OCAD U Photography Program

News about events, our community & opportunites

Month: March 2017 (page 2 of 2)

Friday #ArtCrush: Sheana Canthan

Friday #ArtCrush is a weekly blog series highlighting students in their final year at OCAD University.  This Friday’s #ArtCrush is Sheana Canthan, a fourth year student majoring in Photography.

In this issue, Morgan and Sheana talk about how lighting changes the mood of her fashion shoots, collaborating with other artists and turning your art practice into a business.

~

Who or what are you main photographic inspirations?

My main photographic inspirations would be Annie Leibovitz, Nick Knight, Mario Sorrenti, Tim Walker, and Peter Lindbergh to name a few but, most of my inspiration comes from other art mediums and my surroundings as well.

 

What is your favourite lighting set up and camera/lens combination?

My favourite lighting setup would be rembrandt lighting. This lighting pattern gets its name from the painter, Rembrandt van Rijn who often utilized this light in his work.

brendan

Untitled #1, 2016

Can you walk us through how you set up the studio during one of your shoots?

For my shoots I usually set up the studio depending on whom or what I’m shooting and the concept/mood of the shoot. If the look is more grungy, I’d use a more harsh lighting setup, but if its something more eerie and whimsical, I’d use a softer lighting setup.

 

How does your shooting style change on location vs. in studio? How do you see these two options as changing the mood or lighting of your shoots?

When I shoot outdoors, I love scouting for different locations and having the subjects interact with their surroundings vs. in studio unless I have a set stylist working with me, sometimes I might be limited on props and create a story around what resources I have. Depending on whether I shoot on location, or in studio, I always preplan the lighting setup that best conveys the mood for the story I have in mind.

 

What subject matter do you tend to spend the most time working on?

The subject matter I tend to shoot the most are people and fashion.

delaney-1

Untitled #2, 2016

Do you collaborate with other artists on your shoots? What do you see as valuable about collaborations between artists?

I do collaborations with all types of artists whether it is a stylist, illustrator, a sculpture and installation artist or painter. I love mixing other mediums of art with my work. I think its important to collaborate, because it allows you to expand your horizons and network with other artists, which is important in this industry.

 

When scouting or looking for models, who or what do you look for?

I usually have a theme or concept in mind that I want to execute and I search for models or people based on that. I also work with modelling agencies as well.

 

What makes you finalize the last couple images that you publish, after you have done a full shoot?

Usually images that strike to me or flow with each other and best convey the story or concept I had in mind for the shoot.

michael

Untitled #3, 2016

 

Where do you see your career path going and who would you most like to work with/for?

I would eventually like to shoot commercial or advertising work and be signed to an agency.

 

What is your advice for artists who are looking to make their art practice into a business?

This is something that I’m still learning so much about and its really trial and error and what works best for YOUR art practice. Something I wish I had started much earlier was collaborating, attending more networking events and building an online presence. The more people you meet, the more your work gets out there. Its really word of mouth in this industry, aside from have an online presence on social media platforms such as Instagram, Facebook and Youtube depending on what your art practice is.

nya-2

Untitled #4, 2016

 

Are their any specific OCAD U Faculty who have influenced your work? A specific discipline or course?

BETTY!!! Most of the work I produced in my first three years at OCAD was surrounding gender, sexuality and nudity. Betty really pushed me as a fine artist to think about my art practice and why I make art.

 

What is one piece of advice you would give to someone looking to collaborate with other artists?

REACH OUT TO THEM!!! The worst answer you will get is a no, and if so, there are a million other artists out there. (80% of the time it’s a YES)

~

To see more of Sheana’s work you can visit her website

and instagram: @sheanacanthan

~

See Sheana’s work at the

102nd Graduate Exhibition at OCAD University, May 3rd-7th.

Friday #ArtCrush is a weekly blog series highlighting students in their final year at OCAD University.

Interview by Morgan Sears-Williams

About the writer: Morgan is a fourth year photography student and runs the Friday #ArtCrush series on the OCAD U Photography Blog. She loves speaking to other artists about social justice, how to break barriers within artist communities and nurturing the arts in alternative spaces. She is the Art Director for The RUDE Collective, a student representative on the Photography Curriculum Committee and has done workshops on intersectionality and allyship relating to LGBTQ folks. To see more, you can visit her website or her instagram.

