OCAD University Photography Program

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Do you want $7,000?

The AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize Scholarship Program applications are due Friday, March 24 (11:59 EST)  This scholarship grants three awards of $7,000 to full-time students entering their final year of study.

Apply here: http://artmatters.ca/wp/aimia-ago-photography-prize-scholarship-form/

ARTISTIC CRITERIA:  The Aimia | AGO Photography Prize Scholarship Program recognizes extraordinary artistic potential in students studying toward bachelor’s degrees with a major or focus in fine art photography. For the purposes of the scholarship, “photography” can encompass any lens-based media, including video. The jury will focus on artwork that provokes a strong response and exhibits conceptual rigour, technical excellence and a dynamic engagement with contemporary photographic practice and theory.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES: Students will be asked to submit general information, as well as a 250-word artistic statement, summarizing their practice and offering contextual information about their portfolio. Their portfolio can include:

  • Up to 15 .jpeg images, uploaded to the scholarship website.
  • Up to 2 video works with a total running time of no more than 5 minutes, uploaded to Vimeo.
  • Full credit information for each work, including artist’s name, title, date and medium and dimensions.

The portfolio should include a focused selection of artwork produced anytime over the course of the student’s undergraduate degree.

TERMS OF ELIGIBILITY

All applicants must meet and/or agree to the following terms and conditions:

  1. Only full-time students in their final year of study are eligible for the scholarships, and students must apply during the prior academic year.
  2. Students must be registered at OCAD U or one of the other partnering schools.
  3. All applicants must be in good academic standing at the time of application and at the time the scholarship is awarded.
  4. Students must meet all application deadlines. Late materials will not be accepted under any circumstances.
  5. Students must apply using the online submission form and upload support materials online, as instructed by the submission guidelines.
  6. Winning students must be willing to attend a special event in Toronto, scheduled by Aimia and the Art Gallery of Ontario, with a faculty member in recognition of their achievement.
  7. Artwork by all 16 finalists will be used by the AGO and Aimia on the prize website, in press communications and in promotional materials relating to the scholarship program.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to Jenn Long at jlong@faculty.ocadu.ca

Come Hang: Snack and Chat

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Friday #ArtCrush: Sebastian Perez Vicentini

 Friday #ArtCrush is a weekly blog series highlighting students in their final year at OCAD University.  

This Friday’s #ArtCrush is Sebastian Perez Vicentini, a fourth year student majoring in Photography.

In this issue, Morgan and Sebastian talk about the politics of responsibility in representing other peoples’ stories, working within multiple mediums and complicating ideas to create new possibilities in art.

~

 

Who or what are your main artistic inspirations?

I tend to become obsessed with some artists work at different points in my life. I used to do a lot of self-portraiture and could stop looking at the work of Blanca Haddad, and the early work of Adam Neat, I liked it so much that I just wanted to do exactly what they were doing. Eventually I stopped looking and began doing my own thing, developing my own style and obsessions until my work overpowered their influence. So, I like to understand my influences in depth rather than saturate myself with images or ideas or anything.

 

What subject matter do you tend to spend the most time working on?

In the past few years I have spent most time working on themes of violence, protests, and how our bodies are political. I have touched on these issues in many different ways, and trying to reinvent the ideas, contradict them and see what happens.

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Can’t be called dead, 2015

 

What drives you to work with that subject matter?

I guess I am trying to understand the part I play within these issues. I think sometimes is an act of denunciation, or self-criticism. Definitely I am always looking to detonate emotions and ideas in others and myself.

 

Do you work in any other mediums and how does that inform your work?

I try to work with any mediums that help me communicate and complicate an idea. I enjoy working with sculpture, printmaking, and drawing; using hands and making tangible things that I can later develop through photography or something. So, mixing disciplines opens up my field of view and keeps me interested and at play. But I still find photography to be the ultimate mediator, it’s like the Avatar because it can embody all the other disciplines, and contrary to what most people say I find the beauty and social value of photography in its reproducibility and dissemination.

 

What body of work are you currently working on?

I am currently creating a body of work for thesis that focuses on the student protest of 2014 in Venezuela. In this work, I am making sculptures and photographic explorations of some of the students that where killed during these protests to speak of issues of institutionalized violence, memory, fear, and social division.

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Praying card in honour of Bassil, 2017.

 

The work you are doing for your thesis explores the artist’s responsibilities while sharing other people’s stories, especially when they are related to social and political violence. How do you navigate this emotional attachment you can find with the individuals you are highlighting, specifically when their lives are or could be similar to yours (age, gender, nationality wise)? Have you had any significant reflections while doing this work?

