Prototype 4: Materials as Sensors

Stationary Indicator

https://www.nextergo.ai/7-easy-ways-to-reduce-back-pain-at-work/
https://www.nextergo.ai/7-easy-ways-to-reduce-back-pain-at-work/

Introduction

Before the pandemic, many of us spent a large part of our day sitting or in a prolonged restrictive position. With the pandemic forcing most of us to work from home, we have become accustomed to seating for a lengthy-time period, which studies have shown to contribute to most back pains and joint-related problems.

My stationary indicator aims to solve this problem using a DIY pressure sensor that can be attached to any chair. When the pressure pad is activated, the led turns on indicating the device has been activated. If the pad is activated for a set time, the device buzzes suggesting that it is time to talk a walk.

How it’s made 

Materials:
breadboard
microcontroller
buzzer
led
jumper wires
Alligator clips
velostat
conductive fabric
conductive thread
scissors
foam-like material

Step 1: Build pressure sensor pad

The sensor is made from two layers of foam. Sandwiched between them are two cut pieces of conductive fabric and a single piece of velostat.

  1. Cut two pieces of foam to your desired shape and dimensions. The thickness of the foam will be one factor that will determine the sensitivity of the sensor.
  2. Cut two pieces of conductive fabric into the same shape as the foam but slightly smaller than the foam(about 2cm shorter).
  3. Cut the velostat to the same size as the foam.
  4. Attache a long pieceof conductive thread to each of the conductive fabrics by sawing or with a piece of tape.
  5. Place the first piece of foam on a flat surface and attach the conductive fabric to it, pulling the conductive thread to the side.
  6. Place the velostat above the conductive fabric and foam you just assembled. Make sure it is aligned with the foam underneath.
  7. Place the second piece of conductive fabric in the velostat and pull the conductive thread to the side.
  8. Place the second piece of foam on the velostat and aline it the foam underneath.
  9. using none conductive thread, saw around the assembly sandwiching all the components together(do not saw to tightly)

img_7349img_7348

 

 Step 2: Build the circuit

 

prtotype1

 

 Step 3: Code

Right not he code is not perfect. it appears to have glitches when I try to add delays within the if statement. I am working to resolve this. I played around with the code and this seems to be the most stable. use the serial monitor to keep an eye on the input values. you may have to adjust the conditional value within the if statement depending on the input values you are getting through the serial monitor.

#include <math.h>
int touchpin = A0;
const int buzzer = 8;
int led = 9; 
void setup() {
  Serial.begin(9600);
  pinMode(9, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(A0, INPUT);
  pinMode(buzzer, OUTPUT);
}

// the loop function runs over and over again forever
void loop() {
  int sensorValue = analogRead(touchpin);
  Serial.println(sensorValue);
if(analogRead(touchpin) > 40 ){
digitalWrite(led, HIGH);
delay(30000); 
tone(buzzer, 1000);
delay(1000);
noTone(buzzer);     // Stop sound...
delay(1000);

}
  else{
    digitalWrite(led, LOW);
  }
  
}

#include <math.h>
int touchpin = A3;
int led = 9; 
void setup() {
  Serial.begin(9600);
  pinMode(9, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(A0, INPUT);
}

// the loop function runs over and over again forever
void loop() {
  int sensorValue = analogRead(touchpin);
  Serial.println(sensorValue);
if(analogRead(touchpin) < 100 ){
digitalWrite(led, HIGH);
  
}
  else{
    digitalWrite(led, LOW);
  }
  
}

please note some of the codes used here were modified from the arduino reference library. from https://www.arduino.cc/reference/en/language/functions/analog-io/analogread/img_7390

Prototype 4: Materials as Sensors

Weight-Sensitive Canvas Bag


Key Image

img_1260


Description

I embroidered this tote bag using alpaca yarn, my favourite fibre.

img_1803

bolsa

In this project the canvas bag lights sewed at the front of the canvas bag indicate the weight being carried inside the bag. There is a scale of lights depending on the weight placed inside. The first light turns on to indicate there is something in the bag, the second light will turn on when more weight is added, and the third light indicates the maximum weight has been reached.

Sensor was made with two layers of aluminum foil separated by a layer of velostat. I glued aluminum foil to velostat in the four corners on each side and covered this with a sleeve made of non-conductive fabric. Sensor’s input goes through pin A2 and output to LED lights goes through pins A1, A3 and A7.

The sensor is placed at the bottom of the canvas bag, so when some weight is placed on the bag and a person lifts it, LED lights will go on depending on the weight of the bag.


