always open to trying new things, making mistakes, and especially learning to make that mistake part of my work.

Khadija Aziz, LandandScape_

What excites you most about the material you work it? Is there another medium you would like to work with?

 I would like to experiment and explore this year with transparent acrylic sheets to play with layering and sculpture.

What are 3 likes and 3 dislikes of yours?

Likes: desserts, paper, lakes/rivers

Dislikes: summer, darkness, the colour orange

You’ve recently been elected as the Director of Diversity and Equity for the OCAD U Student Union. What is your role and what do you hope to achieve?

My role is a new role at the Student Union, so I hope what I’m working on will be continued after my term ends. I would like to design ways to engage more students by empowering them to lead and create change at school. I want to enable students to be the ones to help OCAD U celebrate and raise awareness of diversity and equity issues.

How do you promote yourself?

I promote myself through social media and I attend lots of creative and leadership conferences. They’re great spaces to meet other emerging and professional artists, entrepreneurs, and change-makers who could be potential collaborators and of course, amazing friends. The rule I go by is just, “show up”. Show up to wherever you’ll meet people who you want to be like, learn from them, and always stay motivated.

What are your plans when you graduate?

I would like to continue with Sketchbook Toronto and work on a business plan. I’m considering doing a Masters but I’m not sure in what yet, or maybe I’ll look into alternative ways of learning. I don’t know exactly what I want to do, but somewhere along the lines of creative innovation.

 

17

08 2016

Responding to a Historical Aesthetic

From Dec. 16th-Jan.31st, a new exhibition, Responding to a Historical Aesthetic, will be on display at the Learning Zone.

From left to right: Rachel Lee, Erika Lee, Apoorva Varma, Rebecca Markus, Connor Gillet, Domenic Sgambelluri

From left to right: Rachel Lee, Erika Lee, Apoorva Varma, Rebecca Markus, Connor Gillet, Domenic Sgambelluri

 

The students of Lynne Heller’s third year Material Art & Design course Fibre History Since 1800 have created textile art pieces that use distinctive characteristics from different periods in art history. By learning about the work made by others, the students used their research to inform their own techniques and create something new and contemporary in the process.

 

Meaghan Lacroix - Deco inspiration

Meaghan Lacroix – Deco inspiration

 

Techniques such as embroidery, crocheting, sewing, and quilting are used to create a diverse range of fashion aesthetics. Together, these production methods demonstrate the evolution of the use of fibre from natural animal and plant based fibres to the introduction of artificial and synthetic materials in the 20th century. It’s interesting to examine the materials used and their functions throughout different socio-cultural movements. Within a fashion framework it’s fun to see how dress, as a form of self-expression, progresses throughout history and how in many ways we have to look back in order to move forward.

 

Miranda Victoria - Gothic revival in the style of embroidery - Embroidery piece copy

Miranda Victoria

Hillary Dubé

Hillary Dubé

 

 

 

 

 

 

FullSizeRender

Domenic Sgambelluri

Here’s an excerpt from Domenic Sgambelluri’s write-up: “My piece is a unisex blouse that draws its motif from the art deco period. It features a band of trapunto quilting at the bottom of the piece which resembles an architectural frieze that might be found on a skyscraper built during the 1920s. […]For me, the piece contributes to a trend of designing degendered clothing that are not solely designed for functionality, but create a new aesthetic and silhouette that is appealing to both genders.”

Alyssa Manalo - Welcome to the 70's

Alyssa Manalo – Welcome to the 70’s

These pieces have a life of their own and reflect the spirit of an era. Stop by the Learning Zone today to check them out!

20

01 2016

Feminist Fomo Nomo Art Exhibition: Performative Period Manifesto Workshop with Holly Timpener December 1, 12 – 2pm

Image of card flyer promoting Performative Period Manifesto Workshop with Holly Timpener December 1st, 12 - 2pm at OCAD U Learning Zone. Share your period stories and create a manifesto for a new shameless future for menstruation.

Join us Tuesday December 1, 12 – 2 pm for the Perfomative Period Manifesto Workshop with Holly Timpener. Followed with a live performance of the manifesto in the halls of OCAD U.

Performative Period Manifesto Workshop is part of the ongoing Feminist FOMO NOMO: What Does Feminism Mean To You? Exhibition.

Holly Timpener investigates and instigates issues relating to gender, feminity, sex and sexuality and identity with her performances. Come and share your period stories to create a manifesto for a new shameless future of menstruation.

Highlights from the opening reception held November 10. Photographs and videos courtesy of Nazanin Khani.

 

 

Feminist FOMO NOMO: What Does Feminism Mean To You? Exhibition offers a range of multi-disciplinary artwork—videos, printmaking, installations, digital prints that address inclusiveness and multiple expressions of what Feminism means to each of the participating artists.

On until December 6

Logos for OCAD University, OCAD Student Union, WIA projects, FAC (Feminist Art Conference)

 

29

11 2015


Use of this service is governed by the IT Acceptable Use and Web Technologies policies.
Privacy Notice: It is possible for your name, e-mail address, and/or student/staff/faculty UserID to be publicly revealed if you choose to use OCAD University Blogs.