Shigeo Fukuda

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“I believe that in design, 30% dignity, 20% beauty and 50% absurdity are necessary. Rather than catering to the design sensitivity of the general public, there is advancement in design if people are left to feel satisfied with their own superiority, by entrapping them with visual illusion.”

—Shigeo Fukuda

Graphic Design: A New History is a great textbook. Throughout the book, it covers a lot of the aspects all over the world. As a child, I grew up under an deastern cultural environment. I found the aesthetics between western and eastern differences fascinating after I studied aboard. One thing to improve in the next edition can includes some famous art influencers from the eastern culture. Shigeo Fukuda is one of my favourite graphic designers and illustrators. Born in 1932 in Tokyo, Japan, Fukuda came from a family primarily employed as toy makers. Early in his adulthood he had an interest in the principles of Swiss design and starting in 1956 he attended the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music. The first Japanese designer to be inducted into the New York Art Directors Club Hall of Fame, his work is recognizable for its simplicity and use of visual illusions.

Much of his work was designed to make a social impact rather than a commercial one and he was a strong advocate for pacifism and environmentalism. Shigeo Fukuda’s sense of high moral responsibility as a graphic designer is undertaken with firm conviction. His work effectively mirrors and embraces the worldly causes he believes in. Coupled with his fine flair for color and layout, along with advanced Japanese reproduction techniques, Fukuda always manages to get his points across. His 1982 Happy Earth Day posters are prime examples. One is a drawing of an upside-down axe, the tool of destruction spoiling the earth’s wilderness. The wooden handle, ironically, sprouts a branch of its own. Fukuda’s pro-environmental concepts are indeed abstract, yet globally familiar

happy-earth-day

1982 Earth Day poster

Contrary to Western styles of expression, Japanese communication is more emotional than rational. Such emotion is profoundly linked to art. Fukuda dramatically shatters all cultural and linguistic barriers with his universally recognizable style. Shigeo Fukuda’s sense of high moral responsibility as a graphic designer is undertaken with firm conviction. His work effectively mirrors and embraces the worldly causes he believes in. Coupled with his fine flair for colour and layout, along with advanced Japanese reproduction techniques, Fukuda always manages to get his points across. By using simple shapes and highly contrasted colours, Fukuda created multiple posters that make influences globally. Shigeo Fukuda, Japan’s Houdini of Design, is a welcome part of the shifting form westen to eastern. His visual originality and deep dedication to worthwhile causes help keep the sun shining brightly over our ever changing, complex world.

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Victory 1945,  1975.                     Illustration work


Work Cited

Designer Focus: Shigeo Fukuda

http://www.designishistory.com/1960/shigeo-fukuda/

Shigeo Fukuda

 

 

McDonald’s logo Evolution

The McDonald’s Golden Arches logo is one of the most recognizable logos in the world for decades. As a student, I would see it multiple times every day, even if it’s just on the way to school. Because of the global reach on the company, The McDonald’s logo is not only a sign for a fast food restaurant, but also symbolizes capitalism, globalisation and American culture nowadays.

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The first McDonald’s was opened by brothers Richard and Maurice in 1940 in San Bernardino, California. They started the fast food culture alongside its burgers and fries weren’t even on the menu. The Tubby chef Speedee was fist designed by Richard and Maurice McDonald in 1948 based on their fast food process they named the ‘Speedee Service System’. The winking character helped to communicate the idea of fast food and the drive-in services.

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Then the second logo came along with the change of the building, which is the Golden Arches logo. The McDonald brothers asked architect Stanley Meston to redesign a building that carried on the traditions of drive-ins and updated it in an appropriate and memorable aesthetic. (Hess, 1986) George Dexter designed two giant yellow arches on both side of the building to be an eye-catching appearance and greater efficiency in 1952. This is how the icon was born when Jim Schindler sketched out these yellow arches and viewed as the letter ‘M’ in some angles. He added a slanting line running through the arches which symbolizes the roof of the store. The bright yellow is the same color with the actual arches. This was an interconnection between the logo and the architecture itself. However, this logo was added after Ray Kroc acquired the company in 1961. This was the time when the Golden Arches became instantly recognizable and helped the company became one of the most popular brands.

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Last but not least, the official McDonald’s Corporation logo, the Golden Arches tagline I’m lovin’it. This was created by Heye & Partner GmbH in 2003, which was a huge success and let the company logo become one of the most iconic marks in the logo. history. They emphasized on the ‘M’ and kept it the way as how the Golden Arches looked. They eliminated those unnecessary elements and kept the whole look simple and clean but maintained its original concepts at the same time.

As one of the most recognizable logos, McDonald’s did a great job. It is not only just about the fast food restaurants, but also the ways how designers developed and improve through time based on the changes in our lives and the expansion of cultures.


Work Cited

 

https://www.creativebloq.com/logo-design/mcdonalds-logo-short-11135325

https://medium.com/@inkbotdesign/history-of-the-mcdonalds-logo-design-abb29ef78741

The Origins of McDonald’s Golden Arches, Alan Hess, Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, 1986, University of California Press