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Hans Poelzig, foyer and auditorium of the Grosses Schauspielhaus (Main Theatre), 1919, Berlin (demolished)

These photos are visually striking instantly taking your breath away leaving views in a unnerving state of unease. This gives of the impression that the building would have a metal taste in the air possibly from the rock like materials and the tools use to shape them. I also think that a slight salty taste would be ever so vaguely sprites through the particles in this old styled theatre. The smell would have to be one of earthy strong smells as the use of material over time must have dampened the entire area. I instantly sense the sounds of violent but soft violins echoing through the empty seats, and chilling piano rifts that give of the sense of loneliness and elegance. It gives of the depiction of spiky and it feels very edgy with the common design along the theatre that look like big icicles on a extremely cold day. As for the movement it would most defiantly be synchronized spinning amongst the elegant, huge pillars surrounding the theatre seats. Easily recognizable as Expressionism, as it it very haunting and give off conflicting emotions of being hauntingly beautiful.

Art Deco Style

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First Image: Vintage vogue magazine cover (1920)

Second Image: Stylized Art deco Movie Poster(1989)

 

Art deco is described as angular and highly stylized, with its distinguishing features of simple, clean shapes applying emphasis on geometric shapes, as well as using cultural symbols to integrate things like popular media, cultural significance and aesthetic value.  The first picture is a stylized female figure in the art deco style which originated from the Cubism art  movement, utilizing basic shapes and mood suggesting colours art deco became increasingly popular as artist enjoyed the different possibilities allowed through this art deco style.

The first image is a depiction of early Vogue Magazine covers that often incorporated the Art Deco style, as its stylized forms grew increasingly popular as time went on. The attraction of Art Deco came through the changing world as the Art Nouveau movement introduced its intricate, stylized forms from nature and installed virtues of the hand-crafted, the Art Deco aesthetic emphasized machine-age streamlining and sleek geometry. You can see the us of line to surest background information such as the direction of light in the Vogue cover creating a sense of motion and the same can be said about the second image

 

The Art Deco style is clearly recognizable through both pieces with their slick, stealthy designs using sharp edges to create visually interesting components in their respective pieces. Their is similarity in the flat colours that illuminate the separate planes creating distinguishable shaded areas, to the backgrounds, and in the figure its self. They both use a small range of colour but the colour choice chosen express the over all feeling the artist was going for. These similarities are the influence Art Deco had in the world of media because the style allowed for anything to become visually pleasing with certain design decisions that are a main  stay components to any Art Deco inspired piece.

 

 

 

 

 

Design Inspiration: The International Style

Josef Muller Brockmann, Zurich Opera House poster, 1968
Rodo Abad, Helvetica is Art poster, 2008

The International Style, also known as Swiss Style, is a formulaic, simple and visually pleasing form of graphic design that has been used Internationally since it’s inception in 1950’s Switzerland. The goal of the Swiss Style was to create an internationally understood form of design that doesn’t leave any room for bias or misconceptions. This was a time where international trade was rising, henceforth the importance of these non-propagandist designs were more crucial than ever to be able to communicate effectively. Whether the design is asymmetrical or linear, it follows a grid. There are formulas to the process that have been perfected and are religiously followed, which are easy to distinguish in this movement.

Josef Muller Brockmann effectively communicates in the Zurich Opera House poster all of the important details about the event without any construed/distracting info. Rodo Abad, 40 years later, critiques the Swiss Style and makes basically the same poster as Brockmann, (since there is a formula to follow it is very easy to compare the two), and declares that anything written in Helvetica is art. The formula is a work of art and I have to agree with Rodo Abad, even though he is kidding. He is critiquing that the entire movement all looks the same, and that it leaves no room for creativity.

In conclusion, Rodo Abad takes inspiration from Brockmann and the entire Swiss Style movement to critique and mock the entire style for being too constructed.

 

Works cited

“http://www.printmag.com/typography/swiss-style-principles-typefaces-designers/”

“https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Typographic_Style”

“http://www.designishistory.com/home/swiss/”

 

Creative Synesthesia

“Creative Synesthesia is a condition in which one type of stimulation of the senses evokes the sensation of another.”

This perceptual phenomenon applies to Filippo Marinetti’s “At Night In Her Bed”. The father of Futurism, the goal of Marinetti’s work was to reject all that was traditional and celebrate urban culture and advanced technology. The Futurism movement wished to portray movement, speed, power and violence through a modern lens.  Marinetti’s main subjects/inspiration were the automobile and war, which represented all of these components.

In “At Night In Her Bed”, Marinetti depicts how sound would look. He has created a visual frequency of the sounds, using elongated or large type to show us a particularly higher/louder sound compared to the sounds that are smaller, which we can assume are shorter or quieter. He is showing us a bombing that is keeping a woman awake at night. It is an allegory, because she is thinking of her partner who is on the front lines fighting in the war. She is awake because she is imagining the bombings. It is total chaos, we feel the anxiety the woman is experiencing through Marinetti’s jagged lines. There is an influence from the Vorticism movement in this piece; the text is exploding upwards in a circular motion away from the woman imagining it. This piece is unique where it has already aided me visually to experience synesthesia. It’s very illustrative with the text, which brings me to interpret the sound of a bomb.

Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, At Night In Her Bed 1919

 

Works Cited:

http://www.theartstory.org/movement-futurism.htm

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/7680

https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1995.511.1/

design inspiration

 

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The images I chose to speak about are Rodchenko’s “books” advertisement and the modern day piece that took inspiration from it, the Saks on 5th advertisements for their line. The similarities between these pieces are uncanny and the fact that Saks on 5th took heavy inspiration from Rodchenko’s work is evident, from the dramatic and poignant lines to the red white and black colour pallet, even down to the use of collaged images to create a certain aesthetic that directly reflect what Alexander was doing with his posters in the 20’s and 30’s.

Alexander Rodchenko was a designer who explored many mediums but in this example he has chosen graphic design and collage, using photography and type to create an impactful image with the style known as photomontage. He was part of the Russian Constructivism movement and was greatly influenced by cubism and futurism.

Saks on 5th uses the same colours and themes as well and photomontage in their adverts however the meaning and symbolism does not come from the same place. They are emulating the propaganda of the 30’s and 40’s to make their own tongue in cheek statement about their feelings on the recession in America.

Creative Synesthesia

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Art piece: Francois Boucher, The rising of the Sun, 1753

“Synesthesia is the condition where one physical sensation evokes another; it is often described as hearing colour or tasting shapes.”

This particular piece offers a very euphoric and airy final product. It features lots of muted colours which evoke a more peaceful feeling. I find that this portrays a lot of movement. The way the clouds surround the figures makes them look very weightless and floating. They seem very effortless. This makes them feel like they’re not moving yet still somehow showing how flowy their movement is. The extending of the figure’s legs also help the eye move across the artwork creating a moving path for the eye.

Touch also plays a big role in this painting. The way that the clouds are painted make them seem very fluffy and light. It makes me think of touching cotton candy and it definitely looks like it as well. The cloths that are on the figures also follow the same technique. They look soft especially the way that they fall against the skin of the figures. The folds in them make it seem almost luscious and delicate.

The artwork as a whole portrays great movement and a sense of touch. The painting technique helps with the visual fluidity of all the elements. The placement and elongation of certain details allow for movement within the painting.