OCAD U Photography Program

News about events, our community & opportunites

Category: Alumni (page 1 of 17)

Alumni Exhibiton: From The Ground Up

Recent alumni Aaron Jones is showing his amazing work as part of a group show! Go check it out before it closes on February 14th:

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Parks Canada Career Launcher – Deadline Jan 28

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Ishkhan Ghazarian: Rouge National Park Residency Opportunity

OCAD Photo grads have been lucky these past few years to be offered the opportunity of a career-launcher job in the Rouge Park.  Ishkhan Ghazarian is the most recent recipient, just finishing up this past December. This experience could be yours this coming year.

Ishkhan’s recent show was just reviewed in the Toronto Star. Check it out and if your are about to graduate, watch for the upcoming call for applications.

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2018/12/25/rouge-parks-photographer-in-residence-trades-the-office-for-a-forest.html

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IMPORTANT – Meet the Future – Share your Feedback

Administrative Search: Shortlist for the CHAIR of PHOTOGRAPHY, PRINTMAKING & PUBLICATIONS

A public lecture is a significant part of the selection process for new hires and this gives everyone the chance to give feedback to the committee before final decisions are made. Here are the 3 final candidates for a new Chair.

Please attend as many of these lectures as you can and share your thoughts. All are welcome.
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Kotama Bouabane
Talk/title: Let’s warm up a cool tone: Re-calibrating the fixed Image
Tuesday, November 20th, 2018
1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
113 McCaul St., Room 525

 Kotama Bouabane is a Laotian born artist and educator. He is a sessional instructor in Photography at OCAD University and holds an MFA in Studio Arts in Photography from Concordia University. Bouabane has shown extensively throughout Canada in notable galleries including Centre A, Vu Photo, Contemporary Calgary, Parisian Laundry and Gallery TPW. He has adjudicated many art juries including the Emerging Artists grant for the Toronto Arts Council and was on the nominating committee for the City of Toronto’s first Photo Laureate. His work has been published in Prefix Photo, Art Papers, Ciel Variable and most recently contributed to The Making of An Archive, initiated by artist Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn. Bouabane has received funding through the Toronto Arts Council, Ontario Arts Council and Canada Council for the Arts and will be a visiting artist in residence at Open Studio in 2019/20. He is currently the Co-President of the Board of Directors at Gallery 44 Centre For Contemporary Photography.

Emma Nishimura
Talk/title: Interpreting and re-negotiating history: exploring the third and fourth dimensions within printmaking and photography
Tuesday, November 27th, 2018
1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
113 McCaul St., Room 525

 Emma Nishimura’s work ranges from traditional etchings and digital prints to sculptural installations. Using diverse media, her work addresses ideas of memory and loss that are rooted within family stories and inherited narratives. Emma received her MFA from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (2013) and her BA from the University of Guelph (2005). Her work is in public and private collections and has been exhibited nationally and internationally. Emma is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Guelph. Previously she taught at OCAD University, Sheridan College and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She is the 2018 winner of the Queen Sonja Print Award.

 nichola feldman-kiss
Talk/title: that which has been witnessed
Wednesday, December 5th, 2018
1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
113 McCaul St., Room 525 OR 113 McCaul St., Room 512

 nichola feldman-kiss is a multi-disciplinary artist. Her research is socially engaged and performative. feldman-kiss’s artworks explore body, citizen, collectivity and hybridity. Her art and technology innovations have been supported by the National Research Council, the Ottawa Hospital Eye Institute, the Canadian Forces and the United Nations. feldman-kiss holds an MFA from California Institute of the Arts (CalArts). Her artworks have been presented in Canada, the United States, Mexico, India, and Europe.  She is an art and technology policy consultant and a former Officer for New Media and Audio at the Canada Council for the Arts.

Gallery 44 Career Launcher – call for applications

Specifically open to Recent OCADU Photo Grads, this is an amazing opportunity.
Apply NOW! The deadline is approaching fast – Tuesday, September 4.

This opportunity will provide access to Gallery 44 production facilities, equipment rentals and programming for one (1) year starting October 2018, for five (5) OCADU recent graduates, to support their upcoming exhibitions and professional opportunities. Recipients will also receive studio credits valued at $500, and opportunities to participate in G44 member’s exhibitions, workshops and events.

Here is the link:  Gallery 44 Production Membership Career Launcher 

Here is a PDF version: g44-career-launcher-2018-call

Summer Residency Opportunity in New York

Future of  Images: The Lens and Screen Arts
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Possible Work Opportunity

From: Brandon Hall <brandon.hall@sutherlandmodels.com>
Date: Monday, March 19, 2018 at 1:35 PM
To: “Collyer, Miles” <mcollyer@ocadu.ca>
Subject: ATTENTION ALL FASHION PHOTOGRAPHER’S

Good Afternoon  – I was speaking to one of your colleagues and he had mentioned to email you directly with the my request.  Could  you kindly post the following info to your Photography Students Blog / Board:

Sutherland Models,  one of Canada’s leading model agencies is looking to expand  their roster of   Fashion Photographer’s  for upcoming creative tests for their models.

