Design Inspiration

Guerilla Girls, Naked poster, 1989 vs Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Large Odalisque, 1814

 

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Large Odalisque, 1814
Guerilla Girls, Naked poster, 1989

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guerilla Girls used parody – satire to comment on the serious nature and rationale of the original – in their Naked poster, 1989, by appropriating Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres’ Large Odalisque, 1814. They clearly keep the exact pose and body of the woman in the original, but transform her into a grotesque ape. The intention is to manipulate the original as a means of revealing the ugly sexism of art and museums. The use of parody was one of the postmodern art movement’s ways of deconstructing the dominant narratives that been so prevalent in art and design up until the 1980s.

Works Cited
Eggebeen, Janna. VISD-2006: Graphic Design History. 5, Apr. 2019, Ontario College of Art and Design, Toronto. Class lecture.

Emil, Krén, and Daniel Marx. “The Grand Odalisque.” Web Gallery of Art, www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/i/ingres/05ingres.html.

Tate. “’Do Women Have To Be Naked To Get Into the Met. Museum?’, Guerrilla Girls, 1989.” Tate, www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/guerrilla-girls-do-women-have-to-be-naked-to-get-into-the-met-museum-p78793