Seoul 1988 Olympics Designs

Due to the fact that our textbook is heavily focused on Western art history, I suggest that 1988 Seoul Olympics designs and one of the main designers, Kim Hyun to be a part of the textbook to allow students a wider vision and understandings in art history.


 

The Seoul 1988 Olympics was a huge turning point in the modern history of South Korea to significantly improve international reputation. However, shortly after the “Miracle of the Han River,” which was a national economic transformation after the Korean War, the design industry was yet to be fully ready to provide enough resources. The Olympics was when South Korean designers had to face their first international stage without much of preparation.

 

Fortunately, a designer Jo Yeongje suggested the government to form an Olympics design committee and directed the entire Seoul Olympics designs from 1981 to 1988 for seven years once 1988 Olympics was confirmed. The designers who participated in the committee later applied the earned skills and knowledges to their practice, which became a huge jump in Korean design industry. It also enhanced recognition of the power of design, which later allowed designers to be a part of planning division in national projects.

 

 

Seoul 1988 Olympics Logo Logo

The logo was inspired by Korean triskelion, a triple spiral motif consisting of three symmetrical swirls from a single point, to show traditional aesthetics of South Korea in a simplistic modern style. The visual elements are harmonious over all. Bold lines are used to form a circular pattern to echo the clarity of theme.

 

 

Seoul 1988 Olympics MascotMascot

Hodori, is the official mascot of the Seoul Olympics. It’s a simplified tiger figure – the national animal – wearing the logo on his neck, with a traditional hat that is used for a traditional dance on his head. The stylistic choice of the character was to portray the hospitable traditions of Korea in a friendly tone.

 

 

Seoul 1988 Olympics Poste

Poster

20th century Olympics posters were the essence of the contemporary design techniques. Though it was once centered in North America and Europe, starting with 1956 Melbourne Olympics, Olympics designs expanded its diversity adapting regional characteristics and aesthetics. The official poster is an image of a torch runner with diffusing light rays from the Olympics symbol above him.

Seoul 1988 Olympics utilized computer graphics which was considered innovative at that time. Due to technical issues, it was produced as a team unlike these days where most of the graphic work can be done by a single designer. The gradation of the rings were done by Cho Jonghyun , while the glowing rays were done by a Japanese designer, Kenda Etsuo. The torch runner was photographed by Hyungu Yu.

 

Designer, Kim Hyun

Seoul 1988 Olympics Mascot SketchSeoul 1988 Olympics sketch

“To me, design is a process of self-identification.”

Kim Hyum was born in Seoul, 1949. He designed Seoul Olympics mascot in 1988, then designed Daejeon Expo mascot in 1991. He founded a design company in 1984, later creating logos for LG, GS, BC card, and the Korean Constitutional court.

He won the design competition of the Seoul Olympics mascot Hodori, eventually became one of the most important figures in Korean design industry. Hodori was thoroughly supported by the government and was loved by the citizens. A variety of goods were produced including cartoons, animation and even a bank plan named after the mascot.

Seoul Olympics Committee opened a public competition for a national symbol to design the mascot. Few of the national preferences included magpie, Korean Jindo dog, and rabbit but the final winner was Siberian tiger that is more suitable to illustrate dynamic movements with.

Hodori is a simplified Siberian tiger character, designed after the official national animal. The curved outlines deliver delicacy, and the Olympics medal on its neck represents its identity as a mascot. Based in the original version, designers created 7 different traditions versions and 19 different Korean alphabets versions which have supported to inform the international audience about the nation.

As a side story, the final competitors were Siberian tiger and rabbit. Though the Olympics committee secretly wanted rabbit to be selected since the international reputation over Korean government was very centered on the fact that it was a military government, which the docility of rabbits can offset. However, tiger was chosen in 1982 by the government officials.

 

Sources

Esquire. “김현은 누구인가: 에스콰이어 코리아 (Esquire Korea).” ESQUIREKOREA, Esquire, 15 May 2018, www.esquirekorea.co.kr/article/36236.

Segye Wa Hamkke Nanun Hanguk Munhwa: Sangong Kang Sin-Pyo Ollimpik Munhwa Haksul Undong = Korean Culture and Seoul Olympic Studies: Kang, Shin-Pyo: His Olympic Movement. Kungnip Minsok Pangmulgwan, 2010.

