Born to Break the Barriers – KASHIWA SATO and His Cross-border Design_ by Yunfangzhou Tan (Blog Post 2)

 


Born to Break the Barriers – KASHIWA SATO and His Cross-border Design

 

VISD2006-01 Graphic Design Hist-20th Cent 

Blog Post 2 – Who or what is missing from our textbook?

By Yunfangzhou Tan (# 3166753)

 

I clearly remember, last summer, while I was walking on the busy, crowded streets in Tokyo on my own, buildings in neon flesh lights mixed with traffic lights were everywhere around me. The convenient stores and clothes shops can be seen frequently on the streets in Japan. Remarkably, UNIQLO and 7-11 (Seven-Eleven) are respectively the world wide brands of groceries and casual wear in Japan, where places designed for young people. Customers usually recognize the logos or the icons of these kinds of stores and then walk in. So as the highly-recognizable icons of UNIQLO and 7-11 that are designed by Kashiwa Sato.

 

UNIQLO Logo
UNIQLO Logo, 2006.

 

 

7-11 Logo
7-11 (Seven-Eleven) Logo Rebranded, 2010.

 

Who is KASHIWA SATO? “Born in Tokyo in 1965. Graduated from the Department of Graphic Design, Faculty of Art and Design of Tama Art University. Spent 11 years at Hakuhodo and established his own creative studio, SAMURAI, in Japan in 2000. Kashiwa Sato, one of the world’s leading creative directors, delivers a fresh perspective of design to the world. From concept and communication strategy building to developing brand logos, Kashiwa’s ability as a brand architect to identity, elucidate, and visualize the essence of the subject is highly acclaimed in number of fields” (KASHIWA SATO – CREATIVE DIRECTOR).[1] “In a globalized market awash in digital information, Sato has honed an approach he calls ‘iconic branding.’ The idea is to identify a core message and design an icon-a potent anchor image or symbol-to convey that message succinctly and instantaneously across linguistic and cultural barriers” (Yumi, “Creative Director Satō Kashiwa: An Eye for the Iconic”).[5]

 

Kashiwa Sato Himself
KASHIWA SATO Himself.

 

“Logos can function as icons, of course, but so can products, buildings, and even architectural spaces. So, what makes any of these things an icon?” (Yumi, “Creative Director Satō Kashiwa: An Eye for the Iconic”).[5]

 

Kashiwa Sato took charge of all global branding communication activities for UNIQLO, a global leading fashion brand from Tokyo, starting with the opening of the flagship store in 2006, ‘UNIQLO SOHO NEW YORK.’ to realize the unique creative and design foundation of UNIQLO, he established the core brand” (KASHIWA SATO – CREATIVE DIRECTOR)[1]like GAP and H&M were making big gains globally” (Yumi, “Creative Director Satō Kashiwa: An Eye for the Iconic”).[5]

 

UNIQLO Design 1
UNIQLO Design 1, 2006.

 

UNIQLO Design 2
UNIQLO Design 2, 2006.

 

UNIQLO Design 3
UNIQLO Design 3, 2006.

 

UNIQLO Shopping Bag Sample
UNIQLO Shopping Bag Sample, 2006.

 

UNIQLO Poster Ad
UNIQLO Poster Ad., 2006.

 

UNIQULO World Wide
UNIQLO World Wide, 2006.

 

UNIQLO In Shanghai
UNIQLO In Shanghai 1.

 

UNIQLO In Shanghai 2
UNIQLO In Shanghai 2.

 

UNIQLO in NY
UNIQLO In NY, 2006.

 

UNIQLO in Paris
UNIQLO In Paris, 2006.

 

“In Sato’s minimalist approach to complex ideas, he draws inspiration from Japanese culture and traditions. When the head of UNIQLO asked him to design a logo for the business, Sato chose red and white, which he said instantly identifies UNIQLO as Japanese because it is reminiscent of the country’s flag” (Horn, “’A Strong Identity Is an Icon’ Says the Designer behind the Uniqlo Logo”). [2] “He then felt intuitively that katakana characters would work best as the key visual. He was after a kind of ‘exquisite intuitively’ that would elicit a double take from Japanese and foreign consumers alike. The fact that it ended up working just as envisioned on busy streets in cities around the world gave Sato confidence a boost. It proved that you could control a brand’s image very precisely through visual signals like font and color. For him, that experience was a powerful demonstration of the power of icons” (Yumi, “Creative Director Satō Kashiwa: An Eye for the Iconic”).[5] “‘super rationality with aesthetic consciousness,’ which summarizes UNIQLO’s value proposition to the world: high-quality products at affordable prices” (Williams, “Kashiwa Sato: Branding Is Limited by Tradition & Common Sense”). [4]

 

UT (T-shirt) Logo Of UNIQLO.
UT(T-shirt) Logo Of UNIQLO, 2006.