If you are looking to work with some of the industry’s top models please,  contact me for a meeting:

Brandon Hall
Creative Director / Agent

Brandon.hall@sutherlandmodels.com

Sutherland Models Inc.
90 Sumach Street, # 403
Toronto, ON,  M5A 4R4
T: 416.703.7070

Faculty Spotlight: Meera Margaret Singh

When I first had Meera as an instructor at OCAD U, she was teaching a “Reconsidering Documentary Photography” course in my third year. I was looking for direction within my own artistic practice, which is rooted in documentary practices, and I needed a course that would – for lack of a better phrase – kick my butt. This course quite literally changed my view of documentary practices, ethics, aesthetics and foundations. As anyone who has had Meera as an instructor would know, she will push you into spaces you couldn’t conceive of. She won’t let you off the hook, and in the end you will end up with work that you didn’t know you could create.

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In this series of Faculty Spotlights, we chat with Meera Margaret Singh about her practice and her approach to being an artist, an educator and how those two collide.

 

How would you describe your art practice?

My lens-based art practice (photography and video) has always revolved around a negotiation and exploration of intimacy and displacement. This has predominantly been examined through individuals and their landcape, be that physical or psychological. I often construct and examine various relationships between body and environment, while further exploring the suspended space that exists between the real and the fabricated, the historical and the contemporary.

As a mixed-race Canadian of South-Asian descent, I am negotiating identity as shifting and malleable through both my daily life and my artistic practice. I have created numerous works that attempt to reconcile ideas of ‘home’ in both space and body by exploring ideas of displacement; often as physical or gestural manifestations that serve as metaphors for cultural displacement.

Of key importance to me while presenting my work is creating an intimate, minimalist and accessible space; one that is not as didactic as it is an invitation for diverse viewers to question what is happening in each work and to allow the space for them to insert their own experience.

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What is your favourite course or theme/topic to teach?

I really love teaching studio/seminar courses that allow for discussion about photography and representation, power dynamics at play in the relationships between subject/photographer, the complexities of the gaze, and feminism/intersectionality and its relationship to the lens. Courses like “Reconsidering Documentary Photography”, “Contemporary Issues”, “Current Practice” are wonderful for allowing for these discussions. I’ve been teaching INTAC (International Art Collaboration) with Peter Sramek for 4 years now and I adore teaching this class, as it takes a specific student to be interested in collaborative work and cross-cultural experience. It’s a very special space for learning. I am also teaching Colour Photography this semester which is so rewarding, as I get to share and witness the magic of the colour darkroom with students who are using it for the first time. 

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How does teaching arts affect how you approach your own art practice?

Being in a teaching environment where people are dedicated to sharing their diverse perspectives and experiences as expressed through their art definitely inspires both my teaching and my art practice.  The classroom is a unique space where everyone makes themselves vulnerable in some capacity: professors and students alike. I always feel it’s a very privileged space to occupy: one where a group of individuals can discuss intention and output, particularly when most other disciplines focus solely on output. This dialogue and expression of intention is really profound for me. While actively listening to students describe their intentions, I am constantly checking in with myself about my own.

My work is also deeply connected to my interest in human experience and various levels of intimacy. I work closely with people/communities in my practice. This isn’t dissimilar to the classroom: creating safe and generative spaces for art to connect diverse individuals or communities.

 

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What do you think is valuable about having a fine arts focused education?

I came to Fine Art in a very unplanned way after completing a degree in Anthropology. I actually aspired to be an archaeologist. When I was introduced to photography, I never imagined the need for more schooling. While I did learn a lot of technique independently, I quickly realized that I needed a community around me to grow: for critique, community, support and critical dialogue. Once I made the decision to return to school, my professors really encouraged the need for using art (and, specifically, photography) as a means of transforming and communicating one’s experience and ideas. I can’t speak for everyone (because a formal fine arts education is not for everyone), but I can say that a fine arts education improved my problem solving skills, assisted me in editing my words and ideas to clarify meaning, granted me permission to dig deeper and further inside of myself. It introduced me to mentors I am forever grateful for. It provided me with a stronger sense of community and a space to figure out where I fit in in terms of theoretical/critical/historical/contemporary photographic frameworks. It also granted me the structure I truly rely upon to create my work.

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Meera Margaret Singh is a visual artist based in Toronto, Canada. She holds a BA in Anthropology, a BFA in Photography from the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg in Canada and an MFA from Concordia University, Montreal in Canada. Singh has been the recipient of numerous residencies and awards, most notably several Canada Council for the Arts production/creation grants, an Ontario Arts Council mid-career grant, and a Toronto Arts Council visual arts grant. She has been a selected artist at the Banff Centre for the Arts; artist-in-residence at The Art Gallery of Ontario; artist-in-residence at 1Shanti Rd in Bangalore, India; artist-in-residence at JACA Residency, Brazil; selected artist in an international residency with German photographer Thomas Struth at the Atlantic Centre for the Arts, Florida; scholarship winner and participant in the Magnum Workshop with photographer Alessandra Sanguinetti; visiting artist/instructor at the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad, India; McCain Artist-in-Residence at the OCAD University, Toronto. She has exhibited widely in group and solo exhibitions throughout Canada and internationally. She is currently an Assistant Professor at OCAD University.

Interview by Morgan Sears-Williams

Morgan is a photo alumni and runs the Friday #ArtCrush series on the OCAD U Photography Blog. She loves speaking to other artists about social justice, how to break barriers within artist communities and nurturing the arts in alternative non-institutional spaces. She is the Art Co-ordinator for The RUDE Collective, and has done workshops on photography basics, intersectionality and allyship relating to LGBTQ folks. To see more, you can visit her website or her instagram.

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