Parts and Materials List

Parts

  • Adafruit Circuit Playground Express
  • Resistor
  • Sewable LED lights
  • Li-Ion Poly 1200mAh battery

Materials

  • Aluminum foil
  • Velostat
  • Non-conductive fabric
  • Alligator-clip jumper wires
  • Conductive thread
  • Non-conductive thread
  • Canvas bag embroidered with Alpaca yarn

Tools

  • Scissors
  • Glue gun

Circuit Diagram

materialassensor


Code

See code here.


How-To

wa4_step01 Step 1
Cut a piece of velostat and two pieces of aluminum foil. Fold aluminum foil to match the size of the velostat, leaving a narrow tip out for connectors.
wa4_step02 Step 2
Aluminum foil was glued to each side of the velostat in the four corners, so glue does interfere with flow of electricity between the two layers of aluminum foil.
wa4_step04 Step 3
Sensor is covered with non-conductive fabric to isolate the sensor and avoid short circuits. Fabric is thick, so it provides some cushion too. Fabric is stitched on the sides to make a sleeve that will cover the sensor.
wa4_step03 Step 4
Next is to fix the Circuit Playground Express and connect LED lights. I used both conductive and non-conductive thread.
wa4_step05 Step 5
The Circuit Playground Express board is stitched at the top of the bag using non-conductive thread.
wa4_step07
wa4_step06
Step 6
Lights are stitched and connected to the corresponding “pins” in the Circuit Playground Express board using conductive thread.
wa4_step08
wa4_step09
Step 7
Sensor is placed at the bottom of the canvas bag and connected using alligator-clip jumper wires. Also, battery is connected to the Circuit Playground Express board.

assig-4


References

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1Vy6H1Qb5wpIZdIYdv4m98Y14lGPPPKvkvEOQQha6Id8/edit?usp=sharing

Visual Power-By Jessy

cover

 

keyimagesdetials

Parts & Materials List:

Arduino Nano IoT

LED & Wires

Glove

Sponge pieces

Non-conductive Material

Conductive Fabric

Velostat

Code Link

https://github.com/xinzhang-jessy/bodycentric-prototype4.git

 

Reference:

Code reference

https://github.com/katehartman/Make-Wearable-Electronics/blob/master/MWE_Ch07_SingleThreshold/MWE_Ch07_SingleThreshold.ino

Pressure sensors reference

https://canvascloud.ocadu.ca/courses/1337/pages/lecture-and-demo-materials-as-sensors-56-min-+-24-min?module_item_id=112728

 

Weighing Bag

%e6%9c%aa%e6%a0%87%e9%a2%98-4-01-01-01
 Material List

(1)Conductive thread

(1)Crochet hook

(1)yarn

(3)Alligator clips

(1)Button battery

(1)Lilypad

Instructions
%e6%9c%aa%e6%a0%87%e9%a2%98-1-01-01-01 %e6%9c%aa%e6%a0%87%e9%a2%98-2-01-01-01 %e6%9c%aa%e6%a0%87%e9%a2%98-3-01-01-011613092457871

For more detailed tutorials of crochet, please see https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/how-to-crochet-for-beginners-979092

Circuit Diagram
%e6%9c%aa%e6%a0%87%e9%a2%98-5
References

https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/how-to-crochet-for-beginners-979092

https://www.instructables.com/Circular-Knit-Stretch-Sensor/

Safe & Secure by Nishu

prototype-3

Project Description

Light has always been used as an object or medium to help, direct, signal, assist and inform us on a particular status or situation. It is used in different colours and forms  that help translate our language into a visual and simple medium. Using this medium I have chosen to build three Body-Environmental Switches that all revolve around an overarching theme of Safety & Security. These switches activate LED lights when a person interacts with their environments. 

The reason I have picked this theme is because I have drawn inspiration from three incidents that have occured in my life in the past month. A common point between all these situations was that they occurred due to a lack of a visual cue. In the presence of light signals, people would have been more aware of their environment and the situation they were in. Hence be able to avoid these situations accordingly. 

 

1- Door lock sensor (Dragonbolt)

door-sensor

Description:

The first incident that occurred was three weeks ago when someone broke into my house. As all doors and windows in my house are sliding mechanisms, unlike a regular door with a hinge there is no obvious way to know when these kinds of doors are locked. Most doors of this nature generally indicate that the door is locked with a clipping sound as you close it. But many a time while closing these doors, if not shut with the right force the door remains unlocked. I chose to intervene here with a door sensor that replaces the audio cue for a locked door with a visual one. So when the door is shut properly, the LED light comes on. This also helps indicate from a distance when a door is unlocked.

