Posts Tagged ‘interview’

Summer in the Learning Zone = zines, books & fun

OCAD Zine Library

Summer in the city of Toronto can warm up very nicely with a host of cultural and diverse events and festivals. It’s also a great time for students to catch a breeze, relax and read. Which inspired me to ask the Learning Zone team a few summery questions.

Dylan North, Faculty of Design: Illustration.

Dylan North. Breeze, 2016

In recognition of International Zine month, what’s your favourite zine from the OCAD Zine Library?

I’ve read many of the zines in the collection…so I’ll just choose a personal classic; College Type Funnies by Chris Kuzma and Patrick Kyle.

What else has been on your summer reading list?

I haven’t been reading any books recently but I always love to kick back with a design annual from the 80s or 90s; Society of Illustrators, Graphis Poster, Graphic Design in Japan, JCA Annual and American Illustration to name a few.

Where’s your favourite place to cool down around or near campus?

The ROM on Tuesdays but the Learning Zone always has the air conditioner on blast.

Khadija Aziz, Cross-Disciplinary Art: Life Studies.

Khadija Aziz. Untitled, 2016.In recognition of International Zine Month, what’s your favourite zine from the OCAD Zine Library?

The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Fighting the Big Motherfuckin’ Sad by Adam Gnade.

I like this zine because Adam Gnade gives his readers a pep talk to overcome feelings of sadness and anxiety. He uses light, humourous, and real-talk language to address issues like how to deal with critics and haters in person or online, self-doubt, and positive and toxic friendships, to name a few—all of which students especially art students are very vulnerable too.

What else has been on your summer reading list?

The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology that Fuel Success and Performance at Work by Shawn Achor.

Achor emphasizes the importance of focusing and acknowledging positive psychology, which means to invest our time and resources in understanding what makes humans happy, and then asking ourselves how we can make ourselves happier.

One exercise Achor mentions is to note three good things of each day at the end of that day. Write them in a notebook, your phone, or best yet—do this with a friend to hold each other accountable for being happier. This keeps us constantly and consciously looking out for the positive parts of our days. We become actively engaged with our positive energy and wake up wondering what will be on our list tonight.

Where’s your favourite place to cool down around or near campus?

My absolute favourite place to cool down near campus, even in the winter, is by the lake near Harbourfront, and my favourite way to get there is through Simcoe St.

Tetyana Herch, Cross-Displinary Art: Publications and 2016 Publications Medal recipient.

Tetyana Herych. Collage, 2016

In recognition of International Zine Month, what’s your favourite zine from the OCAD Zine Library?

My favourite zine from the zine library right now is 3 Minute Girlfriend by Zeesy Powers, made in 2007. She put out a Craigslist ad, advertising that she will be your girlfriend for three minutes at xpace, on a specific date, between 1 to 6pm. The rest of the zine is various responses that she has received from users. It’s kind of really entertaining to read the amount of responses she generated just by including a cute picture of herself.

What else has been on your summer reading list?

I keep on bouncing from book to book but right now I’m enjoying The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood by James Gleick. It’s a lot better than The Book on Information by James Maiangowi.

Where’s your favourite place to cool down around or near campus?

My favourite place to cool down around campus is the library!

Tom Colleran, Faculty of Art: Drawing and Painting.

Tom Colleran, Self-Portrait, 2016In recognition of International Zine Month, what’s your favourite zine from the OCAD Zine Library?

I like the zine Feels Like Lavender by Madison van Riijn. Madison was part of my social group when I lived in Guelph. I enjoy reading stories written by people that I know and to see what kind of work they do. I like her style of linework used in this zine.

What else has been on your summer reading list?

I’m in between books right now. I’ve finished two Tom Robbins books, Half-A-Sleep in Frog Pyjamas and Skinny Legs and All. He has a good ability to mix his crazy theories into story lines a nice mixture of comedy and thought provoking ideas. I also enjoy looking through the American Illustrators and American Photography design annuals.

Where’s your favourite place to cool down around or near campus?

The Learning Zone, it’s pretty cool but I also enjoy just sitting on my front porch.

OCAD U Library Services: Learning Zone

Looking for a cool space to escape from the heat? Our summer hours are Monday to Fridays, 10 am to 6 pm until August 17th. The OCAD Zine Library is open to the public during these hours so, drop by and discover your favourite zine.

 

 

25

07 2016

Student Profile: Aicha Niazy

Aicha Niazy

LZ: Can you tell us a bit about yourself? And the art you create?

AN: My name is Aicha Niazy, I am from Egypt and this is my first year at OCAD, I’m transferring from UTM, University of Toronto Mississauga. My program is Graphic Design; and so far it’s very interesting.

What influenced your decision to major in Graphic Design?

It’s really weird to be honest. When I was in grade 11 and 12, I was not thinking about graphic design at all, it didn’t even cross my mind. I was going to go into economics and then changed my mind to anthropology, criminology, or marine biology and then I kept on going through lists of programs. I was also interested in psychology. But in my last year, grade 12, I decided that I really wanted to be a designer. It’s because I look around me and find some awful designs and then I would find the urge to fix them but then I also wanted to know how people design all these things because when I think about it graphic design is in every single aspect of our lives. Everyone needs a graphics designer, be it firms and corporations, schools, doctors’ offices and hospitals and the list goes on, this is when I decided to major in graphic design.