디자인 월간. “디자인 40년 회고전 연, 김현.” DESIGN, 25 Jan. 2010, mdesign.designhouse.co.kr/article/article_view/103/50758?per_page=76&sch_txt=.

 

 

Ramona Andra Xavier / Vaporwave

For the next edition of Graphic Design: A New History, I propose that an area of graphic design be dedicated to the subculture music genre Vaporwave and also highlighting an artist named Ramona Andra Xavier who contributed to creating and popularizing the music and visual trend. The Oregon graphic artist and producer’s first album was called, “Floral Shoppe” (2011) and it heavily sampled on elevator muzak and smooth jazz reminiscent of music that would be heard in old shopping malls.

macintoshplus_floralshoppe_cover

Floral Shoppe by Macintosh Plus, 2011 (one of Ramona Andra Xavier’s many aliases)

Much of the music genre and its producers continued to follow up from the previous genre of “chillwave”, using trance-like synth-based elevator music that was usually never taking itself too seriously. The graphics that would display this genre were nothing short of a parody of 80s pop music, often referred to as meme music. (Mikhaylova) Also often distributed on free websites such as Soundcloud and Bandcamp as its intention was for easy listening background music. The music and appeal were in the subculture were also in the attention to detail in the graphic art for album covers. Usually using 80s and 90s technology, glitch art and Japanese aesthetic for nostalgic appeal. The art heavily used renaissance-era statues and cyberpunk imagery, and the Japanese language as an appropriative aesthetic choice. To have statuesque figures next to computer graphics challenges the viewer to think: what is art? In this context but sets the tone of the genre as a whole. 

Xavier and anonymous vaporwave contributors present these visual parodies of what they believe blissful nostalgia looked like within the early 2010s, using visual references that would become key signifiers of the genre such as Arizona ice tea, palm trees, old VHS tapes and fuji bottled water became a humourous staple of the genres playing on the aesthetic of consumerist culture. (esquire) 

 

music_vektroid_4451Vektroid Art

38ac8153703edc564b9602cc4e3603f4MTV International 2015 TV Rebranding

Later on, MTV would adopt the years old visual trend to look refreshing and new. Claiming its self-awareness to the generation’s movement toward self-examination, identity politics and apparent narcissism. (Nguyen) Perhaps many saw this as the death to vaporwave during 2013 as the visuals began to echo in Drake’s video “Hotline Bling” and other musically popular ventures, it began to become mainstream.

Ultimately, its purpose of engaging with listeners is to enjoy the music and art as a reaction against the irony and nihilism of postmodernism. (Jurgens) Vaporwave is innovative and unique as a subculture of trying to create sincere and joyful renditions of forgotten corporate videos and advertisements into soulful manipulations. This genre becomes relevant for a “failed consumer paradise” where we will often see economic and cultural decline cycle once again. (esquire)

Music critic Adam Harper described vaporwave artists’ work as a reaction to late capitalism thusly: “These musicians can be read as sarcastic anti-capitalists revealing the lies and slippages of modern techno-culture and its representations, or as its willing facilitators, shivering with delight upon each new wave of delicious sound.” (Pearson)

 

Bibliography:

“How Vaporwave Was Created Then Destroyed by the Internet.” Esquire, 11 Oct. 2017, www.esquire.com/entertainment/music/a47793/what-happened-to-vaporwave/.

Evans, Sidney, et al. “I Am My MTV: MTV Gets Personal With The Viewer In Its Rebrand.” Brandingmag, Brandingmag | Narrating the Discussion, 8 May 2019, www.brandingmag.com/2015/06/26/i-am-my-mtv-mtv-gets-personal-with-the-viewer-in-its-rebrand/.

Jurgens, Genista. “Why Won’t Vaporwave Die?” Format, www.format.com/magazine/features/art/vaporwave.

Lyons, Patrick. “Vaporwave Pioneer Vektroid Can Do So Much More Than Music.” Willamette Week, www.wweek.com/music/2018/10/18/vaporwave-pioneer-vektroid-can-do-so-much-more-than-music/.

Pearson, Jordan. “How Tumblr and MTV Killed the Neon Anti-Corporate Aesthetic of Vaporwave.” Vice, 26 June 2015, www.vice.com/en_us/article/539v9a/tumblr-and-mtv-killed-vaporwave.