I think we all have responsibility to speak about these issues, not only as artists but also as human beings. Because although my artwork is specific to Venezuela and its complexities these type of issues are happening all over the world at different levels; violent repression in the United States, Mexico, you name it. I think that is were the emotional attachment comes to play, there is social discontent, and people receiving political bullets in a lot of places (and not far away from Toronto), and yes we are all participants of the violence. But when you think one of these students could be you, then this issue doesn’t feel alien and un-relatable. The thing is that back home it is normalized.

 

What do you see as the artists’ responsibility in reflecting the current social and political environment in which they live?

It is important to reflect on the day-to-day, and the mundane to understand our position in the social environment, the personal is political. Everything we do is political without being directly about politics; our sexual life, the way we eat, how we move through the public space, and the way we relate to institutions. These interactions transcend into bigger social implications and it is our responsibility to reflect on them.

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The critique boat, 2016

 

Your work touches on social, economic and political issues in Venezuela. How do you navigate being Venezuelan and working around social issues in Venezuela, but working in Canada?

Well I work around issues that preoccupy me on the daily. Sometimes I feel it is not effective to talk about Venezuelan issues in the context of Toronto. But I think that tackling these issues symbolically can detonate emotions and creates reflections about what happens here too.

 

What do you think the value is in being a multi disciplinary artist and interweaving multiple mediums into your art practice?

I just think it opens up the possibilities. If I work in one medium for too long I develop tunnel vision and become stuck. Especially as students discovering ideas and techniques there is no reason not to use all the OCAD toys.

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Saint Students (work in progress), 2017

 

Are their any specific OCAD U Faculty who have influenced your work? A specific discipline or course?

So many teachers have influenced me throughout my time at OCAD. I have learned the most from teachers like Katherine Kiloh, Jonathan Groeneweg, Simon Glass, and Paul Dempsey. Also, I remember in first year I had a class with Peter Bowyer; on the first day he took us dumpster diving to find materials for the class. I kept up with it, and I can proudly say that half of my living room and art materials come from the dumpster.

 

Do you have any advice for students beginning to study at OCAD?

Play as much as you can, and use all the facilities that OCAD has. Don’t just go about doing assignment after assignment; I think it is important to start creating themes early on, doing whatever you want and making the assignments fit to your personal practice.

 

To see more of Sebastian’s work, check out their website

 

See Sebastian’s work at the

102nd Graduate Exhibition at OCAD University, May 3rd-7th.

Friday #ArtCrush is a weekly blog series highlighting students in their final year at OCAD University.

Interview by Morgan Sears-Williams

About the writer: Morgan is a fourth year photography student and runs the Friday #ArtCrush series on the OCAD U Photography Blog. She loves speaking to other artists about social justice, how to break barriers within artist communities and nurturing the arts in alternative spaces. She is the Art Director for The RUDE Collective, a student representative on the Photography Curriculum Committee and has done workshops on intersectionality and allyship relating to LGBTQ folks. To see more, you can visit her website or her instagram.

Kotama Bouabane in Calgary!

Kotama Bouabane. NYC, China. 2011. C-Print 36"x24"

Kotama Bouabane. NYC, China. 2011. C-Print 36″x24″

When Form Becomes Attitude at Contemporary Calgary

117 8TH AVE SW . CALGARY, CANADA
Curated by Noa Bronstein
Main & Tall Gallery, March 16 – July 30, 2016

 What is the political life of a building, place or historic marker? When Form Becomes Attitude points towards this question in considering the role of monuments or concepts around monumentality in constructing cities, nations and ideologies. Featuring artworks by Maria Flawia LitwinBear WitnessKotama Bouabane (OCAD U Photo Alumni & Faculty)Morehshin AllahyariChristian JankowskiIsabelle Hayeur, Babak Golkar, and Shelagh Keeley the exhibition reflects on the negotiated intersections of design and power in which monuments are materialized. When Form Becomes Attitude also emphasizes how state-building relates to city-building, while tracing how monuments speak to the mechanisms of architectural memory. In many contexts, monuments are constructed representations of nationalism and political posturing. The artworks in this exhibition, however, raise further questions around how monuments can serve as architectural or materialized devices of resistance, performance and subversion.

 When Form Becomes Attitude further addresses ideas around posterity in our built environment and how a nation’s official representation of itself, in the case of state sponsored monuments, prompts larger negotiations surrounding the rendering of nationalism. Equally, or perhaps more importantly, the artists within this exhibition carefully mine around and between these official renderings as a way to consider the speculative use or abuse of monuments as agents of power, politicking, gentrification, geopolitics and globalization.

March 18, 2017 – 1:00 PM

Panel Discussion / When Form Becomes Attitude
Lecture // STEPHEN AVENUE LOCATION

Join Guest Curator, Noa Bronstein, and artists Kotama Bouabane, Maria Litwin, and Babak Golkar while they discuss the role of monuments and concepts around monumentality in constructing cities, nations and ideologies.

http://www.contemporarycalgary.com/whats-on/utopia-factory

Application Support, 12 today!

sm-applicagition-support

OCAD University is participating in the Aimia | AGO Photography Prize Scholarship Program!  This program awards three scholarships of $7,000 each to a student focusing on photography and entering their final year of study. If you would like support on this application, Associate Chair Jenn Long will be sitting outside of the Photo Cage and  available to help you today from 12-1:30 pm.  