What is your creative process?

Observing, I really like to observe, and see a lot of details around me, it’s what informs me

Where are you most productive, tell us about your creative space?

During the summer, I would say the beach or the sea when I’m floating on the water. Otherwise it would be in my room or when showering. When I get an idea, I try to develop it to a certain extent before I Google it because I want to see where my thinking will take me and without being influenced by the Internet.

What two graphic design tools could you not live without?

Sketchbook and a pencil, to write down my thoughts or illustrate them in some way also Adobe software programs like Illustrator, Photoshop and inDesign, these are the programs I mostly use at this point.

Is there another medium you would like to work in?

I would like to experiment with painting, I’m not a painter myself, I’ve never painted but lately I’ve been feeling the urge to paint. So, I would like to experiment and see what I get, just practice and do some sketches.

I’ve noticed on your online portfolio, Format, you were working in photography was that something that you were always interested in or have worked on?

Photography has always been interesting as an approach where I can capture things. For example if you have seen my series City Lights? It’s of water bottles with lights reflected on them, this is something that I would not see without the lens of the camera, with the camera lens zoomed in, it makes the lights really stand out, that’s the one thing I would like to experiment with, see what the camera captures what you don’t see with your eyes.

Do you have a preference of analogue over digital cameras?

I don’t have preference, yet. I have only been taking pictures for a year. However, I loved analogue in terms of how I get to develop my own film and print out the photographs, it just reminds me of the old times with pictures in albums, and as a kid I would always wonder how it worked, now I know. I’ve worked in darkrooms and also created photograms which was so much fun. And I did my own pinhole and took a few pictures with it. It was cool to experiment with the primary method of how the camera came to be.

Photogram

Would you like to keep the photographic aspect of your work separate from graphic design or would you integrate them together?

If I worked with photography I would integrate into my graphic designs.

You wrote a paper on the comparisons of calligraphy with architecture?

The paper was basically discussing the calligraphy we see inscribed on architecture, and how these are designs (typographic designs), and their beautiful impact on architecture. In Islamic tradition there is no use of images or pictures representing prophets, and calligraphy is used as a form to transmit the words of god, written beautifully, to glorify it.

The most splendid mosques that I have come acrossed are Taj mahal, Hagia Sophia Mosque in Turkey, Sultan Hassan, Al-Refai and Muhammad Ali mosques in Egypt. I learned that there are different calligraphic scripts such as Kufic, Naskhi, and more. They are displayed in square forms, linear and sometimes even combined with designs like floral designs, mosaics, arabesques and of course it depends on the medium.

What do you enjoy most about studying graphic design?

It’s totally up to me to create the design from scratch but also the professors direct you, they give you the basics, even when you ask, they try to navigate you without telling you what to do so, it’s your own creative design.

What do you do to relax?

I read, workout and if the sea is there, I swim.

What is your dream job?

I don’t have a dream job right now. but I have standards for a job; it has to be a space that fosters creativity that ‘s very important to me.

What is your favourite thing about studying in Toronto?

Toronto is full of artists, designers, film festivals, different art related venues and events, and I live downtown so I don’t have to commute.

18

03 2015

Student Profile: Sam Pedicelli

Sam_Portrait001_

Can you tell us a bit about yourself and the art that you create?

I’m in 3rd year Drawing & Painting but I don’t do much painting anymore. I focus mostly on embroidered drawings.

How long have you been interested in art? How long have you known that you wanted to pursue art as a career?

My whole life, I knew that I had always wanted a job in the arts. The only time I questioned myself is when family and friends discourage me from pursuing it as a career.

What influenced your decision to major in Drawing & Painting?

I was most exposed to drawing and painting before I enrolled in OCAD but I think I’m better suited to the Sculpture or MAAD programs. My art is very dependent on installation and rarely just stops at painting.

What do you enjoy most about your program?

I like the flexibility, they are very open to other mediums.

What inspires you?

I’m inspired by conversations that I have with other people and my daily experiences. For example I recently did an extensive mold series because I had a lot moldy food in my house. I write a lot of notes and to-do lists so I made work about text. I like to include my hectic life into my art.

What is your creative process?

My creative process begins with writing and talking, rarely any sketching is involved.

What is the best art tip you ever received?

I overheard an instructor advising a student to make artwork that you can relate to, don’t make artwork that you have no association to.

What are your favourite tools to work with?

Thread, needles, different fabrics and dyes.

What two art tools could you not live without?

Needle and thread.

How would describe your work?

Very detail oriented and committed, it begins with an end in mind. I have to know where it will end up.

Has attending art school helped you develop your own personal style? If so, how?

Coming to OCAD taught me the importance to have a specific style so that people can recognize your work. It comes through a lot of failed art.

What are your plans when you graduate?

I’m divided between travelling or finding a good job. Maybe, I will pursue an art residency or internship.