Napier, OCAD and Ryerson Universities collaborate:

Photo by Ava Cochrane, A Chair for My Mother, 2017

Photo by Ava Cochrane, A Chair for My Mother, 2017

Please join us on International Women’s day, Wed, March 8th, from 5-7pm for the opening of the Gender & The Lens exhibition at:

Ada Slaight Student Gallery, OCAD University
100 McCaul Street, 2nd floor (North side)
Wheelchair accessible

Artists Include: Maddie AlexanderYuling ChenClea Christakos-GeeAva CochraneMara Gajic, Antonio GiacchettiRaelene GiffinAshley HiltzJesse King,  Morgan Sears WilliamsMichael SeleskiFarihah ShahAlia Youssef Curated by Jennifer Long and Clare Samuel

image3

L to R:  Farihah Shah, Laden Hands, 2017, Michael Seleski, Spectrum, 2016, Alia Youssef, Rayhanah, 2016

The exhibit runs from Mon, March 6 to Sat, March 11 and showcases artworks by feminist-minded students and recent graduates from Ryerson and OCAD University whose artwork explores themes of gender through lens-based mediums.  Within this installation is a slideshow entitled When The Light Shifts, by members of WildFires: Women Photographers Network in Scotland.  This initiative is part of an  ongoing series of research and networking events  between Napier (Edinburgh) University,  Ryerson University and OCAD University that focus on gender and photography.  

Photos left to right: Ashley Hiltz, selections from A Woman's Guide manual, 2016, Clea Christakos-Gee, Alexandra Rose, 2016

L to R: Ashley Hiltz, selection from A Woman’s Guide manual, 2016, Clea Christakos-Gee, Alexandra Rose, 2016

In Fall 2016, a collaboration was formed through faculty members Mary-Ann Kennedy (Napier University), Jennifer Long (OCAD University), Katherine Parhar (Napier University) and Clare Samuel (Ryerson & OCAD University). With a focus on research and creating networks to explore current trends in gender and photography, we began piloting projects in Edinburgh and Toronto with the goal of sharing information and providing opportunities for art creation and dialogue.  The Gender & The Lens exhibition is the first public presentation of this network and in May 2017, we begin our first collaborative project, Create & Converse.  This research hub will be an online platform dedicated to artworks and dialogue by lens-based artists exploring themes related to gender.

Photos left to right: Yuling Chen, still from Adios, Catalonia, 2016, Morgan Sears Williams, still from Stop, 2017

L to R : Yuling Chen, still from Adios, Catalonia, 2016, Morgan Sears Williams, still from Stop, 2017

pairings2

L to R:  Raelene Giffin, Gatherer, 2016, Mara Gajic, Untitled, from The Room series, 2014

interactions

Maddie Alexander, Antonio Giacchetti, & Jesse King, still from Interaction, 2016

 

ENU_LogoV1_CMYK

 

Nadya Kwandibens at OCAD U!

Photography by Nadya Kwandibens, Red Works Photography

Photography by Nadya Kwandibens, Red Works Photography

This week we are excited to welcome Nadya Kwandibens to OCAD U to speak with the Directed Photo Studio class!   

Directed Photo Studio – Artist talk
Thursday, March 9th at 12:00
Rm 525, Level 5,  113 McCaul Street (Grange building)

If you aren’t able to attend the March 9th event, you are still in luck, Nadya will be part of the March 16th Bead & Read!  Bead & Reads are 2hr drop-in gatherings run at OCAD U’s Indigenous Visual Culture Centre, in which ideas, readings and craft skills are shared.  

Bead & Reads run every Thursday from 3 to 5pm
INVC Student Centre
Room 1401, Level 4, 113 McCaul Street.

nadya1

Photography by Nadya Kwandibens, Red Works Photography

Nadya Kwandibens is Anishinaabe/ Ojibwe from the Animakee Wa Zhing First Nation in northwestern Ontario.

