Posts Tagged ‘graphic design’

Student Profile: Aicha Niazy

Aicha Niazy

LZ: Can you tell us a bit about yourself? And the art you create?

AN: My name is Aicha Niazy, I am from Egypt and this is my first year at OCAD, I’m transferring from UTM, University of Toronto Mississauga. My program is Graphic Design; and so far it’s very interesting.

What influenced your decision to major in Graphic Design?

It’s really weird to be honest. When I was in grade 11 and 12, I was not thinking about graphic design at all, it didn’t even cross my mind. I was going to go into economics and then changed my mind to anthropology, criminology, or marine biology and then I kept on going through lists of programs. I was also interested in psychology. But in my last year, grade 12, I decided that I really wanted to be a designer. It’s because I look around me and find some awful designs and then I would find the urge to fix them but then I also wanted to know how people design all these things because when I think about it graphic design is in every single aspect of our lives. Everyone needs a graphics designer, be it firms and corporations, schools, doctors’ offices and hospitals and the list goes on, this is when I decided to major in graphic design.

What is your creative process?

Observing, I really like to observe, and see a lot of details around me, it’s what informs me

Where are you most productive, tell us about your creative space?

During the summer, I would say the beach or the sea when I’m floating on the water. Otherwise it would be in my room or when showering. When I get an idea, I try to develop it to a certain extent before I Google it because I want to see where my thinking will take me and without being influenced by the Internet.

What two graphic design tools could you not live without?

Sketchbook and a pencil, to write down my thoughts or illustrate them in some way also Adobe software programs like Illustrator, Photoshop and inDesign, these are the programs I mostly use at this point.

Is there another medium you would like to work in?

I would like to experiment with painting, I’m not a painter myself, I’ve never painted but lately I’ve been feeling the urge to paint. So, I would like to experiment and see what I get, just practice and do some sketches.

I’ve noticed on your online portfolio, Format, you were working in photography was that something that you were always interested in or have worked on?

Photography has always been interesting as an approach where I can capture things. For example if you have seen my series City Lights? It’s of water bottles with lights reflected on them, this is something that I would not see without the lens of the camera, with the camera lens zoomed in, it makes the lights really stand out, that’s the one thing I would like to experiment with, see what the camera captures what you don’t see with your eyes.

Do you have a preference of analogue over digital cameras?

I don’t have preference, yet. I have only been taking pictures for a year. However, I loved analogue in terms of how I get to develop my own film and print out the photographs, it just reminds me of the old times with pictures in albums, and as a kid I would always wonder how it worked, now I know. I’ve worked in darkrooms and also created photograms which was so much fun. And I did my own pinhole and took a few pictures with it. It was cool to experiment with the primary method of how the camera came to be.

Photogram

Would you like to keep the photographic aspect of your work separate from graphic design or would you integrate them together?

If I worked with photography I would integrate into my graphic designs.

You wrote a paper on the comparisons of calligraphy with architecture?

The paper was basically discussing the calligraphy we see inscribed on architecture, and how these are designs (typographic designs), and their beautiful impact on architecture. In Islamic tradition there is no use of images or pictures representing prophets, and calligraphy is used as a form to transmit the words of god, written beautifully, to glorify it.

The most splendid mosques that I have come acrossed are Taj mahal, Hagia Sophia Mosque in Turkey, Sultan Hassan, Al-Refai and Muhammad Ali mosques in Egypt. I learned that there are different calligraphic scripts such as Kufic, Naskhi, and more. They are displayed in square forms, linear and sometimes even combined with designs like floral designs, mosaics, arabesques and of course it depends on the medium.

What do you enjoy most about studying graphic design?

It’s totally up to me to create the design from scratch but also the professors direct you, they give you the basics, even when you ask, they try to navigate you without telling you what to do so, it’s your own creative design.

What do you do to relax?

I read, workout and if the sea is there, I swim.

What is your dream job?

I don’t have a dream job right now. but I have standards for a job; it has to be a space that fosters creativity that ‘s very important to me.

What is your favourite thing about studying in Toronto?

Toronto is full of artists, designers, film festivals, different art related venues and events, and I live downtown so I don’t have to commute.

18

03 2015

Student Profile: Dennis Bartel – Graphic Design

Learning Zone: Can you tell us a bit about yourself?And the art you create?

Dennis Bartel: I’m in 4th year Graphic Design. I enjoy designing interactive forms like websites and PDF.

What influenced your decision to major in Graphic Design?

When I was working, designing was a way of relieving stress. Plus, I scored high in an aptitude test.

What inspires you?

Sports. Being a designer is like being an athlete; practicing and designing are the same because you are repeating a process over and over as it becomes more developed.

What is your creative process?

It depends on what I am designing. When designing typeface, I would research, do sketches and look at other work.

What is the best art tip you ever received?

Work in layers, start light and build up on it.

What two graphic design tools could you not live without?

Computer and pencil.

You have embraced social media as a material in your work. Why?

Because that’s the way people connect, to be part of things happening, I need to be connected.

Is there another medium you would like to work in?