What do you do to relax?

Drink wine and watch movies with friends.

What is your favourite thing about studying in Toronto?

The art scene is enormous, everyday it seems like there is a new gallery opening. Diverse neighbourhoods, you can walk one block and it’s like you are in a different city.

What do you feel is the biggest challenge facing students and artists today?

The massive sea of art, it seems that you come up with a great idea and somebody has already done it. You have to recognize when your idea is verbatim and to adjust it. Know enough about the art you are interested in, who’s done what.

Where is your favourite place to eat around OCAD U?

The Village Idiot and Pita Village.

 

 

 

 

 

30

01 2014

Student Profile: Dennis Bartel – Graphic Design

Learning Zone: Can you tell us a bit about yourself?And the art you create?

Dennis Bartel: I’m in 4th year Graphic Design. I enjoy designing interactive forms like websites and PDF.

What influenced your decision to major in Graphic Design?

When I was working, designing was a way of relieving stress. Plus, I scored high in an aptitude test.

What inspires you?

Sports. Being a designer is like being an athlete; practicing and designing are the same because you are repeating a process over and over as it becomes more developed.

What is your creative process?

It depends on what I am designing. When designing typeface, I would research, do sketches and look at other work.

What is the best art tip you ever received?

Work in layers, start light and build up on it.

What two graphic design tools could you not live without?

Computer and pencil.

You have embraced social media as a material in your work. Why?

Because that’s the way people connect, to be part of things happening, I need to be connected.

Is there another medium you would like to work in?

Screenprinting, it’s a hands-on process.

 

 

How would you describe yourself as a graphic designer?

Conservative, but daring.

How do you promote yourself?

I promote myself using social media like LinkedIn, Facebook.

What do you enjoy most about studying graphic design?

Learning from failures.

What should potential graphic design students look for in an art school or art institute?

A place that has a good reputation in producing quality student work.

You opted for the graphic design thesis for your final year at OCAD, what was your project? Do you think that was the right path for your goals?

My thesis was on text message language and the creation of meaning. It was theory based, more about self-directed education than making a project. Not knowing the outcome and working through the process. I wish I had more time to produce more things.

What are your plans when you graduate?

Freelance, start a studio with other freelancers, and sleep.

What is your dream job?

Working identity design for a bowling centre.

What do you do to relax?

I go to movies and enjoy listening to the CBC comedy sketch show, The Irrelevant Show.

What is your greatest achievement to date?

Getting my degree.

Is there anything else you want to share with us, any final thoughts?

No matter what the teaching style is, don’t let that stop you from learning.

19

04 2013

Student Profile: Tiffany Pang

LEARNING ZONE: Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

TIFFANY PANG: I’m in industrial design, finishing 2nd year.

What do you enjoy most about your program?

I enjoy the materials aspect of this program, being able to learn about different materials and techniques in order to use them.

How long have you been interested in art? How long have you known that this is something you wanted to pursue as a career?

I’ve been drawing since I can remember, my parents persuaded me away from studying art as a career. I tried engineering first but I knew that was not for me, so I went to study architecture. After completing my architectural technician diploma at Sheridan, I decided to come here, OCAD. I hated it at first but I’ve learned that it’s where I needed to be.

Where does your inspiration come from?

My inspiration comes from people with the mastery of their craft. On a personal level, I am impressed with the shop technician’s knowledge and expertise. I aspire to like them one day.

Do you have a best time of the day to work on your projects?

Usually late at night or early in the morning, when the shops are quiet.

What are your favourite tools to work with?

Hammers, lathes and milling machines.

What excites you most about the material you work with? Is there another medium you would like to work in?

I like hard materials like metals and plastics. I like them because they each have their own personalities and depending on what you do with them, they can respond differently; I like mastering how to understand them. I would also love to work with Tungsten.

Which project has given you the most satisfaction?

It was a failed project. We were briefed to make a tealight holder, so I tried to make a Stirling engine. I wanted the flame to power the engine — that was much too ambitious to complete in 2 weeks and having never lathed anything.

What two art supplies could you not live without?

Calipers and a square.

What kind of books do you enjoy reading?

I usually read technical books on how to do something. Do picture books count?

Is there any designer from the past you appreciate a lot?

Adam Savage. I admire his obsessiveness and dedication to his craft.

What are three likes and three dislikes of yours?

Likes: dogs, weaponry, watches; Dislikes: ginger, lack of integrity in work, the studio hours this term

Do you have a favourite place to eat around OCAD?

OCAD U free lunch!

What is your favourite thing about studying in Toronto?

I can bike everywhere.

Since you are involved in function and form in industrial design, you will appreciate the critical balance and its effectiveness in design. Do you think that these considerations map itself into your life or artwork?

I’ve always been interested in efficiency and practicality, but I’m not sure if aesthetics is a huge part of my life. I have been trying to embrace it.

14

03 2013


Use of this service is governed by the IT Acceptable Use and Web Technologies policies.
Privacy Notice: It is possible for your name, e-mail address, and/or student/staff/faculty UserID to be publicly revealed if you choose to use OCAD University Blogs.