The sensor uses a simple mechanism of a bridge switch such that, when the door is pushed to the right distance, the circuit closes and the  LED is turned on. With the help of a small piece of copper on the sliding door, it completes the circuit on the door frame, turning on the LED. To also aesthetically present the LED, I have propped it onto a copper dragonfly model that can be mounted on a wall close to these doors. 

 

Parts & Materials:

Parts

  1. Arduino Nano 33 IOT
  2. Red LED
  3. USB charger
  4. Breadboard
  5. Jumper wires
  6. Alligator to alligator clips 

Materials

  1. Copper tape
  2. Metal dragonfly
  3. Double sided tape

 

Detailed images:

1 2 3 4

Discussion:

At the moment the prototype does consist of a lot of wiring as I needed to conceal the breadboard and the laptop that is powering it. In the next iterations I would work towards using a 3V battery as a power source and create a compact unit entirely around the dragonfly so it can be instantly installed anywhere. I would also like to find a replacement for the copper tapes that are holding the jumper wires with a conductive sticky pad that can be easily installed on the door frame. 

 

2- Baby back sensor (Sleepeasy)

baby-sensor

Description:

The second incident that occurred was a month ago while having some friends and their new born baby over. Just as they walked in they laid their baby boy down on the bed. Being new parents and having read all the books on how to raise and take care of the baby, they alternately took turns to check on him. They were most concerned to see whether he was always sleeping on his back. It was then that they told me that in spite of the baby sleeping in a crib in the same room as them, they constantly needed to wake up at night to make sure that he is always sleeping on his back. This is to prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) It is the unexplained death, usually during sleep, of a seemingly healthy baby less than a year old. SIDS is sometimes known as crib death because the infants often die in their cribs. Having this constant fear of the death of their child sounded horrible. 

And so my second intervention is a Sleepeasy baby pad that uses a push button mechanism. The pad is meant to be kept under the baby and as long as the baby is on its back, the weight of the baby touches the surfaces together, lighting up the LED. The lit LED will always inform the parent that the child is on its back. If the baby were to roll off, the surfaces would separate and the LED would go off.  

 

Parts & Materials:

Parts

  1. Arduino Nano 33 IOT
  2. Red LED
  3. USB charger
  4. Breadboard
  5. Jumper wires
  6. 6. Alligator to alligator clips 

Materials

  1. Copper tape
  2. Aluminium foil
  3. Thin foam paper
  4. Origami paper

 

Detailed images:

1 2 3 4

Discussion:

Currently the prototype uses aluminium foil as the conductive surface and an LED on the breadboard. Even though the aluminium was stretched it does not go back to its original state as the weight is relieved. This causes the LED to flicker as it transitions between states. The next iteration would look for alternatives for this surface and work at incorporating the light within the sleep pad. With the help of Lilypad LEDs or even LED strips, I would be able to incorporate them within the thickness of the sleep pad.

 

3- Sanitize please

sanitizer-sensor

Description:

Having just recovered from COVID-19 has made me more cautious and more worried for my loved ones. As time passes, the world is getting back to normal but people still seem to forget that we are in the midst of a pandemic. My mother being an interior designer often has a lot of her team members and vendors come over. But often they forget to sanitize their hands as they enter the house. In order to keep enforcing this protocol, I have decided to create a sanitizing station that visually captures their attention as they enter.  

With the simple use of a bridge switch, I have created a platform to place a sanitizer on. As long as the sanitizer is on the platform, the LED stays on and captures people’s attention as they enter.

 

Parts & Materials:

Parts

  1. Arduino Nano 33 IOT
  2. Red LED
  3. USB charger
  4. Breadboard
  5. Jumper wires

Materials

  1. Copper tape
  2. Wooden block
  3. Thin foam paper

 

Detailed images:

1 2 3 4

Discussion:

Currently the prototype uses copper tape to complete the circuit. I did face some difficulty in attaching the jumper wires on the side. As the pins of the wire are straight, I need to bend them a bit to come in contact with the copper tape. That caused a bit of a loose connection. In my next iteration, I would like to replace the copper tape on the bottom of the bottle with an adaptable base that can be used on sanitizers of different sizes.