Scaruffi, Piero. A History of Chillwave and Vaporwave, www.scaruffi.com/history/vaporwav.html.

 

 

Blog Post 2: Contemporary Graphic Design

Eugene Yang

#3160515

 

Graphic Design A New History, written by Stephen J. Eskilson covers the history of graphic design, from the expansion of graphic design in the 19th century to contemporary graphic design. In the preface of this book, Eskilson addresses the significance of digital technology:

“This book emerged in the context of the radical changes that have revolutionized graphic design over the last few years. Digital technology, which had already substantially influenced the field for two decades has transformed the way in which many designers conceive of and execute their work” (Eskilson, 10). 

Even though Eskilson talks about digital technology and the development of it, and there are parts that this book introduces contemporary(digital) graphic design around the 90s and 2000s, I personally find the content for these chapters are little informationally lacking compared to the other parts of the graphic design history (understandable since the book was published in early 2010s). We live in an era where smartphones and internet, social media are part of our lives. Due to these enhancements of digital technology, the trend and the technology used for graphic design nowadays has a wide variety, and is changing quite quickly and radically. Therefore I believe that the history of graphic design development in the past 10 years is just as important as the history of the past graphic design development.

There is a part that introduces digital graphic design trends in this book, but I thought that it could address more various types of trends and styles by introducing new, active, and relevant graphic designers and designs and at this moment. For example:

 

  • David McLeod, 3D Typography

 

David McLeod, Metro AR-T: New York City, 2014
David McLeod, Metro AR-T: New York City, 2014

According to his Behance page, he is “a 3D Illustrator and Artist. Originally from Australia, he now lives and works in New York City. His work is focused on experimental and textural CGI illustration, bespoke typography and lettering”.

 

 

  • Isometric Design, Jing Zhang
Jing Zhang, Slack Illustration, 2019
Jing Zhang, Slack Illustration, 2019

Isometric design is “a method of drawing/creating a three-dimensional object in two dimensions”, quoting from Isometric Design & Illustration: An Eye- Catching Trend, by Carrie Cousins.

According to her website page, Jing Zhang is: “Originally from mainland China, Jing is an illustrator living in England, the epicentre of eccentricity and creativity.With her clients mostly from the advertising industry, she has been working for clients including the European Parliament, General Electric, HSBC, IBM, Canon, Samsung, Adobe and many others”

In conclusion, these artists I mentioned above are active and have worked with major companies such as Adobe, Toyota, Canon and more. They could be a good example to show the development of tools and programs used for graphic design. Also could portray the history of trending styles of graphic design past few years, and may help filling more missing information on contemporary graphic design in Graphic Design A New History. 

 

 

 

 


Works Cited

Eskilson, Stephen J. Graphic Design: a New History. Yale University Press, 2012.

Behance. “David McLeod on Behance.” Behance, www.behance.net/davidmcleod.

Cousins, Carrie. “Isometric Design & Illustration: An Eye-Catching Trend.” Design Shack, Design Shack, 5 June 2019, designshack.net/articles/trends/isometric-design-illustration/.

“About & Contact.” Jing Zhang Illustration, www.mazakii.com/About-Contact.

 

 

Takashi Murakami – Esther Wong

Takashi Murakami
Takashi Murakami

Takashi Murakami is a Japanese contemporary artist born in 1962, founder of Kaikai Kiki Co. Ltd., works in both fine arts media and commercial media. He is one of the most innovative and influential  Japanese artists today, known for merging traditional Japanese art styles with Western art influences, cultures that are frequently considered in opposition, and blurring the boundaries between fine art and commercial art.

