TECHNOLOGY IN TYPOGRAPHY

Since Johannes Gutenberg invented movable type and the printing press. The first type that was carved was blackletter, it was based on the handwriting style of the time. This was a technological advancement that allowed modern technology to flourish, and decorative and practical typefaces began growing in popularity. The early typefaces that were created based on handwriting were called serif and sans serif fonts. Soon after this, designers started developing their own style of typefaces such as Goudy Old Style and Garamond from the years 1500 to 1700. After that in the 1700’s transitional fonts like Didone in the 1700’s and slab in the 1900’s. From them typefaces weren’t just being designed for print. They were being used for everything from logo design to movie posters. 

Koenig’s double-cylinder steam powered printing press, 1814, public domain  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Koenig%27s_steam_press_-_1814.png

Koenig’s double-cylinder steam powered printing press, 1814, public domain
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Koenig%27s_steam_press_-_1814.png

The logo for CBS is one of the first really widespread logos. The CBS company wanted to make a symbol that would represent the company and one that made sense to the branding of  CBS. This logo is developed in a way that would look good in black and white and in motion, and a logo that would stay consistent. This was the first attempt at branding  

CBS Television trademark, 1951 Meggs image 20-6

CBS Television trademark, 1951

The William Caslon Broadside type specimen was the first one that was issued. It was a straightforward practical design that caslon was known for, and then made them the most popular roman style throughout the British empire in the 19th century. The kind of type that he created were not innovative, they were made to be legible and the texture of the type was made to be “comfortable” and “friendly to the eye”. He usually worked in traditional roman style typefaces that were originally made 200 years earlier. He would case, then set the type, which helped improve the printing press. He would then create and commission different newspapers, as well as design and publish books he created. 

William Caslon, Broadside Type Specimen, 1734, Public domain https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:A_Specimen_by_William_Caslon.jpg

William Caslon, Broadside Type Specimen, 1734, Public domain
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:A_Specimen_by_William_Caslon.jpg

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