 

Arduino code for all 3 prototypes

https://github.com/AbhishekNishu16/Body-Centric-Tech-Prototype-3.git

 

Circuit diagram for all 3 prototypescircuit-diagram

Squishy Earrings by Grace Yuan

cover
material-list instructions instructions-1 instructions-2

Arduino Code

https://github.com/graceyuanjq/Squishy-Earrings/blob/main/Arduino%20Code

Circuit Diagram

circuit-diagram

References

https://www.intelligentliving.co/continuity-earring-monitors-glucose-levels-diabetics/
https://applysci.com/smart-earring-monitors-heart-rate-calories-activity/
https://twitter.com/wualeds/status/1337069945306435585
https://www.instructables.com/Flexible-Fabric-Pressure-Sensor/

 

My LED Basket Handbag

proto3-cover

My Prototype 3: Digital Switches for Embodied Interactions My LED Basket Bag

I decided to use a basket bag to experiment the prototype of three switchers which are activated through the use of LEDs. There are two body environment switches such when someone hold the basket bag handles and fairy lights become activated, and when the bag is opened a switch located at the bottom of the bag activate LEDs place inside the bag. The other category I can call clothing gesture because the bag has a button that helps to lock up safely through a loop, then when bag is close with the loop LED’s light are activate by a switch
img_0871

Circuit Diagram

We have three circuits for the digital switches –red, blue and yellow, each of them representing a set of lights, the yellow representing a set of fairy lights– and three circuits to power the LED lights. Pins D2, D3 and D4 are used for the digital switches and ports D11, D12 and D13 are used to power the LED lights. Of course, this diagram is a simplified version, because the wiring inside the handbag depended on space and positions of switches and LED lights (we use sets of light for every switch and the wiring had to satisfy these requirements).
prototype3

Here detailed hand made diagram of the wiring for each switch.
handdiagram

Arduino Source Code
Code can be found in GitHub (see here).

Description

A. Handle: Body/Environmental Switch

When a person holds the handbag by the handle, the handle will be illuminated with a strip of fairy lights. When the user releases the handle, the light will go off.
The switch was made using copper adhesive tape, which is wired to an board mounted on a using flexible wire. To make the bridge I used copper tape and a red cloth where I adhered the tape and when I hold the handle with this cloth the bridge activated the circuit and switch then lights were on. The Arduino card and all the connection were place inside the basket bag.

Discussion

Overall, all the switches worked well, although there are some reflections which are applicable to all three switches because they use similar materials and have similar connectivity. First, I do not like the connections are so visible, I would like to something more subtle, but I am still learning and prefer to be more comfortable with connections that the appearance for now, but this look bother me
About the wiring and switches can be further refined, copper tape is easy to manipulate plus its flexibility helped me to attach to a surface such the basket which is hard but not enough to keep stick in place, sometimes the tape didn’t stick well and if I moved the basket so much the connectivity could get lost and stop working, maybe using conductive fabric could be a better option.
Another point perhaps is the use of a full-size breadboard and the Arduino Nano 33 IOT
This bord is large and with the battery connected are heavy to place inside the bag. Maybe using the Adafruit’s Circuit Playground Express would have been better, but I think using the Arduino Nano to make this prototype is probably fine, but it is good I can realize about what I like and what I do not like to make better choices for my final work.

Material used in this prototype

Arduino Nano 33 IOT
Breadboard
Adhesive copper tape
fJumpers
Fairy Lights
Rechargeable 5V battery
Stranded wire cover with silicone
Basket Bag
Piece of red cloth

img_0908

img_0909

img_0904

asasolo2

See full video here.

B. Button Up: Clothing/Gestures Switch

The handbag is “locked” with a loop and a button. When a person closes and locks the handbag by placing the loop around the button, two LEDs at the centre exterior surface of the handbag will go on. When a person opens the handbag by releasing the loop around the button, the exterior light will go off. The connections were using copper tape and stranded wire cover with silicone because was very thin and flexible. The switch was located along the loop then when the bag was button up the contact between the button and loop activated the switch and LEDs were on.

img_0989

img_0992

Discussion

These reflections are almost the same I stated above on the handle switch, all the switchers used similar materials and have similar connections. First, I do not like the connections are so visible, I would have preferred something more subtle, but I am still learning and prefer to be more comfortable with connections than the appearance for now, but the look still bothers me.
About the wiring and switches, they can be further refined. Copper tape is easy to manipulate and its flexibility helped when attaching to the basket surface. However, the continuous movement of the bag caused the tape to move and, in some cases, detach from the basket surface, which caused loose connectivity. Again, definitely using conductive fabric could be a better option.
Another point perhaps is the use of a full-size breadboard and the Arduino Nano 33 IOT. That plus the battery was large and heavy to place inside the bag. Maybe using Adafruit’s Circuit Playground Express would have been a better alternative. I also need to do more research about the wireless options available in the Arduino Nano, which may help reduce some wiring. I am happy with the outcome, but not so much with the visible connections.
In terms of usability, I think it would be better to reverse this switch. The idea is that if a handbag is unattended and somebody opens it, a LED light will go on as some kind of alert. I would also like to add a sound, but that required to a speaker to the configuration which I still do not have. Another option would be to send a message to a device (a phone), but that would require an application listening.