Murakami received his  BA, MFA, and PhD from Tokyo University of the Arts, his PhD in nihonga painting became the basis of his artwork. His huge interest in manga and animation ⏤ the Otaku subculture, was the inspiration of his aesthetic sense. He created the term “Superflat”, which he described as a concept he came up with “by overlaying the painting style of creating a completely flat surface with the cultural predicament of post-war Japan.” This term explains the background and production of his art, also became a postmodern movement. In 2000 Murakami curated an exhibition titled Superflat, which featured works by artists whose techniques and mediums incorporate different aspects of Japanese visual culture, from ukiyo-e to anime and kawaii (Japanese cute culture). He advanced and introduced his Superflat theory with this exhibition, highlighting the absence of perspective, the two-dimensionality in Japanese visual culture, from traditional art to contemporary subcultures in the context of post-war Japan, transported the tough realities⏤horrors of World War II and its aftermath into the realm of cartoon fantasy. Painful truths were stripped of their historical context in childlike animated forms, which reflects the flattening process, and Murakami’s feelings of cynicism towards the influx of consumerism and embrace of western culture, caused by the success of Japan’s conquerors, defiling Japan’s honour. The Japanese society had lost its part of identity, aspects of its culture and its complexity; thus becoming flat and superficial. Murakami’s Superflat movement encouraged Japanese artists to mock the Japanese consumerism and remind the country the importance of its individuality. He inspired artists to combine elements of American pop art and Okatu culture, it was a beneficial way to express their feelings and views.

Murakami successfully created a style of his own. His style is instantly recognizable from his anime-esque aesthetic. Using flat/glossy surfaces, incorporating motifs from Japanese traditional art and pop art culture, Otaku imagery and candy-like colours. He extends his work to mass-produced items, including prints, sculptures, animated videos, limited edition dolls, t-shirts, chocolates, gum, keychains, etc. all manufactured from Kaikai Kiki, his own factory.

Murakami not only expands on integrating fine art and pop culture into one flat plane, he is able to appropriate contemporary globalized visual culture, and explored the new possibilities of manufacturing to create a incorporate commercial, popular images into well-executed pieces of fine art, thus he is considered the heir to Warhol.  His art also defines traditional Japanese identity from modernity, allows us to learn about Japanese history.

 

Work Cited

Lubow, Arthur. “The Murakami Method.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 3 Apr. 2005, www.nytimes.com/2005/04/03/magazine/the-murakami-method.html.

Murakami, Takashi. “Manga, Goya and ‘Star Wars’: The Unexpected Influences That Made Takashi Murakami the Artist He Is Today.” CNN, Cable News Network, 29 July 2019, www.cnn.com/style/article/takashi-murakami-identity/index.html.

“Superflat: The Aesthetic Reaction to Post-War Japan.” The Artifice, the-artifice.com/superflat-japan/.

“Takashi MURAKAMI – Artist.” Perrotin, www.perrotin.com/artists/Takashi_Murakami/12#biography.

“Takashi Murakami – Bio: The Broad.” Bio | The Broad, www.thebroad.org/art/takashi-murakami.

“Takashi Murakami.” Gagosian, 12 Apr. 2018, gagosian.com/artists/takashi-murakami/.

 

 

 

representation of cultural arts

I personally believe it would be very helpful and informative to see more cultural and traditional pieces within our history textbooks for many are inadequately represented not gaining the recognition that is deserved. As all the art textbooks that I have come across do give a thorough understanding of worldwide arts and design nonetheless it is heavily comprised of the European arts. Yes, artists who are interested in doing further research on specific styles of art that they find are interesting are able to do so to further educate themselves. However, it is very unfortunate to see how brief and concise many cultural styles of art are being represented within our very own textbooks. From my own experiences growing up, I felt art had to be very eurocentric or westernized to be celebrated and accepted because I was only surrounded by what was shown in our textbooks and a part of the art history curriculum. But over the years it has been very interesting to see the representation of different cultures and ethnic backgrounds outside of textbooks. The recent recognition and celebration of our differences helping to inform one another of our cultures, values, and traditions to create a deeper understanding of one other.

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2b2b03db37a80923242c897e8a51a940

As an artist who is ethnically Korean, there has recently been an influx in attraction to the Korean culture through the numerous achievements that have been made throughout the years attracting many to the different sectors of what makes up Korean life and culture it is definitely lacking in the arts. As the visual and fine arts are nearly represented as much as the music, dance, and entertainment section. 