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: Friday, March 24, 2017 at 11:59 pm EST

$7000 Scholarship Opportunity

OCAD University is participating in the
Aimia | AGO Photography Prize Scholarship Program!
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: Friday, March 24, 2017 at 11:59 pm EST
This program awards three scholarships of $7,000 each to a student entering their final year of study.

If you would like support on this application, Associate Chair Jenn Long will be sitting outside of the Photo Cage and  available to help you on Tues, March 14 from 12-1:30 pm.  

ARTISTIC CRITERIA:  The Aimia | AGO Photography Prize Scholarship Program recognizes extraordinary artistic potential in students studying toward bachelor’s degrees with a major or focus in fine art photography. For the purposes of the scholarship, “photography” can encompass any lens-based media, including video. The jury will focus on artwork that provokes a strong response and exhibits conceptual rigour, technical excellence and a dynamic engagement with contemporary photographic practice and theory.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES: Students will be asked to submit general information, as well as a 250-word artistic statement, summarizing their practice and offering contextual information about their portfolio. Their portfolio can include:

  • Up to 15 .jpeg images, uploaded to the scholarship website.
  • Up to 2 video works with a total running time of no more than 5 minutes, uploaded to Vimeo.
  • Full credit information for each work, including artist’s name, title, date and medium and dimensions.

The portfolio should include a focused selection of artwork produced anytime over the course of the student’s undergraduate degree.

TERMS OF ELIGIBILITY

All applicants must meet and/or agree to the following terms and conditions:

  1. Only full-time students in their final year of study are eligible for the scholarships, and students must apply during the prior academic year.
  2. Students must be registered at OCAD U or one of the other partnering schools.
  3. All applicants must be in good academic standing at the time of application and at the time the scholarship is awarded.
  4. Students must meet all application deadlines. Late materials will not be accepted under any circumstances.
  5. Students must apply using the online submission form and upload support materials online, as instructed by the submission guidelines.
  6. Winning students must be willing to attend a special event in Toronto, scheduled by Aimia and the Art Gallery of Ontario, with a faculty member in recognition of their achievement.
  7. Artwork by all 16 finalists will be used by the AGO and Aimia on the prize website, in press communications and in promotional materials relating to the scholarship program.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to Jenn Long at jlong@faculty.ocadu.ca

 

Friday #ArtCrush: Sheana Canthan

Friday #ArtCrush is a weekly blog series highlighting students in their final year at OCAD University.  This Friday’s #ArtCrush is Sheana Canthan, a fourth year student majoring in Photography.

In this issue, Morgan and Sheana talk about how lighting changes the mood of her fashion shoots, collaborating with other artists and turning your art practice into a business.

~

Who or what are you main photographic inspirations?

My main photographic inspirations would be Annie Leibovitz, Nick Knight, Mario Sorrenti, Tim Walker, and Peter Lindbergh to name a few but, most of my inspiration comes from other art mediums and my surroundings as well.

 

What is your favourite lighting set up and camera/lens combination?

My favourite lighting setup would be rembrandt lighting. This lighting pattern gets its name from the painter, Rembrandt van Rijn who often utilized this light in his work.

brendan

Untitled #1, 2016

Can you walk us through how you set up the studio during one of your shoots?

For my shoots I usually set up the studio depending on whom or what I’m shooting and the concept/mood of the shoot. If the look is more grungy, I’d use a more harsh lighting setup, but if its something more eerie and whimsical, I’d use a softer lighting setup.

 

How does your shooting style change on location vs. in studio? How do you see these two options as changing the mood or lighting of your shoots?

When I shoot outdoors, I love scouting for different locations and having the subjects interact with their surroundings vs. in studio unless I have a set stylist working with me, sometimes I might be limited on props and create a story around what resources I have. Depending on whether I shoot on location, or in studio, I always preplan the lighting setup that best conveys the mood for the story I have in mind.

 

What subject matter do you tend to spend the most time working on?

The subject matter I tend to shoot the most are people and fashion.

delaney-1

Untitled #2, 2016

Do you collaborate with other artists on your shoots? What do you see as valuable about collaborations between artists?

I do collaborations with all types of artists whether it is a stylist, illustrator, a sculpture and installation artist or painter. I love mixing other mediums of art with my work. I think its important to collaborate, because it allows you to expand your horizons and network with other artists, which is important in this industry.

 

When scouting or looking for models, who or what do you look for?

I usually have a theme or concept in mind that I want to execute and I search for models or people based on that. I also work with modelling agencies as well.