Material used in this prototype

Arduino Nano 33 IOT
Breadboard
Adhesive copper tape
Jumpers
LED lights
Rechargeable 5V battery
Stranded wire cover with silicone
Basket Bag
I use practically the same material for all the three switches, but here instead of fairy light I used LEDs

img_0972

luzsola2

See full video here

C. LED’s Inside Basket Bag: Clothing Gestures

When a person opens the handbag, a set of lights will go on to illuminate the interior of the handbag. When the handbag is closed, the set of lights inside will go off.
It is always handy to have light inside a handbag if the owner is looking for something inside. The circuit in this prototype was build in a similar way than the other two switchers. Here the switch is placed at the bottom of the handbag, then when the handbag opens the upper and bottom part of the handbag activates the switcher. The copper tape makes contact and LEDs go on.

img_0988

img_0950

Discussion

Overall, the switch worked well, similar reflections that I made for the previous prototypes applied here too. There is also room for improvement, my big take here is to use conductive fabric and a smaller board like Adafruit’s Circuit Playground Express.

Material used in this prototype

Arduino Nano 33 IOT
Breadboard
Adhesive copper tape
Jumpers
LED lights
Rechargeable 5V battery
Stranded wire cover with silicone
Basket Bag

12

See full video here

img_0984

botonyasa2

See full video here

Light Signals

slide1

LEDs are versatile and can be used for a variety of purposes. For some, LEDs help illuminate their surroundings and for others, this could be used as a visual indicator to alert others of their presence. These three prototypes all explore the latter use of the LEDs and explores how different types of gestures can be used to indicate visual feedback through the LEDs.

1. LED Biker Jacket

biker_jacket
Description

For this prototype, I created an LED Biker jacket. The idea behind this was for the LEDs to act as an indicator to alert all vehicles and road users to see bike riders at night. Since the jacket zip was conductive, I cut up two pieces of aluminum foil and pinned them each to two sides of the jacket. The two pieces of aluminum foil will come into contact with each other when the jacket is zipped up and touching both sides of the aluminum. When this happens, the LEDs light up indicating the presence of the biker. This prototype made use of clothing gestures.

Parts and Materials

LED bulbs

Alligator clips

Arduino microcontroller

Aluminum foil

Power bank

Jumper wires

Biker jacket

Full-sized breadboard

Detailed Photos
img_8174
Circuit
img_8182
Circuit on Jacket
img_8184
Jacket on hanger
img_8210
All Zipped Up
img_8217
Lights On

 

Discussion

Currently, the prototype makes use of LED bulbs which are simply taped to the jacket. For future iterations, I would make use of LED strips to have them more integrated as part of the jacket. Also, I believe a conductive thread would have worked better to help with the overall presentation of the prototype. Moving forward, I might need to get the Lilypad microcontroller to help with a more seamless design.

Code

Github

Circuit diagram

biker_jacket_bb

2. Biker Signal Gloves

led_gloves
Description

These LED light signal gloves are designed for cyclists to wear for their safety on the road. These arrow LED strips are controlled when the person wearing the gloves presses his/her index finger and thumb against each other. This activates the LEDs depending on which of the gloves is used. The left glove indicates a left turn signal, while the right glove indicates a right turn signal. This is used to show other commuters on the road when you want to turn left or right. To make this connection happen, I sewed on aluminum foil to the thumb and index finger portion of the glove and then made the connection from the breadboard through the use of alligator clips. This prototype makes use of body gestures, with the movement of the thumb and index finger to create the connection.