In October 2008, she founded Red Works and in the same year began photographing a series entitled Concrete Indians. Since then Nadya has travelled extensively, photographing people and events throughout Canada and U.S.A. She has worked for numerous groups and organizations including the: National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation, First Nations Health Authority, Association for Native Development in the Performing Arts, Full Circle First Nations Performance, Miziwe Biik Development Corp., imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival, Native Earth Performing Arts, Centre for Indigenous Theatre, Kaha:wi Dance Theatre; and several individual artists, actors, musicians and role models.

Her photographic work is featured in numerous publications, websites, and media including CBC’s 8th Fire documentary series. Nadya was an invited artist-in-residence for the Native American Indigenous Cinema & Arts online exhibition, and has exhibited in group and solo shows in: Toronto, Thunder Bay, and Aurora ON, Edmonton and Calgary AB, Seattle WA, Cleveland OH, Boulder CO, St. Charles, Chicago, Aurora and Evanston IL, and Vancouver BC.

Nadya has travelled extensively for event coverage and portraiture sessions across the country, and continues to photograph new works for two series Concrete Indians and emergence. In addition to commissioned works, Nadya is also available for photography workshops and presentations for youth, universities, and community groups. She currently resides in Northwestern Ontario.

Photography by Nadya Kwandibens, from the series Concrete Indians

Photography by Nadya Kwandibens, from the series Concrete Indians

Friday #ArtCrush: Nyaomi

Friday #ArtCrush is a weekly blog series highlighting students in their final year at OCAD University.  This Friday’s #ArtCrush is Nyaomi, a fourth year student majoring in Photography.

In this issue, Morgan and Nyaomi talk about how to connect to people through art, the intersections of research and art, and using textiles and embroidery in image making.

~

 

Who or what inspires your art making?
Life, Love and people. In general I love connecting with people and art allows me to do that. Through this, my understanding of life has shifted and I’m thankful for that.
~
What subject matter do you tend to spend the most time working on? 
Since I spend a lot of time analyzing life, my subject matter tends to be about my experiences and those close to me. So it starts off really personal and I try to make it so more people can relate, not just me alone. I usually start at a place of hurt. My belief is there’s a lack of self love and this is the root of a lot of the issues we have relating to ourselves and others. To have more loving interactions and relationships, we have to unlearn negative ideologies that have been normalized.
~
artcrush3

NS Wallpaper, 2015. Originally a scan from handwriting.

~

What drives you to work on this subject matter?
Purpose. I believe that ultimately my purpose is to help others and art is my gift and vessel to do so. Art gives us a platform to inspire and stir up conversation, so I ask myself what conversations I’m trying to spark when creating. My aim is to bring awareness to what’s been repressed and present alternative perceptions.
 ~
You work a lot with portraiture, what do you believe makes an effective and compelling portrait?
Body language. 55% of our communication is body language.
 ~
Looking at the different works that you have done, how do you think your artistic practice has changed over time?
In past shows, all my work was photo based until 2015. More recently I’ve been creating textiles/patterns and working with fabric and embroidery.
In terms of subject matter I used to focus more on the black experience. For example Appreciation which is about black men and Preference Is Not Privilege I which is about skin and hair. This year I’ve been looking into alternative perspectives on depression, something that effects all races.
~
artcrush1

Preference Is Not Privilege I, 2013. Digital Photography. 73×38

~

You have mentioned before that research is a part of your process and how you work, how do you think research intersects with the art work you produce? 

Yes, Research is huge for me – it’s what grounds my work. However my research is not books and essays alone. I learn from fellow artists’ (singers/songwriters, screenwriters, all visual artists), conversations, and my experiences, etc. I am a student of life so I’m taking what I’m learning and expressing it visually. I start off with a topic, research it to understand it better, then share my understanding though art to have more conversations and shared learning.

 ~
Do you see your research and art separate or as intersecting elements?

Intersecting. Especially this year. I’ve learned so much about depression and myself while creating which  has informed the work. So the art making became a part of my research, it is a beautiful exchange. As a result the meaning of the work has shifted. And I am okay with that.

~

artcrush2

Rosa Seca, 2015. Embroidery. 10″ hoop.

~

Where do you see your career path going and who would you most like to work with?
I see myself becoming a full time artist connecting with like minded people to learn, grow, create and share.
 ~
How do you think your personal life has affected the kind of art work you want to make?
It is the biggest influence. All my work stems from a personal place.
 ~
unnamed-3
Appreciation, 2013, Digital Photography, 73″ x 38″ 
~
Are their any specific OCAD U Faculty who have influenced your work? A specific discipline or course?