20180301-114004-collage1fb4

There is such a richness in the traditional arts such as folk painting, calligraphy, mulberry paper (Hanji), and etc. Though Korean, Chinese, and Japanese art all share similar concepts, motifs, techniques, and forms as time has passed to each their own have developed into their own distinct styles.  As an example, not many know of the traditional Korean masks called 탈 (Tal) that are made of wood with a black cloth attached to the sides to mimic that of hair as the mask bearer has information about themselves revealed through the mask itself. When first looked upon they are not very appealing, almost grotesque and unappealing looking due to the saturated use of colours with exaggerated facial features. These masks are painted in primary colours to represent an individual’s personality and social class, and gender. 

smile-korean-traditional-male-female-mask

various-korean-traditional-masks

andong-mask-festival-15

Works cited

  • “Korea Information – Culture and the Arts.” Korean Cultural Center New York, www.koreanculture.org/korea-information-culture-and-the-arts.
  • Panero, James, et al. “Korean Culture Is on the Rise. What About Korean Art?” National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), www.neh.gov/humanities/2014/julyaugust/feature/korean-culture-the-rise-what-about-korean-art.
  • team, travel360.com editorial. “South Korea: Mask Unmasked.” Travel360.Com, 1 Sept. 2019, www.travel360.com/south-korea-mask-unmasked/.

 

New Form of Graphic Design: Song Visualizers

Written by Steph Burns (3167495)

Within graphic design education and the history courses I’ve taken within the subject I’ve noticed how little video or motion graphics are discussed. Perhaps it’s because video technologies haven’t been around a long time if you take the entire history of art into account; for the most part the job of a graphic designer didn’t include motion or video for a very long time. As a result of this, I often think of graphic design as stagnant, when in actuality it can have many moving parts. I think in general, it would be wise to include more motion design within the history of graphic design as I am seeing a lot more use of motion or video graphics in the present day. Especially with the over saturation of our current digital world, motion is almost like the new way to attract attention to an object or thing that didn’t previously have it; often times motion or video elements will be implemented to draw attention to a piece.

Moreover, very recently, I have noticed a new form of motion video that has started to become popular with music artists. I think it’s worth mentioning, as it is a new way in which graphic design is starting to be used.  I’ve seen a fair amount of short video or motion clips that act as a “visualizer” for songs. I’ve seen some uploaded on YouTube, but for the most part I’ve seen this start to occur over the last few months on Spotify, which is the main way I listen to music. I’ve included examples of these below, but these video or motion clips appear as you play the song. It’s much too short to be a music video, but rather a short 5 to 10 second looping video that plays while the song is. You can’t view Spotify horizontally, only vertically, so these clips are made to the dimensions of the typical phone screen with the intention that it will loop play and add to the experience of listing to a song. There are many different types of these that I’ve seen, some are short videos, while others are cinemagraphs, but regardless, they all have the same purpose.  It’s also important to note that a large majority of people won’t view or have access to these short clips. They’ll only be available to the select people that have access to the internet and have access to a cellphone with a Spotify account.

Music visualizer for Dua Lipa's song Future Nostalgia, 2020 (screenshotted by me on Spodify)
Music visualizer for Dua Lipa’s song Future Nostalgia, 2020 (screenshotted by me on Spodify)

One of the first times I ever saw this mode of presenting songs was with Billie Eilish’s debut album, When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? Throughout the entire album, for every one of the 14 songs, there is a short looping video that goes along with. Some of these clips relate to the lyrics or central theme of the song while others only add an ambiance. The very last song, which features lyrics from the previous 13 songs also has the visualizer for it take clips or parts of the previous 13 visualizers.

It’s also interesting to note that these visualizers are being made for albums that didn’t originally have them. Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp a Butterfly was released in 2015, but these clips (screenshots shown below,) have been made recently to add a visual experience when you listen to that album now, that wasn’t available before.

music visualizer
Music visualizer for Kendrick Lamar’s song Wesley’s Theory, 2019/2020 (screenshotted by me on Spodify) 
Music visualizer for Kendrick Lamar's song Alright, 2019/2020 (screenshotted by me on Spodify)
Music visualizer for Kendrick Lamar’s song Alright, 2019/2020 (screenshotted by me on Spodify)

Blog 2

 

 

 

I believe that there should be more graffiti art included within our textbooks. This style of art is a great example of the type of art that is being more popularized in this generation, and therefore be studied more in-depth. Graffiti can be found all over the world and expresses the social perspectives of those who live within the community. Often times it is seen as vandalism because it is usually done without the permission of the owners of the property. Contemporary graffiti is also described by its controversial issues between social, style and aesthetic forms. (Colombini & Alain 2018). Many see graffiti as a distraction or negative addition to communities that face poverty or have a lot of violence with the community. It also is under the assumption that Graffiti is a positive urban art form that raises some paradoxical questions regarding ephemerality and “visual pollution” with a growing art market demand. (Colombini & Alain 2018). Depending on the content, Graffiti and Street Art have their own definitions and interpretations. (Colombini & Alain 2018). It is important to understand the history behind these artworks because it tells the stories of what goes on behind closed doors within the communities. It is important that we are taught to analyze these types of art just like we are taught to analyze designers and painters from the previous centuries. Studying these works of the area will enlighten how are communities are and responding to certain events or downfalls and how we choose to express this.

