Oreo Biscuit – An Everlasting Taste for Over A Century (1912-2012)_ Yunfangzhou Tan


Oreo Biscuit – An Everlasting Taste for Over A Century (1912-2012)

VISD2006-01 Graphic Design Hist-20th Cent 

Blog Post 1 – Design in the wild / personal obessions

By Yunfangzhou Tan (# 3166753)

 

2020, Oreo Latest Package
2020, Oreo Latest Package, Photo By Yunfangzhou Tan

 

William A. Turnier, the man who designed the Oreo cookie. (Photo courtesy of the Turnier family as published in Indyweek, Aug. 24, 2011)[4]
William A. Turnier, the man who designed the Oreo cookie. (Photo courtesy of the Turnier family as published in Indyweek, Aug. 24, 2011)[4]

 

1950, Oreo Ad Poster
1950, Oreo Ad Poster

 

1924, Oreo Ad Poster (Craft Foods)
1924, Oreo Ad Poster (Craft Foods)

 

After class as usual, I walked around the Rexall store near my home and bought a box of Oreo Double Stuf Biscuit at a discount price. I am fond of its easy-identifiable package design with a huge biscuit placing in the center of a pouring milk, inside which the product itself tastes the same. Certainly, Oreo is the most popular and best-selling cookies around the world. Its childlike ad shows how to eat and play with Oreo: “twist, lick and then drunk”. Myself, as a crazy snacks lover, find it is worthwhile to know the background history of Oreo.

 

1912, 1st Oreo Package
1912, the 1st Oreo Package

 

1915, Oreo Tin Package
1915, Oreo Tin Package

 

In 1898, there were many companies that came together to make what we now call Nabisco, which is the creator of the Oreo. It was in 1912 that they had the idea to start making a new cookie. The idea was to have two round biscuits made of chocolate flavor and filled with creme in between. The first Oreo is very alike to the one we have today only that the design on the biscuit is different.[1] The original design of the cookie featured a wreath around the edge of the cookie and the name “OREO” in the center. The name Oreo was first trademarked on March 14, 1912. In the United States, they were sold for 25 cents a pound (453 g) in novelty cans with clear glass tops, which is quite different from nowadays blue plastic packaging. The first Oreo was sold on March 6, 1912 to a grocer in Hoboken, New Jersey.[2] When the first box design in 1912 proved bulky, Oreo transitioned to this blue tin. The Oreo shows the design of cookie in its earliest days. Since then the chocolate wafer design has changed just twice.[3] The Oreo Biscuit was renamed in 1921, to “Oreo Sandwich”.[2] In 1923, Oreo cookies were available in packages, which were as opposed to boxes or tins for the first time. The package through 1940s prominently featured women enjoying Oreos and it was yellow as well. In the 1950s, Oreo started to use the see-through cellophane wrapper to package the cookies. Since then Oreo has released more than 30 different flavors worldwide, but original is still our favorite. In the 1960’s, Oreo started packaging several rows of cookies in a box. From 1975 to 1995, Oreo kept its package and changed it very little. After 1950, Oreo changed their packaging drastically, giving us the package we know today.[3]  

 

1923, Oreo Package
1923, Oreo Package

 

Changing Looks, Oreo Stamps
1912 to Today, Changing Looks of Oreo Stamps

 

1937, Oreo Package
1937, Oreo Package

 

1951, Oreo Package
1951, Oreo Package

 

1960, Oreo Package
1960, Oreo Package

 

1973, Oreo Package
1973, Oreo Package

 

1993, Oreo Package
1993, Oreo Package

 

The origin of the name Oreo is unknown, but there are many theories: including derivations from the French word ‘Or’, meaning gold (as early packaging was gold); or the Greek word ‘Oreo’, meaning beautiful, nice or well done. Others believe that the cookie was named Oreo because it was short and easy to pronounce.[2] Another fun truth of Oreo is 50 percent of Oreo eaters pull apart their cookies before they eat them and women are more likely to do the twist than men.[3] 

 

 


Works Cited 

“History of Oreos.” Oreohttp://oreofunandfacts.weebly.com/history-of-oreos.html.[1]

Smith, Ian. “Cool Photos Show the Evolution of Oreo Packaging within 100 Years! …” The Vintage News, 30 Mar. 2016, www.thevintagenews.com/2016/03/30/one-century-of-sweetness-cool-photos-show-the-evolution-of-oreo-packaging-during-the-years-2/.[2]

Russell, Mallory. “Celebrate 100 Years Of Oreo With A History Of Its Marketing.” Business Insider, Business Insider, 3 Mar. 2012, www.businessinsider.com/guess-whos-turning-100-in-style-2012-3#oreo-packaging-1915-2.[3] 

“Tag Archives: Sam Porcello.” Northern Newsjones4567.wordpress.com/tag/sam-porcello/.[4] 

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