Parts and Materials

LED strips

Alligator clips

Arduino microcontroller

Aluminum foil

Power bank

Jumper wires

Gloves

Full-sized breadboard

 Detailed Photos
img_8259
Circuit
img_8234
Stitching up LED Strips
img_8249
Connecting circuit to LED strips
img_3667
LEDs off
img_3665
LEDs on; Left signal + Right signal
Discussion

I believe this was a successful prototype in terms of execution and how I intended it to work. However, the gloves are still too bulky and uncomfortable to wear due to it having to be connected to a power bank and breadboard in order to work. For future iterations, I think the use of a coin battery, as well as a Lilypad microcontroller, will make this prototype easily wearable and more functional as a final prototype. In addition, having the LEDs blink for some time after the signal will also be helpful and will make it easier for the cyclist who is having to ride and make the signal at the same time.

Code

Github

Circuit diagram

led_gloves

3. LED Footmat

led_foot
Description

The LED Footmat is a doormat that uses aluminum foil as a conductive material to light up an LED as a signal when someone arrives home. This prototype is an environment gesture that is activated when a person steps on the pressure point of the doormat. This pressure point is created by two pieces of aluminum foil that are connected to two sides of a piece of handkerchief and folded over each other. The two pieces of foil are separated by a piece of foam. This connection is a simple setup and can be used simply as a visual indicator for someone who arrives home late.

Parts and Materials

LED bulbs

Alligator clips

Arduino microcontroller

Aluminum foil

Power bank

Jumper wires

Handkerchief

Doormat

Foam

Full-sized breadboard

Detailed Photos
img_8260
Setting up tools
img_8267
Laying down conductive material; aluminum foil
img_8275
Connecting circuit to LEDs and aluminium foil
img_3668
Final Prototype: Outside
img_3669
Final Prototype: Inside
Discussion

This prototype was fairly simple to make and did not require a lot of materials or complex connections. However, I feel that there are some things I could have done better. I could have used conductive fabric and LED strips to sew into the doormat and this would have made for a more aesthetically pleasing experience and helped to hide some of the loose wires hanging. A future iteration to consider will be how to integrate sound into the experience. When the user steps on the mat, they will receive light and sound feedback as well.

Code

Github

Circuit Diagram

Same as LED Biker Jacket

Image Attribution

<div>Icons made by <a href=”https://www.freepik.com” title=”Freepik”>Freepik</a> from <a href=”https://www.flaticon.com/” title=”Flaticon”>www.flaticon.com</a></div>

Body Gesture Signal-By Jessy

 

cover

  1. Visible Pulse

 

 

 

 

 

Description

Visible Pulse is an installation that combines the finger and the wrist as a trigger to switch on. The wrists are the more flexible part of our body and the place where we can feel the pulse. Whenever the finger touches the wrist, the LED on the switch starts to blink, which can be considered as a simulation of the pulse. The working principle is based on a touch sensor (Adafruit MPR121) and using a skin surface that is conductive, as a basic switch.

1-1 1-2

Code link:

Prototype 3-1: https://github.com/xinzhang-jessy/bodygesturesignal.git

 

2.Idea Bracelet

Description

Idea Bracelet is also based on a touch sensor (Adafruit MPR121), there are normal material and conductive material that covered the third finger. When snap fingers (usually using the third finger), the LEDs embedded on the bracelet will be sequential light up. Whenever we get a new idea, we may snap our fingers involuntarily. The emotion brought by this action is dynamic and happy, so I use this action as a switch to trigger the LEDs.

2-1 2-2Code link:

Prototype 3-2: https://github.com/xinzhang-jessy/bodygesturesignal.git

3. Running signal

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description

This is a wearable installation that being triggered by running and the working principle is also realized by the touch sensor (Adafruit MPR121). Running is an ordinary activity and people usually swing their arms during running. Basing on this regulation, I use running gesture as a trigger of this wearable insulation. Firstly, sew the conductive fabric onto ordinary clothes, and installed an LED matrix as signal output. Whenever taking action of swing arms, the LED matrix will be light up.

3-1 3-2

Code link:

Prototype 3-3: https://github.com/xinzhang-jessy/bodygesturesignal.git

Discussion

In this series of prototypes, I found the body as an interesting switch, and I began to pay attention to movements that are often overlooked, especially gestures, like when we tap our fingers, that is probably we are waiting for something, or we seldom feel the change of facial expressions. These actions sometimes can be an indication of the internal change which may be missed by ourselves. In my work, I want to use a simple action or gesture as a switch to trigger the installation and I think there should be more sensors being applied, such as pulse detection. More specifically, in the first work, the Visible Pulse, at present, the signal can not be exactly a real one without pulse detection. So for further modification, I need a pulse detection sensor to obtain real data and convert it into the visible LED signal. When each finger touches the wrist, it will reflect a real pulse signal.