More artists like Shepard Fairey should be put into our textbook because many artists from this era are inspired by graffiti and pop art. Street art reflects where many of these aspiring artists come from. It reflects diversity and freedom for those who as if they have no voice. Graffiti art is a way to express social issues or make a political statement peacefully. Often, graffiti makes a normal and dull place more interesting and brighter, bringing beauty to places that are run down or facing poverty. (Journey, 2018). It also brings a sense of community to bring together a connection amongst people. it is a way of energizing a community rather then it becoming destroyed. (Journey, 2018). Lastly, street art is another way of telling history. Many artists create murals when the community has experienced a triumph or tragedy. It away for the community to come together and celebrate, or for memory to never fade. This type of art allows people to explore cities, and places they’ve never thought to go to and experience the community differently, almost like walking into a gallery. Not only does it bring beauty, excitement, and mystery to the world, but it also brings happiness

 

opct_bbf939c05933783e2eceee7ecfc862b4ed1c8f52 5e2ffe975bc79c10c30e74da hope-bo

Works cited

journey, Author janaline’s world. “Top 5 Reasons Why Street Art Is Important.” Janaline’s World Journey, 25 Feb. 2018, janalinesworldjourney.com/2018/02/25/reasons-why-street-art-is-important/.

 

“10 Reasons to LOVE Street Art.” Graffiti Artist & Street Artists for Hire by the Graffiti Kings, 19 Aug. 2016, graffitikings.co.uk/10-reasons-love-street-art/.

 

Colombini, and Alain. “The Duality of Graffiti: Is It Vandalism or Art?” CeROArt. Conservation, Exposition, Restauration D’Objets D’Art, Association CeROArt Asbl, 2 Dec. 2018, journals.openedition.org/ceroart/5745.

 

 

MINGDE_SHAO_3162710

Mingde Shao

3162710

VISD-2006-001

Keith Bresnahan

April 6, 2020

 

Kenya Hara

Kenya Hara is one of the most famous Japanese designers in the world. I believe the next edition of Graphic Design should include him: A New History for several reasons:

Hara has enormous effects on modern design history in Japan. Before the 1970s, the design of Japan is sometimes copying American and European styles. Gradually Japanese designers came up with their style. Hara was one of the designers who breathe new life into Japanese design. He graduated in design from the Musashino Art University of Kodaira in 1983, and immediately joined the NDC. (Munari,2013) Minimalist designs by Kenya Hara are elegant and straightforward, which shows eastern style. Therefore Hara’s design is popular around the world, especially among young people.

Hara’s new idea of design can help to create a complete history of graphic design. He believes that design is based on our life. The original intention of the design is to create a better experience. As a minimalist designer, he thinks that “空 ” is the idea of design, because “空” can become everything. “空” means “empty.” He also suggests to use senses is the best way to determine designs. The zen from his understanding of design is something new from the history of graphic design. Therefore he shows to be included for a complete history.

gdpic(Hara,2018)

To be edit into the textbook and introduce him to readers, I think the logo of Aranya company as one of his famous works should be added to our textbook as well. Aranya is a resort in Hebei China, which aims to build a cozy integrated community. Hara uses the most basic letters to show a clear view and feel of the brand. The lower case letters look comfortable, soft, and beautiful. People will feel peaceful from this logo. Hara wants his design to be like water, which is clean and pure, so audience and get the nature of the context through the designs. That’s what Aranya company wants to show the audience. In this case, I believe the logo design of Aranya would be the best option to be a sample in the textbook.

Overall, Kenya Hara has his understanding of design, and his ideas are pure and mostly based on our life. His concept has a significant effect on Japanese design history. I think we should include him in the next version of the textbook.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work Cited

“HARA DESIGN INSTITUTE.” Aranya | WORKS | HARA DESIGN INSTITUTE, www.ndc.co.jp/hara/en/works/2018/04/aranya.html.