 

UNIQLO Products (Pantiess)
UNIQLO UT(T-shirt) Cans Packages, 2006.

 

UNIQLO Shop 1
UNIQLO UT(T-shirt) Store 1, 2006.

 

UNIQLO Shop 2
UNIQLO Store 2, 2006.

 

UNIQLO Shop 3
UNIQLO Store 3, 2006.

 

“It has been 40 years since 7-11 (Seven-Eleven) Japan was established. Kashiwa Sato built a design strategy with a focus on its private brand for the purpose of re-branding this global convenience store chain in 2010. Kashiwa repositioned Seven-Eleven Japan’s private brand, which was in its third year, not by the position of private” (KASHIWA SATO – CREATIVE DIRECTOR).[1]It’s the same approach he’s used for other high-profile clients like UNIQLO and NTT Docomo but the essence is to identify a core message and then design an icon that conveys that message across barriers” (Johnny, “Kashiwa Sato’s Rebranding for 7-Eleven Japan”).[3]

 

7-11 Porducts Overview
7-11 Rebranded Products Design Overview, 2010.

 

7-11 Porduct Packages (Sandwich)
7-11 Rebranded Product Packages (Sandwich), 2010.

 

7-11 Porduct Packages (Snacks)
7-11 Rebranded Product Packages (Snacks), 2010.

 

7-11 Porduct Packages (Drinks)
7-11 Rebranded Product Packages (Drinks), 2010.

 

7-11 Porduct Packages (Nuts)
7-11 Rebranded Product Packages (Nuts), 2010.

 

7-11 Porduct Packages (Salty Fish Onigiri)
7-11 Rebranded Product Package (Salty Fish Onigiri), 2010.

 

7-11 Cafe
7-11 Café Rebranded, 2010.

 

7-11 Porduct Package (Laundry Detergent)
7-11 Rebranded Product Packages (Laundry Detergent), 2010.

 

“‘I see everything through icons and iconic branding,’ Sato once said. And as he continues to create more instantly recognizable logos, most of the world will be seeing more of him” (Horn, “’A Strong Identity Is an Icon’ Says the Designer behind the Uniqlo Logo”). [2]

 

# Other Designs & Books by Kashiwa Sato:

 

SMAP Illustration
SMAP Illustration, 2000.

 

SMAP Vending Machines
SMAP Vending Machines, 2000.

 

Kirin Beer Poster
Kirin Gokunama Beer Series Poster, 2002 – 2005.

 

Kirin Beer Products
Kirin Gokunama Beer Series Cans Packages, 2002 – 2005.

 

Cupnoodles Museum Logo
Cupnoodles Museum Logo, 2011.

 

Cupnoodles Museum, Architecture
Cupnoodles Museum – Architecture In Yokohama, 2011.

 

The Nippon Foundation Logo
The Nippon Foundation Logo, 2012.

 

KASHIWA SATO'S Ultimate Method for Reaching the Essentials - Book 1, September 2007
KASHIWA SATO’S Ultimate Method for Reaching the Essentials – Book 1, Published in September, 2007.

 

BEYOND: KASHIWA SATO - Book 1, 2004 November
BEYOND: KASHIWA SATO – Book 1, Published in November, 2004.

 

 


Works Cited

“KASHIWA SATO – CREATIVE DIRECTOR / SAMURAI INC. TOKYO.” KASHIWA SATO – CREATIVE DIRECTOR / SAMURAI INC. TOKYOkashiwasato.com/.[1]

Horn, Robert. “’A Strong Identity Is an Icon’ Says the Designer behind the Uniqlo Logo.” NATIONAL DESIGN CENTRE, 7 Mar. 2018, www.designsingapore.org/modules/design-news/a-strong-identity-is-an-icon-says-the-designer-behind-the-uniqlo-logo.html.[2]

Johnny. “Kashiwa Sato’s Rebranding for 7-Eleven Japan.” Spoon & Tamago, 18 June 2018, www.spoon-tamago.com/2018/06/18/kashiwa-satos-rebranding-for-7-eleven-japan/.[3]

Williams, Sarah. “Kashiwa Sato: Branding Is Limited by Tradition & Common Sense.” 816 NEW YORK816nyc.com/kashiwa-sato-brand-limited-common-sense/#.Xn7zG4hKiUk.[4]

Yumi, Kiyono. “Creative Director Satō Kashiwa: An Eye for the Iconic.” Nippon.com, 17 Mar. 2017, www.nippon.com/en/people/e00109/creative-director-sato-kashiwa-an-eye-for-the-iconic.html.[5]

 

Oreo Biscuit – An Everlasting Taste for Over A Century (1912-2012)_ Yunfangzhou Tan