 

What makes you finalize the last couple images that you publish, after you have done a full shoot?

Usually images that strike to me or flow with each other and best convey the story or concept I had in mind for the shoot.

michael

Untitled #3, 2016

 

Where do you see your career path going and who would you most like to work with/for?

I would eventually like to shoot commercial or advertising work and be signed to an agency.

 

What is your advice for artists who are looking to make their art practice into a business?

This is something that I’m still learning so much about and its really trial and error and what works best for YOUR art practice. Something I wish I had started much earlier was collaborating, attending more networking events and building an online presence. The more people you meet, the more your work gets out there. Its really word of mouth in this industry, aside from have an online presence on social media platforms such as Instagram, Facebook and Youtube depending on what your art practice is.

nya-2

Untitled #4, 2016

 

Are their any specific OCAD U Faculty who have influenced your work? A specific discipline or course?

BETTY!!! Most of the work I produced in my first three years at OCAD was surrounding gender, sexuality and nudity. Betty really pushed me as a fine artist to think about my art practice and why I make art.

 

What is one piece of advice you would give to someone looking to collaborate with other artists?

REACH OUT TO THEM!!! The worst answer you will get is a no, and if so, there are a million other artists out there. (80% of the time it’s a YES)

~

To see more of Sheana’s work you can visit her website

and instagram: @sheanacanthan

~

See Sheana’s work at the

102nd Graduate Exhibition at OCAD University, May 3rd-7th.

Friday #ArtCrush is a weekly blog series highlighting students in their final year at OCAD University.

Interview by Morgan Sears-Williams

About the writer: Morgan is a fourth year photography student and runs the Friday #ArtCrush series on the OCAD U Photography Blog. She loves speaking to other artists about social justice, how to break barriers within artist communities and nurturing the arts in alternative spaces. She is the Art Director for The RUDE Collective, a student representative on the Photography Curriculum Committee and has done workshops on intersectionality and allyship relating to LGBTQ folks. To see more, you can visit her website or her instagram.

Napier, OCAD and Ryerson Universities collaborate:

Photo by Ava Cochrane, A Chair for My Mother, 2017

Photo by Ava Cochrane, A Chair for My Mother, 2017

Please join us on International Women’s day, Wed, March 8th, from 5-7pm for the opening of the Gender & The Lens exhibition at:

Ada Slaight Student Gallery, OCAD University
100 McCaul Street, 2nd floor (North side)
Wheelchair accessible

Artists Include: Maddie AlexanderYuling ChenClea Christakos-GeeAva CochraneMara Gajic, Antonio GiacchettiRaelene GiffinAshley HiltzJesse King,  Morgan Sears WilliamsMichael SeleskiFarihah ShahAlia Youssef Curated by Jennifer Long and Clare Samuel

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L to R:  Farihah Shah, Laden Hands, 2017, Michael Seleski, Spectrum, 2016, Alia Youssef, Rayhanah, 2016

The exhibit runs from Mon, March 6 to Sat, March 11 and showcases artworks by feminist-minded students and recent graduates from Ryerson and OCAD University whose artwork explores themes of gender through lens-based mediums.  Within this installation is a slideshow entitled When The Light Shifts, by members of WildFires: Women Photographers Network in Scotland.  This initiative is part of an  ongoing series of research and networking events  between Napier (Edinburgh) University,  Ryerson University and OCAD University that focus on gender and photography.  

Photos left to right: Ashley Hiltz, selections from A Woman's Guide manual, 2016, Clea Christakos-Gee, Alexandra Rose, 2016

L to R: Ashley Hiltz, selection from A Woman’s Guide manual, 2016, Clea Christakos-Gee, Alexandra Rose, 2016

In Fall 2016, a collaboration was formed through faculty members Mary-Ann Kennedy (Napier University), Jennifer Long (OCAD University), Katherine Parhar (Napier University) and Clare Samuel (Ryerson & OCAD University). With a focus on research and creating networks to explore current trends in gender and photography, we began piloting projects in Edinburgh and Toronto with the goal of sharing information and providing opportunities for art creation and dialogue.  The Gender & The Lens exhibition is the first public presentation of this network and in May 2017, we begin our first collaborative project, Create & Converse.  This research hub will be an online platform dedicated to artworks and dialogue by lens-based artists exploring themes related to gender.

Photos left to right: Yuling Chen, still from Adios, Catalonia, 2016, Morgan Sears Williams, still from Stop, 2017

L to R : Yuling Chen, still from Adios, Catalonia, 2016, Morgan Sears Williams, still from Stop, 2017

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L to R:  Raelene Giffin, Gatherer, 2016, Mara Gajic, Untitled, from The Room series, 2014

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Maddie Alexander, Antonio Giacchetti, & Jesse King, still from Interaction, 2016

 

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