 

Mingde Shao
3162710
VISD-2006-001
Keith Bresnahan
April 6, 2020

Kenya Hara
Kenya Hara is one of the most famous Japanese designers in the world. I believe the next edition of Graphic Design should include him: A New History for several reasons:
Hara has enormous effects on modern design history in Japan. Before the 1970s, the design of Japan is sometimes copying American and European styles. Gradually Japanese designers came up with their style. Hara was one of the designers who breathe new life into Japanese design. He graduated in design from the Musashino Art University of Kodaira in 1983, and immediately joined the NDC.(Munari,2013) Minimalist designs by Kenya Hara are elegant and straightforward, which shows eastern style. Therefore Hara’s design is popular around the world, especially among young people.
Hara’s new idea of design can help to create a complete history of graphic design. He believes that design is based on our life. The original intention of the design is to create a better experience. As a minimalist designer, he thinks that “空 ” is the idea of design, because “空” can become everything. “空” means “empty.” He also suggests to use senses is the best way to determine designs. The zen from his understanding of design is something new from the history of graphic design. Therefore he shows to be included for a complete history.
(Hara,2018)
To be edit into the textbook and introduce him to readers, I think the logo of Aranya company as one of his famous works should be added to our textbook as well. Aranya is a resort in Hebei China, which aims to build a cozy integrated community. Hara uses the most basic letters to show a clear view and feel of the brand. The lower case letters look comfortable, soft, and beautiful. People will feel peaceful from this logo. Hara wants his design to be like water, which is clean and pure, so audience and get the nature of the context through the designs. That’s what Aranya company wants to show the audience. In this case, I believe the logo design of Aranya would be the best option to be a sample in the textbook.
Overall, Kenya Hara has his understanding of design, and his ideas are pure and mostly based on our life. His concept has a significant effect on Japanese design history. I think we should include him in the next version of the textbook.

Work Cited
“HARA DESIGN INSTITUTE.” Aranya | WORKS | HARA DESIGN INSTITUTE, www.ndc.co.jp/hara/en/works/2018/04/aranya.html.

GMIConference. “A Talk with Kenya Hara: Nothing, yet Everything”, Youtube, May 23th 2017, px4vx0hFImQ, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=px4vx0hFImQ

Nicola-Matteo, Munari “Kenya Hara
Okayama, Japan, 1958.” Designculture, 2013,http://www.designculture.it/interview/kenya-hara.html

Youtube, May 23th 2017, px4vx0hFImQ, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=px4vx0hFImQ

 

Nicola-Matteo, Munari “Kenya Hara

Okayama, Japan, 1958.” Designculture, 2013,http://www.designculture.it/interview/kenya-hara.html

 

 

Why Pauline Boutal deserves to be in the next edition of Graphic Design: A New History

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Facteur, U.S. Postal Service [Postman, U.S. Postal Service], 1909. Pauline Boutal painted this scene at the age of fifteen.The narrative scene is typical of calendar illustrations of the time, like those of the Hudson’s Bay Company.

     Included in the textbook are a few artists who in their practice, worked strictly with paint. A majority appear in Chapter 4 – Modern Art, Modern Graphic Design and acknowledge painters such as Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Umberto Boccioni and Amédée Ozenfant. All of which are artists whom participated in art movements such as Cubism, Futurism and Abstract Expressionism. The artist who I personally believe would be a strong addition to the next publication of Stephen F. Eskilson’s – Graphic Design A New History, is Pauline Boutal.

     Pauline Boutal (1894-1992) was both a French and Canadian artist who began her art journey after being constantly encouraged by her husband, Arthur Boutal. He admired her talent and wanted her to devote more of her time to art. At this time, money was hard to come by but he insisted on paying “five dollars for the registration fee at the Winnipeg Art Club” where this was her initial start of attending drawing classes (Duguay 2015). Above, is one of the many paintings she had completed at the age of fifteen while still attending the art sessions at the Winnipeg Art Club. As she grew older, she decided that Arthur Boutal was the one she wanted to marry.