Oreo Biscuit – An Everlasting Taste for Over A Century (1912-2012)

VISD2006-01 Graphic Design Hist-20th Cent 

Blog Post 1 – Design in the wild / personal obessions

By Yunfangzhou Tan (# 3166753)

 

2020, Oreo Latest Package
2020, Oreo Latest Package, Photo By Yunfangzhou Tan

 

William A. Turnier, the man who designed the Oreo cookie. (Photo courtesy of the Turnier family as published in Indyweek, Aug. 24, 2011)[4]
William A. Turnier, the man who designed the Oreo cookie. (Photo courtesy of the Turnier family as published in Indyweek, Aug. 24, 2011)[4]

 

1950, Oreo Ad Poster
1950, Oreo Ad Poster

 

1924, Oreo Ad Poster (Craft Foods)
1924, Oreo Ad Poster (Craft Foods)

 

After class as usual, I walked around the Rexall store near my home and bought a box of Oreo Double Stuf Biscuit at a discount price. I am fond of its easy-identifiable package design with a huge biscuit placing in the center of a pouring milk, inside which the product itself tastes the same. Certainly, Oreo is the most popular and best-selling cookies around the world. Its childlike ad shows how to eat and play with Oreo: “twist, lick and then drunk”. Myself, as a crazy snacks lover, find it is worthwhile to know the background history of Oreo.

 

1912, 1st Oreo Package
1912, the 1st Oreo Package

 

1915, Oreo Tin Package
1915, Oreo Tin Package

 

In 1898, there were many companies that came together to make what we now call Nabisco, which is the creator of the Oreo. It was in 1912 that they had the idea to start making a new cookie. The idea was to have two round biscuits made of chocolate flavor and filled with creme in between. The first Oreo is very alike to the one we have today only that the design on the biscuit is different.[1] The original design of the cookie featured a wreath around the edge of the cookie and the name “OREO” in the center. The name Oreo was first trademarked on March 14, 1912. In the United States, they were sold for 25 cents a pound (453 g) in novelty cans with clear glass tops, which is quite different from nowadays blue plastic packaging. The first Oreo was sold on March 6, 1912 to a grocer in Hoboken, New Jersey.[2] When the first box design in 1912 proved bulky, Oreo transitioned to this blue tin. The Oreo shows the design of cookie in its earliest days. Since then the chocolate wafer design has changed just twice.[3] The Oreo Biscuit was renamed in 1921, to “Oreo Sandwich”.[2] In 1923, Oreo cookies were available in packages, which were as opposed to boxes or tins for the first time. The package through 1940s prominently featured women enjoying Oreos and it was yellow as well. In the 1950s, Oreo started to use the see-through cellophane wrapper to package the cookies. Since then Oreo has released more than 30 different flavors worldwide, but original is still our favorite. In the 1960’s, Oreo started packaging several rows of cookies in a box. From 1975 to 1995, Oreo kept its package and changed it very little. After 1950, Oreo changed their packaging drastically, giving us the package we know today.[3]  

 

1923, Oreo Package
1923, Oreo Package

 

Changing Looks, Oreo Stamps
1912 to Today, Changing Looks of Oreo Stamps

 

1937, Oreo Package
1937, Oreo Package

 

1951, Oreo Package
1951, Oreo Package

 

1960, Oreo Package
1960, Oreo Package

 

1973, Oreo Package
1973, Oreo Package

 

1993, Oreo Package
1993, Oreo Package

 

The origin of the name Oreo is unknown, but there are many theories: including derivations from the French word ‘Or’, meaning gold (as early packaging was gold); or the Greek word ‘Oreo’, meaning beautiful, nice or well done. Others believe that the cookie was named Oreo because it was short and easy to pronounce.[2] Another fun truth of Oreo is 50 percent of Oreo eaters pull apart their cookies before they eat them and women are more likely to do the twist than men.[3] 

 

 


Works Cited 

“History of Oreos.” Oreohttp://oreofunandfacts.weebly.com/history-of-oreos.html.[1]

Smith, Ian. “Cool Photos Show the Evolution of Oreo Packaging within 100 Years! …” The Vintage News, 30 Mar. 2016, www.thevintagenews.com/2016/03/30/one-century-of-sweetness-cool-photos-show-the-evolution-of-oreo-packaging-during-the-years-2/.[2]

Russell, Mallory. “Celebrate 100 Years Of Oreo With A History Of Its Marketing.” Business Insider, Business Insider, 3 Mar. 2012, www.businessinsider.com/guess-whos-turning-100-in-style-2012-3#oreo-packaging-1915-2.[3] 

“Tag Archives: Sam Porcello.” Northern Newsjones4567.wordpress.com/tag/sam-porcello/.[4]