Screenprinting, it’s a hands-on process.

 

 

How would you describe yourself as a graphic designer?

Conservative, but daring.

How do you promote yourself?

I promote myself using social media like LinkedIn, Facebook.

What do you enjoy most about studying graphic design?

Learning from failures.

What should potential graphic design students look for in an art school or art institute?

A place that has a good reputation in producing quality student work.

You opted for the graphic design thesis for your final year at OCAD, what was your project? Do you think that was the right path for your goals?

My thesis was on text message language and the creation of meaning. It was theory based, more about self-directed education than making a project. Not knowing the outcome and working through the process. I wish I had more time to produce more things.

What are your plans when you graduate?

Freelance, start a studio with other freelancers, and sleep.

What is your dream job?

Working identity design for a bowling centre.

What do you do to relax?

I go to movies and enjoy listening to the CBC comedy sketch show, The Irrelevant Show.

What is your greatest achievement to date?

Getting my degree.

Is there anything else you want to share with us, any final thoughts?

No matter what the teaching style is, don’t let that stop you from learning.

19

04 2013

Colours for Conservation

The Learning Zone is hosting a new exhibition of environmental activism posters, Colours for Conservation by Linda Montgomery’s first year students Colour in Context graphic design class.

Patagonia, a leading outdoor and sportswear apparel designer, collaborated with OCAD University first year design students last fall to create artwork inspired by the environmental concerns of local organizations.

The students brought forward their colour theory, graphic design and inter-personal skills to create original posters representing the voice of their chosen environmental organization. A few of the organizations represented were Friends of the Rouge Watershed, Not Far From The Tree, the Waterfront Regeneration Trust and Lake Ontario Waterkeeper.

[singlepic id=815  h=400 float =center]

The posters were exhibited at Patagonia’s King Street location, and a public poll selected the winning design. Patagonia donated a $1000 grant to Fatal Light Awareness Program (FLAP) in recognition of Avery Kua’s winning design representing their environmental message. For Avery, Patagonia awarded a new winter coat.

The runners-up of the contest were as follows: 2nd place Rachel Hurst (Greenbelt Foundation); 3rd place Jinhee Kang (Project Canoe) and Carmen Chan (Fresh City Farms); 4th place Seraphima Zibnitskaya (Citizens Concerned About the Future of the Etobicoke Waterfront); 5th place Michele Choong (Escarpment Biosphere Conservancy), Pei Ying Cheung (LEAF) and Katrina Mitchell (The PINE Project); 6th place Kaitlin Martin (Blue W), Vanessa Lira (Friends of the Rouge Watershed), James Pacitto (LEAF) and Brandon Meunier (The PINE Project).

This kind of collaborative project helps broaden horizons for young designers and gives their work greater meaning and foundation in their community,” said Faculty of Design Instructor Linda Montgomery.

The exhibition is on until March 7th. We hope that everyone will take this opportunity to see this wonderful collection of posters.

Visit Snap Toronto and Mountain Life to read more about this successful collaboration.

 

 

21

02 2013

The Uncertainty/Copenhagen Interpretation Poster Exhibition

Currently on view until December 15th, at the Learning Zone, The Uncertainty/ Copenhagen Interpretation Poster Exhibition featuring poster designs by the students of Robert Appleton’s Graphic Design 1 class.

Here is an insightful overview of the exhibit by Sab Meynert:

The study and interpretation of the physical world has been looked at through classical mindsets for centuries, using methods of measuring quantities of the micro, to qualify and map out our macro world. With Quantum physics, these old methods of measurement have become more obsolete as we learn the conceptual and intangible angles of our multiverse. In quantum physics there is the Uncertainty principle, which suggests that the more a particle is observed, the harder it becomes for it to be measured in terms of speed and movement, because the implications of that observation condition the movement itself. This means that every measurement exacted upon every particle thus far has conditioned it differently from its true unobserved self, and that therefore these measurements are uncertain to be true. Students were asked to create posters around this supposition.

12

12 2012

My Skateboard – My Voice

Shweta Sharma

Shweta Sharma
(not on exhibit)

My Skateboard – My Voice is the latest exhibition at the Learning Zone, exhibiting over sixty skateboard designs from the first year Graphic Design students of Linda Montgomery’s Drawing Translation Class.

Working in collaboration with Moguls in Mocean, a sporting goods store, the students were given the freedom to use the company’s name and logo, designed by Canadian Typography designer Paul Sych, to express their voice through a graphic and visual design.

Awards were presented on October 1st for best design, runners-up and honourable mentions by Moguls in Motion owner, Evangeline Merkley and Manager Jacob Allen-Jordon both of whom selected the winning design.

Winner of best design belongs to Patrick Santos. Runner-ups are Alex Gebhardt, Shiva Tadayoni, Lauren Stewart and Shweta Sharma with Honourable Mentions to : Danyl Ahmed, Keeley Whitehead, Braden Loi, Evelynne Malangyaon and Dawa Bokhang.

My Skateboard – My Voice is on until October 31st.

Click to enlarge.

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10 2012


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