Betty Julian!!! She reminded me to think critically about what I was doing. For clarification, she didn’t teach me to be hard on myself (that’s all me) but I knew not to come to her critiques with insincere work and contrived explanations. My art practice became stronger after Betty’s Current Practice class, so I always tried to be in her classes.

~
What is one piece of advice you would give to someone looking to collaborate with other artists?

Be open minded. We can learn a lot from each other when we let go of our egos. But know yourself. What is it you want to communicate with your art? Don’t be easily swayed by what others are saying and doing. Remember your truth.

~

To view more of Nyaomi’s work visit her website or check her out on instagram

~

See Nyaomi’s work at the

102nd Graduate Exhibition at OCAD University, May 3rd-7th.

Friday #ArtCrush is a weekly blog series highlighting students in their final year at OCAD University.

Interview by Morgan Sears-Williams

About the writer: Morgan is a fourth year photography student and runs the Friday #ArtCrush series on the OCAD U Photography Blog. She loves speaking to other artists about social justice, how to break barriers within artist communities and nurturing the arts in alternative spaces. She is the Art Director for The RUDE Collective, a student representative on the Photography Curriculum Committee and has done workshops on intersectionality and allyship relating to LGBTQ folks. To see more, you can visit her website or her instagram.

March 15th – Instagram Call

instagram-normal

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15TH, MIDNIGHT  is the deadline to submit your work for posting on the Photography Program’s Instagram account!  The concept for this account is to showcase the works of our students and department in an on-line portfolio.  It will act as a tool to help promote our students outside the university while also representing the strength of our program.

Call for submission:  Open to all students enrolled in the Photography Department regardless of year or stream.  Please submit works!!!  (Note: at least one image from every submission will be selected.)

What We Need:

-send us 5 images to select from

-file size 10 by 10 inches at 100 dpi

-file type .jpg

-please caption your images as follows:

Artist Name, Title of work, Year of work, Year of study, @insta username #ocadu_photo
example: Shey Lee, Untitled, 2016, 2nd year photo, @sheylee #ocadu_photo

-if your images are landscape or portrait format please adjust the canvas size & include a white border.

-Images should be colour corrected and sized appropriately.  We will not make any aesthetic decisions on your behalf.


When Do We Need It? As soon as you can send it!
(or else by midnight on March 15th)

Please send submissions to:  photoposts@ocadu.ca
Note: we do not send confirmation emails.

Farihah Shah – Timeraiser 150

Farihah Shah, P8, Prefix series, 2016

Farihah Shah, Untitled (P8), Prefix series, 2016

CONGRATULATIONS TO 2016 PHOTO ALUMNI  FARIHAH SHAH FOR BEING SELECTED FOR TIMERAISER 150!

What is Timeraiser?

Timeraiser is a party for social good, supporting artists and nonprofits. Here’s your chance to kickstart your art collection by giving back to your community. Bid volunteer time, not dollars, for original art by emerging Canadian artists. Bidding starts at 25 hours and maxes out at 100 hours. If a piece you love reaches 100 hours, anyone can match that bid and we’ll draw a winner at random from the 100-hour bids once the auction ends.  If you win, you have one year to finish volunteer hours and claim your piece of art. The best part? Volunteer with any nonprofit(s) you choose! Download the Timetracker app to keep track of all your volunteer hours and send them directly to us!

Timeraiser150 Toronto pulls out all the stops to throw a great party – from live performances to delicious local food and drink!

Wed, May 24th,  7:30 p.m. Doors open at The Power Plant
8:30-9:30 p.m. Art auction
Live band
12:00 a.m. Last call

This event sells out every year. Don’t miss out and get your tickets early!
Timeraiser150 is a Canada 150 Signature Project supporting emerging Canadian artists and nonprofit organizations.

Newer posts »

Use of this service is governed by the IT Acceptable Use and Web Technologies policies.
Privacy Notice: It is possible for your name, e-mail address, and/or student/staff/faculty UserID to be publicly revealed if you choose to use OCAD University Blogs.