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Eaton’s Catalogue, Spring & Summer, 1925.
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L’abonné fidèle, 1940. This pastel portrait of A. Sourisseau was displayed in the Manitoba Society of Artists exhibition under the title Wine, Snuff and Politics.

Pauline Boutal was always working to improve her artwork. She was very much interested in fashion design and often drew from imagination. She was given the opportunity to illustrate for several Eaton’s catalogues and “worked alongside many artists of varied talents, such as Fritz Brandtner, Eric Bergman, and Charles Comfort” (Duguay 2015). While working for these catalogues, the quality of her lines and strokes were developing the more she drew. At the peak of her artistic journey, a handful of theatre productions began reaching out to Pauline Boutal and always kept her busy with graphic design commissions. The point is, at the age of fifteen, creating art was simply a hobby of hers but years of dedication and improving her skills allowed her as well as her artwork reach new heights. She worked with all sorts of mediums from inks to pastels and despite the heavy workload that both her husband and herself accumulated, “they wouldn’t have done it if they hadn’t loved it” (Duguay 2015). As a Canadian young artist myself, it is certain that many others can learn from Pauline Boutal’s story and begin to understand the amount of commitment it takes to make art while also enjoying the process to the fullest.


Works Cited:

Duguay, Louise, and S. E. Stewart. Pauline Boutal: An Artist’s Destiny,
1894-
 1992. University of Manitoba Press, 2015.

Blog Post 2 Olaoluwa Oyenuga

An area of graphic design I would like to see in the next edition of Graphic Design: A New History would be a section discussing the contributions of modern social media ephemera and its relationship over time to the practice of graphic design.
With the introduction of a myriad of social media platforms also came a new forum for creating and sharing many types of ephemera online, ranging from adverts, event promotions, viral videos and memes, to religious propaganda and various translations and adaptations of news media. Many of these platforms emphasize content creation encouraging users to create eye-catching content in order to secure the attention of their viewers/followers. Because of the intensely visual nature of social media, the compound result of this new media environment is a “deprivatization” of graphic design.
Many regular social media users without any formal education in visual design are creating (and at times, in various ways, even critiquing) design solutions to suit their online needs. In the earliest periods of this development, most online ephemera were quite crude in their design and people rarely created such ephemera themselves, rather most were simply re-posted severally so that the original author became practically untraceable (think family WhatsApp group chats or those reshared Facebook posts) – with the exception of advertisements created by actual brands, organizations and companies. These designs often used basic or non-existent structure, decorative typefaces and/or jarring combinations of typefaces, colors, and graphics (Many of these ephemera have evolved to become what we recognize as the modern meme). However, what these ephemera often lacked in their aesthetic, they made up for in their loud and direct message.

Figure 1 Author unknown, Date unknown; A generic re-shared social media post.

With time more users have begun to create their own content, especially with the advent of more truly “ephemeral” platforms and features such as Snapchat and Instagram stories. These apps/features allow users to create content that is deleted 24-hours after sharing, unlike regular profile posts which stay visible indefinitely unless hidden/deleted. The Instagram story feature especially has significantly developed since its introduction, adding more tools and features to allow users to be more creative and to make unique designs by combining any of the in-app features. As a result of these new forms of social media it seems lay people are developing a more refined sensibility for visual communication and graphic design; users are becoming increasingly selective with how they use in-app and out-of-app design tools to create aesthetically pleasing and unique designs to express themselves online. As a result, these designs (while typically quite personal in content and audience) are becoming more refined in their structure and even levels of meaning, taking cues from pop-culture and even psychology.

Figure 2  Lexie Carbone, 2019; Instagram stories often have a collage or scrapbook aesthetic as a result of the constraints of the feature (and possibly also the point of stories), especially when created in-app.

The evolution of social media ephemera is even beginning to have an effect on how companies advertise both within these apps and on other platforms, and I believe it can be argued that the trends of social media ephemera are having an effect on the professional practice of graphic design. This is a relationship that can be explored, however briefly, within a new edition of the textbook. Within the social media sphere, there appears to be a microcosm of graphic design development. While this may be perceived an insignificant phenomenon, we know that historically graphic design has been shaped repeatedly by changing popular trends among its consumers, therefore I believe this area is evolving to be a strong influence in the development of modern graphic design, and one that should be addressed and studied by design institutions and likewise within a major textbook like Graphic Design: A New History.